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Submarine Warfare of World War II documentary

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  • Submarine Warfare of World War II documentary

    A friend of mine who spent many years in the Silent Service sent this to me today, I thought there may be someone here who enjoy it .

    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

  • #2
    Thank you Sir!

    Thank you Sir!

    A documentary worthy of the definition has become a rare thing. With charts, appropriate interviews, film, and narration that provide detail and are not dumbed down. This one was excellent. My father was a World War II Submariner who served on both Pollock and Ronquil. I was a career Submarine Sailor during the Cold War. So between us we have spent a lot of time under water.
    I am currently playing a war game called “War in the Pacific, Admirals Edition” For those of you who haven’t heard of it. It is a very detailed and complex game of the entire Pacific war day for day. I am the Japanese in our game and have enjoyed considerable success so far. Now however it is early 1943 and I look forward with dread to an improved U.S. Submarine Force.
    Anyway long winded enough, thanks very much.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ANav View Post
      Thank you Sir!

      A documentary worthy of the definition has become a rare thing. With charts, appropriate interviews, film, and narration that provide detail and are not dumbed down. This one was excellent. My father was a World War II Submariner who served on both Pollock and Ronquil. I was a career Submarine Sailor during the Cold War. So between us we have spent a lot of time under water.
      I am currently playing a war game called “War in the Pacific, Admirals Edition” For those of you who haven’t heard of it. It is a very detailed and complex game of the entire Pacific war day for day. I am the Japanese in our game and have enjoyed considerable success so far. Now however it is early 1943 and I look forward with dread to an improved U.S. Submarine Force.
      Anyway long winded enough, thanks very much.
      Thank you sir! I'm glad you enjoyed it as much as I did. I have tried a few times to get a good thread going about the US Silent Service, maybe we can get it done!
      Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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      • #4
        Submarine Sailor population

        How many Submarine Sailors, or former ones, do we have here I wonder? I just joined up myself. Has anyone ever taken a count? Just a handful should have enough sea stories to keep a thread going a long time.

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        • #5
          You can find interesting discussion here
          http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=144598
          "Keep Calm. Use Less X's"

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          • #6
            The story of Lucky Fluckey.....

            This is one of the most incredible stories of the war, there are many more out there, but few can claim the only time during the war that US forces actually carried out a attack on the Japanese main land, and .....sunk a train!

            http://www.homeofheroes.com/profiles...s_fluckey.html
            Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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            • #7
              One might note that in the first 90 days of 1944, the US fast carriers sank over 1 million tons of shipping and warships pretty much erasing a Japanese naval presence from the Central Pacific.
              Carriers did in 3 months what it took the US submarine force 3 years to accomplish.

              Submarines are an effective spoiler in naval warfare. They could prosecute a Guerre de Course war of merchant raiding very effectively. A surface fleet however can effectively end enemy naval power in nearly the blink of an eye by comparison.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                One might note that in the first 90 days of 1944, the US fast carriers sank over 1 million tons of shipping and warships pretty much erasing a Japanese naval presence from the Central Pacific.
                Carriers did in 3 months what it took the US submarine force 3 years to accomplish.

                Submarines are an effective spoiler in naval warfare. They could prosecute a Guerre de Course war of merchant raiding very effectively. A surface fleet however can effectively end enemy naval power in nearly the blink of an eye by comparison.
                That is rather unfair to the submarine force who were carrying out lone wolf attacks and a wolf pack attacks far beyond the support of the US Fleet and were saddled with torpedos that routinely failed. By the time the Carriers got close enough to the main Japanese shipping lines the Submarine force had greatly limited the enemies ability to move petroleum.
                US Subs were also carrying out clandestine missions to support Phillipine resistance forces, and other behind the line forced, a mission no surface vessels could carry out.
                I also have much admiration for the carrier forces, but this OP is about the Silent Service, give them thier due, these were extraordinarly brave men carrying extremely dangerous mission, far behind enemy lines. The typical submarine commander enjoyed the freedom to carry out mission without much interference from higher command. They had no Destroyer and Cruiser escorts, no CAP, and no "eyes in the sky" .
                Last edited by Urban hermit; 06 Dec 15, 15:54.
                Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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                • #9
                  Both Japan and the United States were maritime nations when they fought each other during WWII. This means that both were trying to establish sea control. Not just use it to transport troops, or to raid.
                  As such both a successful Submarine campaign, and a Carrier Battle fleet are necessary. To imply that one or the other is more important is to miss the point of a maritime war. In the end, no matter what back water little port in the entire Pacific, a Japanese ship captain could not clear the breakwater without thinking that American eyes were watching at that very moment.

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