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  • Airborne: First to arrive on D-Day

    Whether by parachute or glider, the first allied soldiers to reach land didn't have an easy arrival.

    https://ww2thebigone.com/2016/06/07/...rive-on-d-day/

  • #2
    Originally posted by mojo1a View Post
    Whether by parachute or glider, the first allied soldiers to reach land didn't have an easy arrival.

    https://ww2thebigone.com/2016/06/07/...rive-on-d-day/
    The first were the British glider crews at the Pegagus Bridge.

    http://www.memorial-pegasus.org/mmp/...ement/?lang=uk
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
      The first were the British glider crews at the Pegagus Bridge.

      http://www.memorial-pegasus.org/mmp/...ement/?lang=uk
      Described as 'one of the finest feats of flying of the entire war'...



      The long toll of the brave
      Is not lost in darkness
      Over the fruitful earth
      And athwart the seas
      Hath passed the light of noble deeds
      Unquenchable forever.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Von Richter View Post


        Described as 'one of the finest feats of flying of the entire war'...





        It is one of the greatest feats of any war.
        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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        • #5
          At least the British treated the Glider Troops and the Paratroopers the same. The US Army treated the Glider Troops just like Line Infantry and did not give them Jump Pay like the Paratroopers.

          Pruitt
          Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

          Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

          by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
            At least the British treated the Glider Troops and the Paratroopers the same. The US Army treated the Glider Troops just like Line Infantry and did not give them Jump Pay like the Paratroopers.

            Pruitt
            Didn't they eventually get extra pay? Its still not right, but I thought the Army had righted it at some point.

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            • #7
              Yeah, they did get extra pay, but I don't know if it equaled Jump Pay. I doubt if they went back and gave retroactive pay to any guys that had been doing this for a while.

              Pruitt
              Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

              Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

              by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                Yeah, they did get extra pay, but I don't know if it equaled Jump Pay. I doubt if they went back and gave retroactive pay to any guys that had been doing this for a while.

                Pruitt
                I don't think the concept of retroactive pay existed back then. From what I've read the Gliders sounded more dangerous that parachuting in.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by mojo1a View Post
                  Whether by parachute or glider, the first allied soldiers to reach land didn't have an easy arrival.

                  https://ww2thebigone.com/2016/06/07/...rive-on-d-day/
                  Oh, I agree but neither did the first waves on the beaches. I think initial assaults on enemy land usually have that problem, if you had time for thought it would be a difficult choice. So who arrived first and who suffered the most is of little concern. lcm1
                  'By Horse by Tram'.


                  I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                  " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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                  • #10
                    The US and Britain made the same mistake, after air borne and glider crews accomplished their mission they were used as ordinary infantry and their numbers were decimated.
                    These were highly motivated well trained groups. Before the mission to capture and secure what is now known as Pegasus Bridge, the understanding was that as soon as regular forces came up from the beaches, the special forces (air borne) would be relieved and sent back to England to prepare for the next air borne mission, however, only the glider pilots and the wounded air borne members went back, the rest were assigned as replacements for wounded or killed regular forces.
                    The orders came from Monty, and had a directly adverse affect on future air borne mission AKA, Market Garden. At least, this is the opinion of many survivors of the original British AB groups.
                    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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                    • #11
                      It has been said that the first paratrooper to land in Normandy was Pvt. MacFarlane, a Texan that jumped from Lillyman's stick.
                      My worst jump story:
                      My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                      As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                      No lie.

                      ~
                      "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                      -2 Commando Jumpmaster

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                      • #12
                        Some of my sources state that it was the Free French paras of 4th SAS which landed in France first (Operation Dingson, Operation Samwest) around 22:30-23:30 hrs on the night of June 5th. Their first KIA was recorded approximately 45 minutes later...Cpl. Emile Bouetard.

                        While their task was part of Overlord, their mission is always overlooked because they jumped over Brittany.
                        You'll live, only the best get killed.

                        -General Charles de Gaulle

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                        • #13
                          Company D of the 6th AB, the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry landed by glider and parachute landed at 00:16 on June 6, 1944.

                          The small force of 181 men was commanded by Major John Howard and joined with a detachment of Royal Engineers who landed at Ranville-Benouville in six 28-men Horsa gliders. Having taken off from Dorset, the gliders were towed across the Channel by Halifax Bombers. With perfect navigation and piloting skill, the gliders landed on time and on target within few yards of each other. Major Howard’s glider landed within a few feet of the canal bridge. The bridge was captured after a fierce ten minute fire fight, the action all over by 0026, a full six hours before the
                          beach landings.
                          http://d-dayrevisited.co.uk/d-day/pegasus-bridge.html
                          Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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                          • #14
                            But which Ox and Bucks battalion?

                            Pruitt
                            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Urban hermit View Post
                              Company D of the 6th AB, the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry landed by glider and parachute landed at 00:16 on June 6,
                              And IIRC, the landing time was confirmed because the impact stopped someone's watch on Major Howard's glider.
                              "Shoot for the epaulets, boys! Shoot for the epaulets!" - Daniel Morgan

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