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Baker's Dozen (WWI Edition)

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  • McMax
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash
    2. ANZAC Mounted Division
    3. Venereal Disease
    4. Colonel William George Malone
    5. Imperial Camel Corps
    6. Villers Bretonneux memorial


    7.William Birdwood



    British Indian Army officer who organized the ANZAC in Egypt and led it at Gallipoli and in France.

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  • PGT Beauregard
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash
    2. ANZAC Mounted Division
    3. Venereal Disease
    4. Colonel William George Malone
    5. Imperial Camel Corps

    6. Villers Bretonneux memorial



    Last edited by PGT Beauregard; 31 Mar 17, 04:50.

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  • broderickwells
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash
    2. ANZAC Mounted Division
    3. Venereal Disease
    4. Colonel William George Malone

    5. Imperial Camel Corps

    The Imperial Camel Corps Brigade (ICCB) was a camel-mounted infantry brigade that the British Empire raised in December 1916 during the First World War for service in the Middle East.

    From a small beginning the unit eventually grew to a brigade of four battalions, one battalion each from Great Britain and New Zealand and two battalions from Australia. Support troops included a mountain artillery battery, a machine gun squadron, Royal Engineers, a field ambulance, and an administrative train.

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  • Crackshot
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash
    2. ANZAC Mounted Division
    3. Venereal Disease

    4. Colonel William George Malone

    Commander of the Wellington Battalion (New Zealand) at Gallipoli, he was Mentioned in Dispatches twice. Famous for capturing the heights at Chunuk Bair, he was killed by friendly artillery fire during the battle. Chunuk Bair was lost two days later when the Turkish overran the British relief force.

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  • slick_miester
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash
    2. ANZAC Mounted Division

    3. Venereal Disease

    Insert image of your choice here.

    Naturally I was going for the smart-assed entry, like lice, but I just happened upon the fact that 11% of ANZACS (60,000 cases among 518,950 Australian and New Zealander personnel) were diagnosed with venereal disease before separation.

    If the ANZACS were anything like their American counterparts, the only 4% of the wartime VD contractions occurred after induction, such was the poor state of military VD diagnosis at the start of WW1.

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  • McMax
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash

    2. ANZAC Mounted Division



    Saw action in Sinai, Gaza, Palestine.

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  • slick_miester
    replied
    Baker's Dozen for ANZACS

    1. John Monash

    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson
    7. Pogey Rope
    8. Statue of Liberty Division
    9. The Fighting 69th
    10. George S. Patton
    11. Sgt. Henry Gunther
    12. Hunter Liggett

    13. Dan Daly

    Come on, you sons of bitches, do you want to live forever? - Sgt Maj Dan Daly, USMC, at Belleau Wood, July 1918




    He's buried just a stone's throw from my childhood home.

    Leave a comment:


  • McMax
    replied

    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1



    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson
    7. Pogey Rope
    8. Statue of Liberty Division
    9. The Fighting 69th
    10. George S. Patton
    11. Sgt. Henry Gunther

    12.Hunter Liggett



    General Liggett commanded the First Corp and First Army of the AEF during the war and is considered one of WW1's better commanders.

    Leave a comment:


  • Khryses
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson
    7. Pogey Rope
    8. Statue of Liberty Division
    9. The Fighting 69th
    10. George S. Patton in front of Renault Tank

    11. Sgt. Henry Gunther

    Henry Nicholas John Gunther (June 6, 1895 – November 11, 1918) was an American soldier and the last soldier of any of the belligerents to be killed during World War I. He was killed at 10:59 a.m., one minute before the Armistice was to take effect at 11 a.m

    Leave a comment:


  • PGT Beauregard
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson
    7. Pogey Rope
    8. Statue of Liberty Division
    9. The Fighting 69th

    10. George S. Patton in front of Renault Tank


    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson
    7. Pogey Rope
    8. Statue of Liberty Division

    Going all New York on me I see.

    9. The Fighting 69th





    That's from the facade of their armory on Lexington Avenue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Crackshot
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson
    7. Pogey Rope[/b]

    8. Statue of Liberty Division



    Officially, the 77th Infantry Division. The famous Lost Battalion was composed of companies from the 307th and 308th Regiments.

    Leave a comment:


  • slick_miester
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls
    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson

    7. Pogey Rope



    During World War I, the French Government awarded decorations for especially meritorious conduct in action to 156 American units varying in size from a section to a brigade. These decorations were: the Fourragere and the Croix de Guerre (Cross of War) with various combinations of palms, gilt, silver, and bronze star devices.

    The unit twice decorated with the Croix de Guerre with Palms was entitled to a braided and knotted cord, known as the Fourragere, in the green and red colors of the Croix de Guerre. The Fourragere becomes part of the uniform of the unit so cited, authorizing all members of the organization to wear the decoration on the left shoulder of the uniform as long as they remain members of the organization. . . . .

    In 1918, Marines of the Fifth and Sixth Regiments, by their heroic deeds of valor, inscribed the names of momentous and brilliant battles on the pages of Marine Corps history, as well as on their own regimental battle colors. They have the single honor of being the only two regiments in the American Expeditionary Force to receive three citations--two in the Orders of the Army and one in the Orders of the Corps--the Fourragere and the Croix de Guerre with two Palms and one Gilt Star. As a member of Second Battalion, Sixth Marines we are authorized to wear the Fourragere as a part of our uniform. Marines originally earned this award as an individual decoration through their heroism, bloodshed, and ultimate sacrifice on the fields of Belleau Wood, Soissons, and Champagne. Since World War I, Marines and Sailors of 2d Battalion, 6th Marines have worn the Fourragere as a unit decoration carrying it into battle at Guadalcanal, Tarawa, Okinawa and many other battles, which are listed in this website's article, "Battalion History."

    This braided rope and spike embodies and recalls the courageous conduct and fighting spirit of Marines and Sailors who have gone before us. It marks us as warriors, a proud battalion, and a grand regiment. Wear the Fourragere with pride, dignity, and honor and remember always in whose footsteps you tread. . . . .

    "The French Fourragere: Why we wear it," 6th Marines-dot-mil

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  • Crackshot
    replied
    Baker's Dozen of the USA in WW 1

    1. Plattsburgh Camps
    2. M1917 Enfield
    3. Black Tom
    4. Rock of the Marne
    5. Hello Girls

    6. Henry "Black Death" Johnson

    One of only two African-American soldiers awarded the Medal of Honor for World War One, he fought off a German raiding party, suffering 21 rounds in the process. He wasn't awarded the medal until 2015, 86 years after he died.

    The President of the United States of America, authorized by Act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded in the name of Congress the Medal of Honor to
    Private Henry Johnson
    United States Army
    For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty:
    Private Johnson distinguished himself by acts of gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty while serving as a member of Company C, 369th Infantry Regiment, 93rd Division, American Expeditionary Forces, during combat operations against the enemy on the front lines of the Western Front in France on May 15, 1918. Private Johnson and another soldier were on sentry duty at a forward outpost when they received a surprise attack from a German raiding party consisting of at least 12 soldiers. While under intense enemy fire and despite receiving significant wounds, Private Johnson mounted a brave retaliation, resulting in several enemy casualties. When his fellow soldier was badly wounded, Private Johnson prevented him from being taken prisoner by German forces. Private Johnson exposed himself to grave danger by advancing from his position to engage an enemy soldier in hand-to-hand combat. Wielding only a knife and gravely wounded himself, Private Johnson continued fighting and took his Bolo knife and stabbed it through an enemy soldier’s head. Displaying great courage, Private Johnson held back the enemy force until they retreated. Private Johnson’s extraordinary heroism and selflessness above and beyond the call of duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of military service and reflect great credit upon himself, his unit and the United States Army.

    Leave a comment:

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