Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What do you think about on Remembrance Day?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What do you think about on Remembrance Day?

    I don't know if this has been asked before but bof.

    Since ANZAC Day is fast approaching, my school just conducted an official day of remembrance the Friday before ANZAC Day on Sunday. During the minute of silence I noted some students staring off into the distance aloofly and I started to wonder what exactly was going on through their heads. Were they actually caring and thinking about what this day is about or were they just taking advantage of the moment of silence to envisage what they would be doing as a **** up on the ANZAC Day public holiday on Monday? I thought 'What wankers. It must be people like these that are going to make us forget in about a hundred years time' but then it occurred to me- wouldn't the veterans have liked for us to be happy and to enjoy ANZAC Day in happiness and laughter that they had fought for us to have as a privilege rather than in sadness in mourning? This really confused me and ever since I have been confused about what I should be thinking in my head whilst the Last Post or Reveille is playing and in the minute of silence. Always during the Last Post, Reveille and the minute of silence I picture in my head the images and video of the veterans in all wars during the 20th Century (mainly WW1 and WW2) having fun and just messing about in unison with background music of the opening song in the movie 'Saving Private Ryan'. I don't know if this is what I should be thinking about. What do you guys think about when you pause on Remembrance Day for a minute's silence?

  • #2
    Sometimes I think about the great-uncle of mine who died on The Somme. Many times I just forget until the hour has long passed. The important thing to me is that we do remember, and not just on Remembrance Sunday, what our forefathers fought for, why they fought, where they died (or survived), and the futility of war itself.
    Signing out.

    Comment


    • #3
      So do you think about your great uncle in combat or do you think about the times that you spent with him?

      Comment


      • #4
        I think about my relatives that fought in various wars around the world - most I never met and therefore don't really have a picture going through my mind. I also make sure to call my Dad and let him know how proud I am of him for serving!
        "War is sorrowful, but there is one thing infinitely more horrible than the worst horrors of war, and that is the feeling that nothing is worth fighting for..."
        -- Harper's Weekly, December 31, 1864

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Kittikhun View Post
          So do you think about your great uncle in combat or do you think about the times that you spent with him?
          He died long before I was born. I think of him under fire in a trench or foxhole, somehow being representative of the utter futility of that most pointless of conflicts, The Great War.
          Signing out.

          Comment


          • #6
            I think about the mass graves, the thousand yard stare, but also the smiles on the faces when coming home on the ships and the long embraces from their loved ones.

            Now and then I think of a poem by Siegfried Sassoon, called 'Aftermath'.
            Have you forgotten yet?...
            For the world's events have rumbled on since those gagged days,
            Like traffic checked while at the crossing of city-ways:
            And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flow
            Like clouds in the lit heaven of life; and you're a man reprieved to go,
            Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare.
            But the past is just the same--and War's a bloody game...
            Have you forgotten yet?...
            Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you'll never forget.

            Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz--
            The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets?
            Do you remember the rats; and the stench
            Of corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench--
            And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain?
            Do you ever stop and ask, 'Is it all going to happen again?'

            Do you remember that hour of din before the attack--
            And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you then
            As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men?
            Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching back
            With dying eyes and lolling heads--those ashen-grey
            Masks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

            Have you forgotten yet?...
            Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you'll never forget.
            "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
            Ernest Hemingway.

            "We're all going to die, all of us; what a circus! That alone should make us love each other, but it doesn't. We are terrorised and flattened by trivialities."
            Bukowski

            Comment


            • #7
              Lest We Forget

              Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
              I think about the mass graves, the thousand yard stare, but also the smiles on the faces when coming home on the ships and the long embraces from their loved ones.

              Now and then I think of a poem by Siegfried Sassoon, called 'Aftermath'.
              Have you forgotten yet?...
              For the world's events have rumbled on since those gagged days,
              Like traffic checked while at the crossing of city-ways:
              And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flow
              Like clouds in the lit heaven of life; and you're a man reprieved to go,
              Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare.
              But the past is just the same--and War's a bloody game...
              Have you forgotten yet?...
              Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you'll never forget.

              Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz--
              The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets?
              Do you remember the rats; and the stench
              Of corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench--
              And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain?
              Do you ever stop and ask, 'Is it all going to happen again?'

              Do you remember that hour of din before the attack--
              And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you then
              As you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men?
              Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching back
              With dying eyes and lolling heads--those ashen-grey
              Masks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?

              Have you forgotten yet?...
              Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you'll never forget.

              YES……. Very Good
              Lest We Forget

              Think of those that gave up their tomorrows for our today the ones that gave up their innocents and youth for our today.



              “Attack with aggression, but always have a plan of retreat”

              Comment


              • #8
                Does any one knowe that when Austrlaia celebrates ANZAC day,does the Britisch and Amiricans knowe about this and do they help celebrate aswelle?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Heidi View Post
                  Does any one knowe that when Austrlaia celebrates ANZAC day,does the Britisch and Amiricans knowe about this and do they help celebrate aswelle?
                  Yes Heidi, British ex service men and women migrants in Australia take part,I belong to the Royal Marine association and we marched on Anzac day, in Perth W.A. which was Yesterday (Sunday) it is a big thing in Australia, a national holiday, thousands turn out to watch and cheer in every village, town and City, cheers, Lcm1.
                  'By Horse by Tram'.


                  I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                  " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    an vet that marched...

                    The Aussie alliances for Briton and US,must be welle respected!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think first about my relatives who fought, some of them fell, in WWI and WWII but also before that. Than I think about everyone who had to fight in WWI and WWII making no difference about nationality or ethnic background. I only know remembrence day from my time in England. In Germany, as far as I know, we don't have a day to remember our soldiers who have fallen during the wars.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I think of my Great-grandfathers who fought in the Great War. I think of the other Soldiers and their struggles, and sacrifices. I give thanks for what their sacrifices have allowed not only for me but so many others in the world to achieve.
                        I think on the Debt owed to them, and which is ever unpayable.

                        In Truth: "Never have so many owed so much to so few"

                        BoRG
                        "... and that was the last time they called me Freakboy Moses"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Remembrance Day.

                          What I think of mainly is the old lad who used to attend the Parade. One of the last world war one veterans still capapble of attending and taking part in the parade.

                          He would arrive in a wheel chair pushed by what looked like one of his Grandaughters if not a great grand daughter, I remember her because she had enough facial piercings to make her face look like sunrise over a scrap yard.

                          When the parade assembled he would, with much puffing grunting and more than a little bit of help rise from his chair and with the aid of a walking stick to correct the starbord list from his medals limp painfully to the front. With half the servicemen present watching trying to figure out if he was going to drop dead on the spot from the effort.

                          He would remain wavering in the wind at a position that vaugly resembled attention eyes blinking, nose running, the god botherer would conduct the service and by now half the parade is watching the old lad waver and wondering if its going to turn into a funeral.

                          Then the service would finish and the band would strike up for the march down the high street and something really odd used to happen. The old lad would snap to attention, his walking stick would be pulled up to the shoulder arms position and on the command he'd right turn and march off with the parade, down the street he'd go not a limp to be seen, back straight, head back arm at a ninty degree angle to the ground, for the length of that march and while the band was playing he was eighteen again and I am pretty sure that in his head he wasnt marching with us but with his comrades.

                          Then the parade would halt, we'd fall out and he'd stand there and you could see him getting old again while his carer got the wheel chair ready for him. Then off he went in the chair. he was there for three or four years that I can remember and then one year he wasnt any more. Presumbably he's drilling on gods parade ground now. I never knew his name or what he had done in the war but, amoung my family members, he's the one I remember.
                          "Sometimes its better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness" T Pratchett

                          Comment

                          Latest Topics

                          Collapse

                          Working...
                          X