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Japanese Cannibalism During WWII

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  • Japanese Cannibalism During WWII

    In 1944, pilots shot down over Chichi Jima Island in the Pacific were captured and executed by the Japanese before being turned into gruesome dishes for the soldiers defending the island.
    The U.S. Navy bombed and shelled the Bonin Islands from late 1944 to early 1945 in anticipation of the invasion of Iwo Jima and the eventual attack on Tokyo. One of the islands, Chichi Jima, had asmall airfield, crack anti-aircraft gunners, and communications that supported Japanese positions on other islands.
    A number of planes were shot down while attacking Chichi, including one piloted by Navy Lt. (and future President) George H. W. Bush. Bush was rescued by a submarine and was one of the few aviators to go down around Chichi and survive.
    A more grisly fate awaited at least four of the 20 Americans who bailed out near the island. Japanese defenders were led by navy Rear Adm. Kunizo Mori and army Maj. Gen. Yoshio Tachibana who approved executions and allowed cannibalism on the island.
    Tachibana, with the approval of Mori, had the American prisoners executed by beheading. The day after an early execution, a Japanese major had flesh of the executed prisoner prepared for a feast. The island doctor removed a liver and a portion of the human thigh.
    http://www.foxnews.com/us/2016/01/08...ld-war-ii.html
    Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

  • #2
    Happened a lot, actually. Col. Masanobu Tsuji had a habit of eating his enemies' livers, an act he encouraged his subordinates to participate in. He said "The more we eat, the brighter will burn the fire of our hatred for the enemy." The Japanese behaved more like animals than people.
    Divine Mercy Sunday: 4/21/2020 (https://www.thedivinemercy.org/message) The Miracle of Lanciano: Jesus' Real Presence (https://web.archive.org/web/20060831...fcontents.html)

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    • #3
      I recall seeing references to this before, but can't recall at this moment where (which book(s)). Japanese logistics policy of the war depended a large amount upon troops making use of local provisions for food. Rarely was food/rations of sufficient quantity in the supply line to forward troops, the limited 'space' given to ammo, parts, equipment, etc.

      Forward troops in areas with large land mass and local population just took it from them, the locals be damned, could fend for themselves. On smaller islands this was more a problem and the garrisons often spent much time trying to farm and fish locally to sustain themselves. Need less to say, cannibalism became a common way to not waste food resources.
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
      Present Current Events are the Future's History

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      • #4
        Justifies this.

        My worst jump story:
        My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
        As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
        No lie.

        ~
        "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
        -2 Commando Jumpmaster

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        • #5
          I believe the book is titled 'Flyboys'.

          http://www.amazon.com/Flyboys-A-True.../dp/031610728X

          The interesting part is how the author got into the mindset of the Japanese soldiers.

          Rather a grim read btw...
          Credo quia absurdum.


          Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

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          • #6
            Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
            I recall seeing references to this before, but can't recall at this moment where (which book(s)). Japanese logistics policy of the war depended a large amount upon troops making use of local provisions for food. Rarely was food/rations of sufficient quantity in the supply line to forward troops, the limited 'space' given to ammo, parts, equipment, etc.

            Forward troops in areas with large land mass and local population just took it from them, the locals be damned, could fend for themselves. On smaller islands this was more a problem and the garrisons often spent much time trying to farm and fish locally to sustain themselves. Need less to say, cannibalism became a common way to not waste food resources.
            Similar story on the Kokoda track, though there is some dispute about whether or not food supplies really had run out or not. I believe my grandfather saw some corpses that had been mutilated & it had a lasting impact on him. It also made the Australians a good deal less inclined to take prisoners.
            Human beings are the only creatures on Earth that claim a god and the only living thing that behaves like it hasn't got one - Hunter S. Thompson

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
              Justifies this.

              A lot of things justified that.........

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              • #8
                Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                I recall seeing references to this before, but can't recall at this moment where (which book(s)). Japanese logistics policy of the war depended a large amount upon troops making use of local provisions for food. Rarely was food/rations of sufficient quantity in the supply line to forward troops, the limited 'space' given to ammo, parts, equipment, etc.

                Forward troops in areas with large land mass and local population just took it from them, the locals be damned, could fend for themselves. On smaller islands this was more a problem and the garrisons often spent much time trying to farm and fish locally to sustain themselves. Need less to say, cannibalism became a common way to not waste food resources.
                Not sure if the case on Chichi Jima was about limited food resources. Seems like it was more ceremonial in this case although it's been a while since I read Flyboys so I may not be remembering correctly. I think it was about showing how dedicated and fierce these commanders were, that they'd eat the enemy's flesh etc.
                Here's something somewhat ironic: G.W. Bush was shot down in that area and if he had been less lucky he might have been eaten instead of one of the guys who were. Years later, after he became POTUS he traveled to Japan and threw up on the Prime Minister. Think of the irony.

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                • #9
                  IIRC, Peter Pinney's " Roman a Clef novel "Signaller Johnston's Secret War" cites evidence of cannibalism among the Japanese along the Kokoda Trail. My wife believes that some Viet Cong ate human hearts and liver. She always says American, but I don't believe there were ever any reports on suspected ritual cannibalism of US dead. Some Central Highland tribes had practiced it as late as the Indochina war, but I never heard any evidence of our CIDG troops engaging in the practice.
                  dit: Lirelou

                  Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

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                  • #10
                    nEW gUINEA

                    There is an account of cannibalism during the battle for New Guinea, which saw American ground forces in combat for the first time. The soldiers were primarily National Guard troops from the Pacific Northwest including the 163rd Infantry Regiment from Montana. They had been mobilized prior to Pearl Harbor and constituted the first available force sent to the Southern Pacific to protect Australia. An account of that fighting by the 163rd is found in "From Poplar to Papua: Montana's 163rd Infantry Regiment in World War II" by Martin J. Kidston
                    No one has greater love than this, to lay down one's life for one's friends John 15:13

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                    • #11
                      I'm sure there's a better source than Faux News. I remember, as a schoolboy, reading Lord Russel of Liverpool's books on Japan and Germany. He described cannibalism in his book on Japan.
                      They couldn't hit an elephant at this

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                      • #12
                        Them Japanese made for good eat'n too!

                        Late in the war, several hundred Japanese were believed killed and eaten by crocodiles when the British re-took Ramree Is.

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ramree_Island


                        "Crocodile attack"




                        Some British soldiers, including naturalist Bruce Stanley Wright who participated in the battle, claimed that the crocodiles attacked and ate numerous Japanese soldiers. Wright gave a description in Wildlife Sketches Near and Far (1962), quoted by Frank McLynn,

                        That night [of the 19 February 1945] was the most horrible that any member of the M. L. [motor launch] crews ever experienced. The scattered rifle shots in the pitch black swamp punctured by the screams of wounded men crushed in the jaws of huge reptiles, and the blurred worrying sound of spinning crocodiles made a cacophony of hell that has rarely been duplicated on earth. At dawn the vultures arrived to clean up what the crocodiles had left.... Of about one thousand Japanese soldiers that entered the swamps of Ramree, only about twenty were found alive.

                        — Wright

                        Urban myth? Dunno, still it remains a little known episode in a WWII backwater.
                        "I am Groot"
                        - Groot

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