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On this date in 1940 (part 2)

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  • On this date in 1940 (part 2)

    The final Allied troops were evacuated from "Dunkerque"

    http://vaviper.blogspot.com/2015/06/...all-never.html
    Will no one tell me what she sings?--
    Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
    For old, unhappy, far-off things,
    And battles long ago:
    -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

  • #2
    Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
    The final Allied troops were evacuated from "Dunkerque"

    http://vaviper.blogspot.com/2015/06/...all-never.html
    The evacuation carried on after Dunkirk, Operation Aerial, with the last troopship leaving France for England on the 25th June 1940. 21 Days after Dunkirk. So it seems largely forgotten after the hype of Dunkirk, but the figures of the extra men that made it back to England after Dunkirk are included in figures of the Dunkirk miracle. Myth remains more popular than fact.
    The repetition of affirmations leads to belief. Once that belief becomes a deep conviction, you better wake up and look at the facts.

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    • #3
      Do they count (mainly French) troops that were returned to France later in June and then (attempted to be) evacuated again?
      "Keep Calm. Use Less X's"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by dmf01 View Post
        Do they count (mainly French) troops that were returned to France later in June and then (attempted to be) evacuated again?
        They may not be included in the count but certainly in the explanatory material. Lord certainly accounts for them in The Miracle of Dunkirk https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...cle_of_Dunkirk
        Will no one tell me what she sings?--
        Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
        For old, unhappy, far-off things,
        And battles long ago:
        -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

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        • #5
          On this date in 1940 -

          Soviet bombers shot down a Finnish civilian airliner 'Kaleva' (Ju 52-3/mge) over the Baltic Sea in either international or Estonian airspace. Though event didn't occur in war time (the Winter War had already ended) it was an important event in the chain that lead to the Continuation War.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaleva_(airplane)
          It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion, it is by the beans of Java that thoughts acquire speed. The hands acquire shaking, the shaking becomes a warning. It is by caffeine alone I set my mind in motion

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          • #6
            The British also held a couple more evacuations from France. Unfortunately they did not always evacuate the troops they landed. I think they even landed the 1st Canadian Infantry Division and then changed their mind and evacuated them. Unfortunately they lost two Brigades of the 51st Highland Division who had been sent to the Maginot Line! To rebuild the division they stripped the 9th Scottish Division (2nd Line Territorials).

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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            • #7
              In May 1940 the 51st (Highland) Division was in the Saarland occupying positions in front of the Maginot Line (where the mainly Territorial formation had been sent to get patrolling experience). When the balloon went up, they were pulled out and sent to hold the line of the lower Somme under command of the French Tenth Army as part of IX Corps. Under orders to remain with the French, the option to head for the coast to evacuate by sea were postponed. After a fighting retreat from river valley to river valley, when the division eventually concentrated at the small harbour town of St Valery-en-Caux, it was too late.

              Together with French troops of IX Corps, the division was cut off by German armour. Fog and enemy control of the neighbouring cliffs prevented the Navy getting ships in to pick evacuating troops. With ammunition running out and the centre of St Valery crammed with troops being destroyed by German shelliing, there was no option but to surrender on the morning of 12th June. Fortunately, one brigade (known as Arkforce) sent to cover the line of retreat, managed to escape from Le Havre. More details and OB here:
              http://51hd.co.uk/history/bef
              http://51hd.co.uk/history/valery_1940

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              • #8
                British troops that had been fighting on the Somme (yes there was fighting on the Somme in WW2 as well) were evacuated after Dunkirk. It was not an evacuation under fire but it was all very rushed. A family friend , a Frenchwoman who was living in Normandy but married to a British naval officer was informed by 'phone that a space had been allotted her on one of the ships but she had only a couple of hours to get to it and she could only take one small suitcase. She drove her car to the dockside and abandoned it.
                Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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