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Was there virtually NO AID among the Germans and Japanese

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  • Was there virtually NO AID among the Germans and Japanese

    One of the things of pop culture History books and popular media is that while the Japanese and Germans were technically Allies in World War 2, there was no actual direct aid between the two in the war.

    The popular view is that they practically fought their own wars in their own fronts without any mutual support to each other.

    However everything I seen on pop culture history that the Germans aided the Italians. I'm going to create another thread because it would go off-topic if I post the details what I learned about the Italians in WW2.

    I understand the distance was so faaaar away that direct shipment of resources was impossible. But didn't they at least share possible plans and technological projects?

    Popular media portrays it as though Germany and Japan were in complete isolation and fought their own wars without cooperation!
    Last edited by Pisces Adonis; 03 Dec 12, 12:38.

  • #2
    Where did the Japanese get the plans for a jet that looked a lot like and ME 262?
    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

    youre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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    • #3
      Yeah, well, geography had a way of making that happen. Does that mean they were completely void of assisting each other? No but the assistance rendered was minimal.

      In addition to geography is the reality that each of them, the Japanese and the ratzis, were more concerned about accomplishing individual goals than shared ones. Cooperation was more a matter of convenience than a true commitment to a common cause.

      Regards,
      Dennis
      If stupid was a criminal offense Sea Lion believers would be doing life.

      Shouting out to Half Pint for bringing back the big mugs!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Pisces Adonis View Post
        One of the things of pop culture History books and popular media is that while the Japanese and Germans were technically Allies in World War 2, there was no actual direct aid between the two in the war.

        The popular view is that they practically fought their own wars in their own fronts without any mutual support to each other.

        However everything I seen on pop culture history that the Germans aided the Italians. I'm going to create another thread because it would go off-topic if I post the details what I learned about the Italians in WW2.

        I understand the distance was so faaaar away that direct shipment of resources was impossible. But didn't they at least share possible plans and technological projects?

        Popular media portrays it as though Germany and Japan were in complete isolation and fought their own wars without cooperation!
        The two Axis partners sent alot of kit and blue prints back and forth throughout the war, via submarines, blockade running freighters and some long range aircraft that flew nonstop from Europe to Japanese occupied China. In the closing days of the war in Europe, Germany sent a long range U-Boat along with tons of equipment, blueprints, raw materials and technicians to Japan.
        "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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        • #5
          The USSR and Japan had a non-Aggression Pact in effect from 15 April 1941 until 9 August 1945 (8 August in Wash DC) when the USSR declared war on Japan.

          Up until then, both countries found it to their advantage to adhere to the terms of this treaty, which was supposed to be in effect for five years. Thus, when Germany invaded the USSR, the Japanese sat on the sidelines. Their concern was to have enough troops and material for their war in the Pacific and Southeast Asia. You might want to take a look at the Japanese view of their Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere. What's important is not what we thought of it, but rather what the Japanese thought of it, as it guided their war aims.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater...sperity_Sphere
          dit: Lirelou

          Phong trần mi một lưỡi gươm, Những loi gi o ti cơm s g!

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          • #6
            Originally posted by lirelou View Post
            The USSR and Japan had a non-Aggression Pact in effect from 15 April 1941 until 9 August 1945 (8 August in Wash DC) when the USSR declared war on Japan.
            On April 5, 1945 the Soviet Union officially withdrew from the pact, however legally it was bound to abide by it until April 1946. It must be noted that upon declaring Soviet unilateral withdrawal, Molotov stated that "de-facto, the Soviet-Japanese relations will revert to their pre-Pact status", which made it clear the Soviet side was not going to be stopped by legal considerations in case it wanted to delare war on Japan before the end of the Pact's official term. Throughout the war, despite several incidents, both sides adhered to it. The Soviet Union kept selling oil from Sakhalin to the Japanese and interned American planes which landed on its territory.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soviet%...eutrality_Pact
            www.histours.ru

            Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

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            • #7
              The Germans and Japanese carried out joint operations in the Indian Ocean, and there were the Yanagi missions where Japanese submarines sailed to Europe and traded tech and some resources. It was all limited but certainly occurred. There were attempts at mutual support but geography and METT-T got in the way.
              Кто там?
              Это я - Почтальон Печкин!
              Tunis is a Carthigenian city!

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              • #8
                See

                http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/utils...ename/1858.pdf

                and

                http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/utils...lename/865.pdf
                hmmm . . . I wonder what THIS button does . . . uh oh

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                • #9
                  Well Japs got some German projects... But they didnt stay there for too long...
                  "Give me 100 000 croatian soldiers and I will conqure all world" - Napoleon Bonaparte

                  Soldiers are coming and leaving while war will never end.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hansika View Post
                    Well Japs got some German projects... But they didnt stay there for too long...
                    JAPANESE please. Here Japs is considered racist
                    "Ask not what your country can do for you"

                    Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

                    youre entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ShAA View Post
                      The Soviet Union kept selling oil from Sakhalin to the Japanese and interned American planes which landed on its territory.
                      Very interesting, naturally that was the USSR's right to intern American planes engaged in combat operations against Japan-which makes me wonder what would happen hypothetically if say a Japanese sub somehow ended up in Soviet European (say the Baltic or Norway) waters and was spotted by Soviet forces would they be in there rights to attack it? It might have been carrying supplies or the like for the Germans. What if it was accompanied by German units?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Pisces Adonis View Post
                        I understand the distance was so faaaar away that direct shipment of resources was impossible. But didn't they at least share possible plans and technological projects?
                        They did share stuff. I'm sure others, by now, have provided plenty of documentation. I'll reply if i see anything missing.
                        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                        What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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                        • #13
                          Interesting study of a failed Uboat (U-864) attempting to go to Japan with parts, mercury and experten. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_submarine_U-864
                          Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                          "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                          What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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                          • #14
                            Don't forget the S.S. Automedon affair.

                            http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...7&postcount=69

                            The intelligence provided by the Germans to the Japanese was valued so highly that Kapitan zur See Bernhard Rogge of the disguised raider Atlantis was rewarded with an ornate Samurai sword; the only other Germans so honoured were Hermann Gring and Field Marshal Erwin Rommel.
                            Last edited by At ease; 03 Dec 12, 18:54.
                            "It's like shooting rats in a barrel."
                            "You'll be in a barrel if you don't watch out for the fighters!"

                            "Talking about airplanes is a very pleasant mental disease."
                            Sergei(son of Igor) Sikorsky, 'AOPA Pilot' magazine February 2003.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by At ease View Post
                              Don't forget the S.S. Automedon affair.

                              http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...7&postcount=69

                              The intelligence provided by the Germans to the Japanese was valued so highly that Kapitan zur See Bernhard Rogge of the disguised raider Atlantis was rewarded with an ornate Samurai sword; the only other Germans so honoured were Hermann Gring and Field Marshal Erwin Rommel.
                              That was the one I remembered the story, but not which Raider and merchant ship.
                              Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                              "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                              What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                              Comment

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