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  • British Censorship over the top?

    I am currently reading a book of Cecil Browns experience as a war corrispondent from his exit from Yugoslavia to Singapore and what I have read about British censorship is just jaw dropping. The censorship in Singapore is a massive shock I am currently at the point where he has his creditation taken off him and unable to report on radio for Columbia broadcasting for his fact to fact reports he handed into the censor sounds almost rediculas that it does sound like stubbon english officers. But back to topic was British censorship out of control in WW2?
    http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

  • #2
    Originally posted by 150935 View Post
    I am currently reading a book of Cecil Browns experience as a war corrispondent from his exit from Yugoslavia to Singapore and what I have read about British censorship is just jaw dropping. The censorship in Singapore is a massive shock I am currently at the point where he has his creditation taken off him and unable to report on radio for Columbia broadcasting for his fact to fact reports he handed into the censor sounds almost rediculas that it does sound like stubbon english officers. But back to topic was British censorship out of control in WW2?
    No. There was too much at stake.
    The repetition of affirmations leads to belief. Once that belief becomes a deep conviction, you better wake up and look at the facts.

    Comment


    • #3
      IMO, one of the more significant events that was not disclosed when it happened.

      The immense loss of life was such that the British government suppressed news of the disaster through the D-Notice system, but the story was broken in the United States by the New York Times and in Britain by The Scotsman on 26 July, more than five weeks after the incident. Other parts of the British press then covered the story, including the Daily Herald (also on 26 July), which carried the story on its front page, and Sunday Express on 4 August; the latter included a photograph of the capsized ship with its upturned hull lined with men under the headline "Last Moments of the Greatest Sea Tragedy of All Time", but the full story of the Lancastria never came out.[3] Due to the government-ordered cover-up, survivors and the crews of the ships that had gone to the aid of Lancastria did not discuss the disaster at the time due to the fear of court martial.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Lancastria

      News blackout
      .....
      No one will ever know the exact number who died that day - some say there were as many as 9,000 on board by the time the Lancastria was bombed, others estimate 7,000. All we do know is that around 6,000 were on board by 13.00 hrs, and that many more arrived after that. Only 2,447 arrived home.
      .....
      Churchill immediately hid the news from the public. In 1940, after Dunkirk, to reveal the truth would have been too damaging for civilian morale. He said, 'The newspapers have got quite enough disaster for today, at least.' Since that time the disaster has never been recognised for what it was - the greatest maritime disaster in Britain's history. More people were killed on the Lancastria than on the Titanic and Lusitania put together.
      http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwa...stria_01.shtml
      Last edited by At ease; 20 Dec 12, 15:46.
      "It's like shooting rats in a barrel."
      "You'll be in a barrel if you don't watch out for the fighters!"

      "Talking about airplanes is a very pleasant mental disease."
      — Sergei(son of Igor) Sikorsky, 'AOPA Pilot' magazine February 2003.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by 150935 View Post
        But back to topic was British censorship out of control in WW2?
        When it came to military matters it was strict, but outside of that sphere a reasonable amount of free speech was allowed.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by 150935 View Post
          I am currently reading a book of Cecil Browns experience as a war corrispondent from his exit from Yugoslavia to Singapore and what I have read about British censorship is just jaw dropping. The censorship in Singapore is a massive shock I am currently at the point where he has his creditation taken off him and unable to report on radio for Columbia broadcasting for his fact to fact reports he handed into the censor sounds almost rediculas that it does sound like stubbon english officers. But back to topic was British censorship out of control in WW2?
          In war time? Very hard to decide I would think.

          Where ya been mate of mine?
          "Ask not what your country can do for you"

          Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

          you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 150935 View Post
            I am currently reading a book of Cecil Browns experience as a war corrispondent from his exit from Yugoslavia to Singapore and what I have read about British censorship is just jaw dropping. The censorship in Singapore is a massive shock I am currently at the point where he has his creditation taken off him and unable to report on radio for Columbia broadcasting for his fact to fact reports he handed into the censor sounds almost rediculas that it does sound like stubbon english officers. But back to topic was British censorship out of control in WW2?
            It was extremely strict letters between service personall serving overseas and the UK were censored BOTH ways, often received letters from home full of blacked out lines! British newspapers were also very late with their news from the fronts.I remember getting home for a short while weeks after the Normandy landings,I walked into the kitchen and there was my mother sitting at the table drinking the traditional 'cuppa cha' with tears running down her face,reading the front page of the 'Daily Express' and the news was positively ancient,the photos accompanying the socalled news were obviously taken soon after the landings and bore no resemblance to the story line. lcm1
            'By Horse by Tram'.


            I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
            " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Half Pint John View Post
              In war time? Very hard to decide I would think.

              Where ya been mate of mine?
              I have just been flat out at work and the internet is capped so yeah been difficult to get on here lol
              http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dutched View Post
                No. There was too much at stake.
                I'll tell you another thing regarding censorship between serving forces overseas and home BOTH ways,not only did the mail go through the official channels but it was also double checked by an officer of the battalion.I know that because the mail had the officers stamp and signature on the OPEN envelope.I assume that if he had a bad night on the 'Turps' the night before the mail got a caning!! lcm1
                'By Horse by Tram'.


                I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                Comment


                • #9
                  Cecil Brown was an American, so the British authorities in Singapore would no doubt have treated him as a foreigner, someone to be rather wary of in the first instance. If he had been critical of them, then I expect it would have been "Beware! Untrustworthy alien ahoy! Not British!" and a general lack of co-operation at best. If he had been critical - and been proved right - then it would be a case of "Burn the witch!" except with no burning.

                  You rarely make friends when pointing out failings!

                  On the wider censorship issue, the BBC was seen as a touchstone of impartial and unbiased reporting, which it was, except where it wasn't. I trust this has resolved the whole issue. Ooh, I feel all *Lodestar*!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rob Connolly View Post
                    Cecil Brown was an American, so the British authorities in Singapore would no doubt have treated him as a foreigner, someone to be rather wary of in the first instance. If he had been critical of them, then I expect it would have been "Beware! Untrustworthy alien ahoy! Not British!" and a general lack of co-operation at best. If he had been critical - and been proved right - then it would be a case of "Burn the witch!" except with no burning.

                    You rarely make friends when pointing out failings!

                    On the wider censorship issue, the BBC was seen as a touchstone of impartial and unbiased reporting, which it was, except where it wasn't. I trust this has resolved the whole issue. Ooh, I feel all *Lodestar*!
                    A strong basis of truth in that little lot Rob! lcm1
                    'By Horse by Tram'.


                    I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                    " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The long toll of the brave
                      Is not lost in darkness
                      Over the fruitful earth
                      And athwart the seas
                      Hath passed the light of noble deeds
                      Unquenchable forever.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Rob Connolly in lock-step with lodestar

                        Originally posted by Rob Connolly View Post
                        Cecil Brown was an American, so the British authorities in Singapore would no doubt have treated him as a foreigner, someone to be rather wary of in the first instance. If he had been critical of them, then I expect it would have been "Beware! Untrustworthy alien ahoy! Not British!" and a general lack of co-operation at best. If he had been critical - and been proved right - then it would be a case of "Burn the witch!" except with no burning.

                        You rarely make friends when pointing out failings!

                        On the wider censorship issue, the BBC was seen as a touchstone of impartial and unbiased reporting, which it was, except where it wasn't. I trust this has resolved the whole issue. Ooh, I feel all *Lodestar*!
                        Quite so! And when one has resolved an issue one can simply say something along the lines of:
                        "As it has been written by Rob Connolly, let it be thus be as Rob Connolly has written."

                        You'll soon get the hang of it. Simply let let others present their cases and debate the issues then issue a concise and insightful conculsion which cannot be contradicted.
                        As a tagline you are welcome to use variations on the many I use. For example:

                        "One must cross the threshold of greatness. Then and only then can one comprehend the true nature of the one called Rob Connolly - for many the quest to cross that threshold becomes their life’s work.”

                        “When Rob Connolly does not post many peoples’ lives feel desolate and empty.
                        When Rob Connolly posts many people find a fresh reason to go on living.
                        Over the years this has become known as ‘THE WAY OF ROB CONNOLY"

                        "There are few certainties in life or in the world, but that Rob Connolly will end up in an unmarked, shallow grave in a desolate, forsaken, wind-blown corner of a remote, barren and unknown land, is surely one of them”


                        Just practice mate.
                        Merry Christmas and a happy New Year.

                        Regards lodestar

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