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  • Thoughts on Woodrow Wilson

    This is from one of my other posts. I wanted to discuss Wilson in a appropriate section.

    Woodrow Wilson was a man of beautiful integrity and honor. We can compare him to world leaders of his time and imo he comes out as one of the best if not the best leader of his time. Wilson spoke and acted as a gentleman.

    Wilson fought corruption in the state of New Jersey as Gov and then fought corruption in the workplace as president that was one of his great accomplishments among many. Of course in 1919 Mr. Wilson won the Nobel peace prize...

    Wilson successfully ended child labor in the United States and fought for the eight hour workday for the workingman. So this is a man to look up to as a hero indeed and it is why he was honored with so many statues and buildings named after him right here in the United States. Of course one may disagree all they want with praising Wilson....his glory will stand imo.

    Woodrow Wilson is a winner.. leading the allies in World War I to help defeat the central powers.


    Wilson was also gave women the right to vote one of the great accomplishments in American history when it comes to social justice.


    Woodrow Wilson the great American Hero


    -Ended child labor

    -Fought corruption in the workplace

    - Nobel peace prize winner

    -Led The Allies in Ww1

    - Gave women the right to vote
    Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
    Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

    George S Patton

  • #2
    An inaccurate whitewashing post that is more hero worship than history.
    Zero attempt at research or sourcing so essentially worthless as anything but one fan’s opinion.

    Comment


    • #3
      Have to disagree, SJ. Wilson betrayed the national will of the people by involving us in a foreign war in direct contradiction to his sworn promise not to.

      I've often wondered what history would be like if presidents kept their promises and actually represented the will of the nation and not their own personal politics. How would history have progressed if America stayed out of WWI and an exhausted Europe fought to the bitter end?

      As for the Nobel Peace Prize, that was once something noteworthy, but since Obama got one for doing nothing the value of the Nobel has been shown to be worthless.

      I have always regarded Wilson as a reactive president, his decisions largely forced upon him by developing events, rather than a pro-active president whose decisions led the way for events that followed.
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

      Comment


      • #4
        Have you read the book by Freud S. and W. Bullitt; President T.W. Wilson ?

        Comment


        • #5
          Wilson’s 14 points is still taught in high schools to this very day. Wilson was a man of liberal and Democratic values. He was able to help convince the central powers to agree to armistance terms because of how favorable the terms were to even the defeated powers of World War I. Other powers such as France wanted to brutally punish Germany.

          The 14 points also called for fair treatment of original inhabitants of the colonies of various European powers.

          All throughout this board figures such as George Washington and Abraham Lincoln are praised up and down. Woodrow Wilson may not be as commemorated As those great American but he is certainly up there in terms of one of history’s great leaders.

          Wilson was a man of idealism and high values. His concept of the league of Nations ultimately led to the creation of the United Nations. The UN is supposed to guarantee world peace and stability. It may be that leaders of the UN have or will fail but if its ideals are put fourth correctly It would make for a much much better world.

          https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.his...-points-speech


          Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
          Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

          George S Patton

          Comment


          • #6
            In 1944 a great film was put out depicting the life of Woodrow Wilson. It was titled Wilson it is a must see for anybody interested in American history and the life of Woodrow Wilson.. The film was critically acclaimed and scores around a 90% rating on rotten tomatoes


            Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
            Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

            George S Patton

            Comment


            • #7
              https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=3EP14wD7g88&t=6031s

              FDR had the film screened at the White House in 1944 as World War II was raging on. Wilson was one of the men that Roosevelt looked up to. Like Roosevelt, Wilson had to deal with a handicap. Toward the end of his life Wilson became paralyzed but It did not stop him from leading his country.

              Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
              Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

              George S Patton

              Comment


              • #8


                I posted this elsewhere and will include here wrt the 1944 film "Wilson"



                As one line in the film by Alexander Knox starring as Wilson says... The fights just began, the ideals of the League is not dead just because a few obstructive men say they are...the dream of a world united against the awful wastes of war is to deeply embedded in the hearts of men everywhere.

                Here is one of the great films of the 20th century earning numerous Academy Awards as well as the admiration of FDR. Alexander Knox stars as President Wilson in a very motivational piece of art. A hesitant Wilson is urged by his wife and 3 daughters to run for political office. From the beginning we see how Wilson transitions from President of Princeton University to Governor of NJ and within a mere two years President of the USA. As an underdog at the 1912 Democratic National Convention Wilson climbed uphill to defeat the favorite the Speaker of The House Champ Clark. Followed by defeating a great American in the 1912 Presidential election, Theodore Roosevelt.

                One of my favorite scenes of the film starts at the 43:00 mark. We see Wilson running for POTUS in the 1912 election...telling fellow countrymen about equality, fighting workplace corruption, following in the footsteps of Lincoln, how as the future unfolds that the USA will lead the world , put human rights above all other rights.


                Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                George S Patton

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                  Have to disagree, SJ. Wilson betrayed the national will of the people by involving us in a foreign war in direct contradiction to his sworn promise not to.

                  I've often wondered what history would be like if presidents kept their promises and actually represented the will of the nation and not their own personal politics. How would history have progressed if America stayed out of WWI and an exhausted Europe fought to the bitter end?

                  As for the Nobel Peace Prize, that was once something noteworthy, but since Obama got one for doing nothing the value of the Nobel has been shown to be worthless.

                  I have always regarded Wilson as a reactive president, his decisions largely forced upon him by developing events, rather than a pro-active president whose decisions led the way for events that followed.
                  The Zimmerman telegram changed the game wrt US involvement in the war.

                  Originally posted by daddut roger View Post
                  Have you read the book by Freud S. and W. Bullitt; President T.W. Wilson ?
                  Not sure whom this is addressed toward..but I have not read the book you mention.

                  What is your opinion of Wilson if I may ask?
                  Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                  Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                  George S Patton

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    In the book by Freud and Bullitt, we have before us a president engaging in 1917 the United States in war, leading the Peace Conference in Paris in 1919, but yielding without fighting to the demands of the Allies. The man was, on the one hand committed to defending a just peace for all the people and, on the other hand, neglected to take into account the real goals of war of the British and French leaders. He knew that the latter were bound by secret agreements, incompatible with his own promises, but he preferred to forget it and dream of an equitable peace. So "always delighted 'to avoid trouble', he missed the opportunity to conclude the just peace he dreamed of".

                    Wilson, although he never succeeded in "emptying with Balfour the question of secret agreements [...] expressed in all his speeches the assurance that he would obtain a just and lasting peace at the end of the war, and affirmed time and again the friendship he felt for the German people and his conviction that defeat would bring them not suffering but benefits. "

                    In January 1918, he gave a speech to the Congress in which he enumerated the 14 points which became the basis of the armistice and the Treaty of Versailles, but, concretely, he had no knowledge of Europe, not even the most elementary notions of geography.

                    Freud and Bullitt write that "he deeply believed that he could hoist war, by the power of his verb, to the level of the crusade for the application of the principles of the Sermon on the Mount". Wilson spoke more and more as if he were Christ and turned away from the expansionist aims of his allies. He resisted pressure from those around him to demand that they commit to the goals of war. But before the Peace Conference started, he told his secretary, "I believe in Divine Providence. If I didn't have faith, I would go crazy."

                    During the Conference, Wilson was never able to face Lloyd George and Clemenceau directly, but, in plenary session, he was able to make this kind of speech: "This war caused many misfortunes, gentlemen, but also very beautiful things. Evil has been conquered and the rest of the world has become aware, as never before, of the majesty of good ... The miasmas of distrust and intrigue are dispelled. Men look each other in the eyes and say: 'We are brothers ... '. " When he allowed England and France to annex all the German colonies, he insisted that a moral veil, called "mandate", cover each annexation. During the spring of 1919 when the Peace Conference was held, Wilson, having rejected his most faithful collaborators, continued to compromise in order to finally accept all the demands of the Allies, such as those on the war reparations which ruined the economic life of the 'Europe. "From then on, Wilson's descent to the Treaty of Versailles was rapid." He compromised on the question of the Saar, annexed by France, on the occupation of the Rhineland and on other important points. At the most favorable moment, he refused to deal with the Russian question. Freud and Bullitt describe precisely how during these days, Wilson yields and lets dismantle Germany for the future misfortune of the peoples of Europe. He gets depressed, isolates himself, is sick but turns his head away each time from the consequences of his actions and justifies them afterwards by fallacies which allow him to continue to identify with Jesus Christ, redeemer of humanity.

                    In May 1919 Bullitt, who was a member of the American delegation, resigned from this office and wrote to the president:
                    "... our government has agreed to deliver the suffering peoples of the world to new oppressions, subjugations and dismemberments, to a century of future wars .... The unjust decisions of the Conference with regard to the Shantung [Chinese Province ceded in Japan], Tyrol, Thrace, Hungary, East Prussia, Danzig, the Saar Valley, and the abandonment of the principle of freedom of the seas, make new conflicts inevitable ... Everyone is aware that you personally objected to most of these unjust provisions, and that you accepted them only under the pressure of the circumstances. I am convinced, however, that if you had waged your struggle in the open, not behind closed doors, you would have had with you the world opinion, which was yours; you could have resisted the pressures and established the 'new international order, based on the liberal and universal principles of good and justice' of which you spoke to us ... "

                    Wilson is then a champion of peace who collapses and quarrels with Poincaré on trifles, a "Prince of Peace" who sows the seeds of wars and future oppressions.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Domestically Wilson was an enthusiastic supporter of Jim Crow and segregation and expanded segregation into the Federal establishment. He admired the KKK.

                      https://www.theatlantic.com/politics...racism/417549/

                      On the war he allowed Germany to get off easy, France in particular wanted a treaty more akin to that inflected on France in 1871. A more severe Versailles, possibly with Germany losing more territory or being broken up would have made ww2 less likely. Versailles would have been much more severe if Wilson had taken a less prominent role.

                      "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        The only problem with the Versailles Treaty...was that it wasn't enforced to the hilt. Germany invaded France...not the other way around. When the war ended, much of the north eastern sectors of French agriculture and industry was remade into a lunar landscape. What was not destroyed, the Germans stripped and took back with them. Wilson would have allowed Germany to get away with slap on the back of the hand. Two interwar treaties designed to alleviate reparations from Germany failed as well as A- Germany never intended to abide by any treaty they put their signature on...and B- American businesses were eager to reopen German markets.

                        Clemenceau should have grabbed Wilson by the nose and dragged him through the mud at Verdun and elsewhere then set him back on his ship to the US. Wilson exerted a high-minded arrogance which immediately annoyed his counterparts during the talks. Clemenceau and Foch had actually discussed the possibility of dismembering Germany to it's pre-Bismarck state. The only negative side effect of something like this, would have been easy political victories for Bolshevik-leaning politicians. Germany, or at least parts of it, could have possibly gone Red.
                        You'll live, only the best get killed.

                        -General Charles de Gaulle

                        Comment


                        • #13


                          Wilson suffering in pain from a paralysis providing this historic speech,

                          Woodrow Wilson 1923 Radio Address - Armistice Day


                          C-SPAN551K subscribers
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                          Delivered from his Washington, DC home on November 10, 1923, the recording is the earliest known of a radio broadcast - and may have been the first remote (non-studio) radio broadcast. Learn More: https://www.c-span.org/video/?415923-...




                          Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                          Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                          George S Patton

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Wilson greatly expanded the US military. As Robert Enhold explains Prior to WW1 the US had 200,000 military members, after WW1 the US had 4 million military members. Wilson had a global vision of security at home, and the US leading the free world. It can safely be said Wilson played a role in providing the US military the tools to by the end of WW2..coming out as the strongest country and one of the most humane in world history. \

                            Wilson gave women the right to vote, ended child labor, argued against lynching... His social achievements are overlooked at times but never forgotten.
                            Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                            https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                            Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                            George S Patton

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Wilson like any man had his faults. When it came to female suffrage in the USA...it took some time but in the end Wilson appreciated womens contributions to WW1 and went on to support their right to vote.

                              President Woodrow Wilson speaks in favor of female suffrage



                              Wilson had actually maintained a somewhat lukewarm attitude toward women’s suffrage throughout his first term (1913-1917). In 1917, he had been picketed by suffragists outside the White House who berated him for paying mere lip service to their cause. The protests reached a crescendo when several women were arrested, jailed and went on a hunger strike. Wilson was appalled to learn that the jailed suffragists were being force-fed and he finally stepped in to champion their cause.

                              Suffragists and their supporters agreed that Wilson had a debt to pay to the country’s women, who at the time were asked to support their sons and husbands fighting overseas in the First World War and who were contributing to the war effort on the home front. In his September 30 speech to Congress, Wilson acknowledged this debt, saying “we have made partners of the women in this war…Shall we admit them only to a partnership of suffering and sacrifice and toil and not to a partnership of privilege and right?


                              https://www.history.com/this-day-in-...emale-suffrage
                              Long live the Lionheart! Please watch this video
                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=jRDwlR4zbEM
                              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3DBaY0RsxU
                              Accept the challenges so that you can feel the exhilaration of victory.

                              George S Patton

                              Comment

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