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Silk Escape Maps...

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  • Silk Escape Maps...

    Family relative was a Wop/AG on Halibags in WW2. He took part in the Peenamunde raid, got shot down over France, and escaped back to Blighty. He was then posted to Burma on Daks finishing the war transporting and dropping Paratroops out there.
    He brought back his silk escape map which I really should take a piccy of to add to these two...





    The long toll of the brave
    Is not lost in darkness
    Over the fruitful earth
    And athwart the seas
    Hath passed the light of noble deeds
    Unquenchable forever.

  • #2
    Silk escape maps were originally an invention of the British MI9 but later the idea was copied by the US equivalent. Silk was not easy to come by in WW2 and there were many strategic uses for it and some maps were printed on recycled condemned parachute silk. If a 'chute had been used it was often condemned so that a silk map could well have previously saved an airman's life. As the war continued rayon was used as a substitute for printing escape maps.
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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    • #3
      I highly recommend Leo Strauss' Between Silk and Cyanide for another wartime use of silk besides parachutes and escape maps.

      http://www.amazon.com/Between-Silk-C.../dp/068486780X
      Will no one tell me what she sings?--
      Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
      For old, unhappy, far-off things,
      And battles long ago:
      -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Desiree Clary View Post
        I highly recommend Leo Strauss' Between Silk and Cyanide for another wartime use of silk besides parachutes and escape maps.

        http://www.amazon.com/Between-Silk-C.../dp/068486780X
        Indeed silk also had an important medical use for specialised dressings and threads (for delicate stitches in operations). It was also used for underwear for personnel undertaking operations in extreme conditions (high altitude air sorties, underwater attacks and the like) as it kept the wearer warm without adding bulk to their attire. I've seem WW1 letters home with officers requesting their nearest and dearest to send them silk underwear for use in the trenches (may have given rise to some comment). For a similar reason aircrew took to wearing silk scarves (although one US fighter pilot reckoned that a pair of ladies silk stockings brought him better luck as well as being more fun to obtain!
        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

        Comment

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