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  • Deep shelters

    Deep shelters at Clapham are being re opened to the public http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-35228529

    Were there equivalent shelters in other European cities? Berlin perhaps?
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

  • #2
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
    Deep shelters at Clapham are being re opened to the public http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-35228529

    Were there equivalent shelters in other European cities? Berlin perhaps?
    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q...c40c5d555221o0

    Not deep but bloody massive,here is the Humboldt flak tower in Berlin,I think it was one of several.
    It housed 128mm flak guns on the roof as well as light flak and inside was shelter for bleeding thousands of Berliners.
    They were also in Hamburg I think.

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    • #3
      Has the Imperial Ubunko in Tokyo ever been opened to the public?
      Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
      Hyperwar, Whats New
      World War II Resources
      The best place in the world to "work".

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      • #4
        Originally posted by MarkV View Post
        Deep shelters at Clapham are being re opened to the public http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-35228529

        Were there equivalent shelters in other European cities? Berlin perhaps?
        Now that is a new one on me MV, the deepest shelters I remember was the Underground railway stations.Don't misunderstand I am not doubting your very interesting mail but never ever heard anyone talk of it. lcm1
        'By Horse by Tram'.


        I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
        " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
          Now that is a new one on me MV, the deepest shelters I remember was the Underground railway stations.Don't misunderstand I am not doubting your very interesting mail but never ever heard anyone talk of it. lcm1
          Two deep nuclear shelters were also built in 1944 but never opened as it was reckoned that attempting to control the rush of people trying to get into them would be impossible. Other deep and hush hush installations included deep communication centres, one of which was underneath Stormont Castle in Northern Ireland. As an electrical civil engineer my father was sent to work on this (which is how he met my mother). During the cold war he was still occasionally consulted on the building of very deep communications centres in some major British cities - I often wondered if a nuclear war had broken out who would have been left to communicate with.
          Last edited by MarkV; 12 Jan 16, 05:26.
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MarkV View Post
            Two deep nuclear shelters were also built in 1944 but never opened as it was reckoned that attempting to control the rush of people trying to get into them would be impossible. Other deep and hush hush installations included deep communication centres, one of which was underneath Stormont Castle in Northern Ireland. As an electrical civil engineer my father was sent to work on this (which is how he met my mother). During the cold war he was still occasionally consulted on the building of very deep communications centres in some major British cities - I often wondered if a nuclear war had broken out who would have been left to communicate with.
            Thanks again for the extra info MV, I had heard about the Hush Hush ones but not about the shelter ones and my Wifes family were Londoners too and I know that they used to go to the Underground stations.Possibly they were nearer. Cheers, lcm1
            'By Horse by Tram'.


            I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
            " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by lcm1 View Post
              Thanks again for the extra info MV, I had heard about the Hush Hush ones but not about the shelter ones and my Wifes family were Londoners too and I know that they used to go to the Underground stations.Possibly they were nearer. Cheers, lcm1
              The deep shelters were built near or under existing Underground stations to create more room to hold the local people. It might not have been obvious to the people taking refuge that these were new additions built at the start of the war.

              Here's the wiki article on the deep shelters:

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London...level_shelters

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              • #8
                Originally posted by NoPref View Post
                The deep shelters were built near or under existing Underground stations to create more room to hold the local people. It might not have been obvious to the people taking refuge that these were new additions built at the start of the war.

                Here's the wiki article on the deep shelters:

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London...level_shelters
                See your point but they slept on the platforms just like in the photo's that you must have seen and they have told me that they used to queue for the best spots. No mention of deep shelters. lcm1
                'By Horse by Tram'.


                I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  We have one just next door,

                  http://www.gentcement.be/2014/06/een...et-citadelpark

                  No references in English sadly,


                  .... So it's no surprise the Citadel Park was chosen in 1938 as provincial command post for the Passive Air Defence in response to the aggressive politics of the NSDAP in the run up to the second WW.

                  Sadly the bunker was nowhere near completed when the Germans invaded
                  -

                  The Germans arrived for what was essentially a tourist visit and their AA divisions happily took control of it.

                  The bunker played an important part [locally] in the war, notably on account of the nearby Leopold Barracks.

                  During the Cold War the bunker served as Nuclear and Biological Crisis Centre, with a battery of indicators screening the air for radioactive parts and traces of chemical/biological warfare.

                  At the end of the Cold War the bunker lost its [military] functions and was turned over for use by the municipal park services..
                  Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                  Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

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                  • #10
                    The Goodge Street shelter, as it was called, was not alone, upon the outbreak of war, a total of ten shelters were originally planned, five to the north of the Thames and five to the south. All of these were to eventually form part of the new Northern Line express route. The shelter's shafts were designed to prevent a direct hit from a bomb penetrating into the underground system. The two tunnels were interconnected at various places along their length, and provided two layers of accommodation. Ventilation, medical, and catering facilities were provided and electricity was obtained from two sources in case bombing caused one to fail.

                    Almost everything was thought of, in order to make these shelters as safe as possible, from double staircases in each shaft, to toilet facilities which were constructed near the lift shafts, sewage being periodically pumped up to a sewer close to the surface, storage facilities, and water being supplied from the local water supply There was even two, 3000 gallon water tanks, should the original supply fail.

                    Much thought had been put to the ventilation, especially when you consider that the shelter had been originally designed for 12,000 people, but was probably more likely to accommodate a much more sensible and comfortable, 8,000. Air entered the shelter in a normal way, through the entrances, and along the tunnels into the shelter area. Stale air was sucked out of the shelter through metal pipes through a ventilation shaft in the roof. When the fans were running at full power, the air in the shelter would be completely changed 15 times every hour. In case of a gas attack, the air was filtered, and all doors were designed with gas seals when closed.

                    With all these perfect amenities in place, what could have been better than the use of the Goodge Street shelter, as the central London headquarters, for General Eisenhower's headquarters during the second world war?
                    http://londonsstreets.blogspot.co.uk...es-street.html

                    The deep shelters do not appear to have been all built and those that were do not seem to have been used for their original purpose and were kept secret from the general public.
                    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
                      Has the Imperial Ubunko in Tokyo ever been opened to the public?
                      Recently featured on Cities of the Underworld. Berlin was, too, and revealed some deep bunkers as well as the above ground constructions.

                      I have visited Hitler's OberSalzberg bunker and a number of others during my travels, including one of the "anthill" bunkers near the railroad yards of Mainz when I was stationed there. Looks like an artillery shell standing upright.








                      Last edited by Mountain Man; 13 Jan 16, 09:41.

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                      • #12
                        Near Dover
                        http://exploring-london.com/category...ton-churchill/

                        Another tunnel system was built near Kidderminster. Someone was recently found using it as a Marijuana farm and is now housed above ground as a guest of Her Majesty.
                        Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                        Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                        • #13
                          To quote Oscar Wilde: "If this is the way that Her Majesty treats her prisoners, then she doesn't deserve to have any."

                          I have always been fascinated by the Flaktuerm.
                          Will no one tell me what she sings?--
                          Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow
                          For old, unhappy, far-off things,
                          And battles long ago:
                          -William Wordsworth, "The Solitary Reaper"

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Violet Szabo View Post
                            To quote Oscar Wilde: "If this is the way that Her Majesty treats her prisoners, then she doesn't deserve to have any."

                            I have always been fascinated by the Flaktuerm.
                            THAT I like!!! lcm1
                            'By Horse by Tram'.


                            I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                            " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

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