Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

A New Title

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • A New Title

    Watching a history presentation about WWII last PM, I heard a new title for himself given by an explorer of military structures and battlefields - "conflict archaeologist".

    Apparently this has now become a recognized field of specialized study, instead of the realm of the old fashioned "military historians".
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
    Watching a history presentation about WWII last PM, I heard a new title for himself given by an explorer of military structures and battlefields - "conflict archaeologist".

    Apparently this has now become a recognized field of specialized study, instead of the realm of the old fashioned "military historians".
    I sympathise, but, though "history, "archaeology," and "anthropology" are kindred disciplines, they are distinct. According to Dictionary.com, the first two definitions of "history" are:
    noun, plural histories.
    1.
    the branch of knowledge dealing with past events.
    2.
    a continuous, systematic narrative of past events as relating to a particular people, country, period, person, etc., usually written as a chronological account; chronicle:
    a history of France; a medical history of the patient.
    while "archaeology" is defined as
    the scientific study of historic or prehistoric peoples and their cultures by analysis of their artifacts, inscriptions, monuments, and other such remains, especially those that have been excavated
    So, if you have ever dug up a Minie ball on a Civil War battlefielld, as I have, you have become a "conflict archaeologist." Or maybe even a "conflict anthropologist." Congratulations.



    Susie
    Last edited by Desiree Clary; 13 May 16, 17:26. Reason: spelling
    Will no one tell me what she sings?--
    Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
    For old, unhappy, far-off things,
    And battles long ago:
    -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

    Comment


    • #3
      Why not, quantitative analysts, social psychologists, literary critics, social theorists, feminists..... have all jumped into history.

      Those interested in this invasion should read Keith Windshuttle's "The Killing of History: How literary critics and social theorists are murdering our past
      Leadership is the ability to rise above conventional wisdom.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
        I sympathise, but, though "history, "archaeology," and "anthropology" are kindred disciplines, they are distinct. According to Dictionary.com, the first two definitions of "history" are: while "archaeology" is defined as

        So, if you have ever dug up a Minie ball on a Civil War battlefielld, as I have, you have become a "conflict archaeologist." Or maybe even a "conflict anthropologist." Congratulations.



        Susie
        I'm not sure anybody could really be termed a "conflict anthropologist" purely on the basis of digging up a Minie ball. Anthropology,as I was taught, is the comparative study of the origins, culture, mores and beliefs of varying societies throughout the world: historical and contemporary.

        It would take rather more than the random discovery of a bullet to justify such a title, methinks.
        "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
        Samuel Johnson.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
          Watching a history presentation about WWII last PM, I heard a new title for himself given by an explorer of military structures and battlefields - "conflict archaeologist".

          Apparently this has now become a recognized field of specialized study, instead of the realm of the old fashioned "military historians".
          I'm afraid my being on the receiving end of a archaeologists daily grind makes me feel ancient!! lcm1
          'By Horse by Tram'.


          I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
          " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
            I'm not sure anybody could really be termed a "conflict anthropologist" purely on the basis of digging up a Minie ball. Anthropology,as I was taught, is the comparative study of the origins, culture, mores and beliefs of varying societies throughout the world: historical and contemporary.

            It would take rather more than the random discovery of a bullet to justify such a title, methinks.
            I'd have to watch the show, but it seems like the fella on the TV would have to do much more than explore military battlefields and structures. Otherwise, I'm an educational archaeologist. I explore my school every day - 4 floors, 3 distinct wings, with offices and storage space for days. This all makes me want to .

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
              I'm not sure anybody could really be termed a "conflict anthropologist" purely on the basis of digging up a Minie ball. Anthropology,as I was taught, is the comparative study of the origins, culture, mores and beliefs of varying societies throughout the world: historical and contemporary.

              It would take rather more than the random discovery of a bullet to justify such a title, methinks.
              It wasn't random! I was looking for it!
              Will no one tell me what she sings?--
              Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
              For old, unhappy, far-off things,
              And battles long ago:
              -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
                I'm afraid my being on the receiving end of a archaeologists daily grind makes me feel ancient!! lcm1
                *wants to go to Normandy to look for a Sten gun casing*
                Will no one tell me what she sings?--
                Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
                For old, unhappy, far-off things,
                And battles long ago:
                -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
                  It wasn't random! I was looking for it!
                  I guess you know that if it was from a National Park Battlefield we are not supposed to remove anything.

                  I got a small rock I found in my pocket after visiting the Angle at Gettysburg.

                  A flat stone ended up in my pocket from Antietam Creek

                  A blood red stone from Omaha and a bit of barbed wire from the Maginot Line.

                  I don't know how is stuff got in my pocket but I pretend.

                  Ah, the devil made me do it.
                  "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                  Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                  you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
                    *wants to go to Normandy to look for a Sten gun casing*
                    Just the casing? You can have the whole Bloody gun. lcm1
                    'By Horse by Tram'.


                    I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                    " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
                      I guess you know that if it was from a National Park Battlefield we are not supposed to remove anything.

                      I got a small rock I found in my pocket after visiting the Angle at Gettysburg.

                      A flat stone ended up in my pocket from Antietam Creek

                      A blood red stone from Omaha and a bit of barbed wire from the Maginot Line.

                      I don't know how is stuff got in my pocket but I pretend.

                      Ah, the devil made me do it.
                      It was from the Palomito Ranch battlefield, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Palmito_Ranch

                      which is indeed on the National Registry of Historic Places, but not a National Park.

                      I am a bad girl.
                      Will no one tell me what she sings?--
                      Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
                      For old, unhappy, far-off things,
                      And battles long ago:
                      -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Military archeology would be more accurate I'd say...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It used to be "military archaeologist", which usually referred scholars specializing in structures, fortifications, vehicles and weapons, then when the British excavated a section of trench in Flanders, they began referring to themselves as "forensic archaeologists", and then came the "conflict archaeologist" label, which seems to ,e to be merely a fancier and lengthier way of saying "military archaeologist".

                          I suppose the more proper term for a battlefield archaeologist should be "forensic conflict archaeologist", since evaluating the causes of death, as in the superb forensic exam of the Little Bighorn battle, is often part of the basic package and those examiners determined health status and problems as well as causes of death, weaponry used and even plotted paths of individuals using ballistics to match cartridge cases to individual weapons.
                          Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I did forensic accounting once. A non profit had lost track of how much money had passed through and remained in various operating & assistance funds, during the previous 18 years. It was fairly straight forward except for the two periods professional accountants had done the book keeping, & used Quickbooks.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Carl Schwamberg View Post
                              I did forensic accounting once. A non profit had lost track of how much money had passed through and remained in various operating & assistance funds, during the previous 18 years. It was fairly straight forward except for the two periods professional accountants had done the book keeping, & used Quickbooks.
                              Back in the 70s designed and wrote some forensic accounting software looking for anomalous and suspicious patterns in deposit repayments (working with the company's security manager - a former Chief Super in the Met). We found and halted a number of frauds in the sales and distribution departments.
                              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X