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The death of 'Green Tail'...

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post


    I believe that is actually Gunther Plüschow engaging a Japanese Maurice Farman over Tsingtao. He was also the only German POW to make a home run from the British mainland during either World War

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post

    Never heard of a famous aviator called Gutenberg Org...
    \\\\\\\\\\\the photo was Billy Miitchel in front of his SPAD fighter, before he became the Famous, the infamous, then vindicated Army air corps general.

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  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post

    Never heard of a famous aviator called Gutenberg Org...
    Baron Org von Gutenburg, Scourgemeister of the Rumpler Taube

    Last edited by marktwain; 04 Aug 19, 10:22. Reason: Rolland Taube is an according player

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    The Belgians had a fighter ace who flew a green tailed aircraft - Willy Coppens (Willy Omer François Jean baron Coppens de Houthulst (6 July 1892 – 21 December 1986) he flew a Hanriot and was sometimes referred to in the British press as the Green Baron

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  • Dibble201Bty
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post

    From the Gutenberg Project:
    KUDOS to anyone who recognizes this famous aviator..
    Never heard of a famous aviator called Gutenberg Org...

    Leave a comment:


  • Dibble201Bty
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post

    In a vacuum all bodies fall at the same rate and just to be sure one of the Apollo missions did the experiment on the moon
    In a vacuum yes! But are we discussing people, objects and the lack of a vacuum?

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  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post

    I could not agree with you more,- but the Eagle was in high demand post war, while a Liberty could be had a bargain price- to power your neighbourhood rum runner.

    PLUS you could fit three of them into the stern, so the mechanic could work on one, while the other two outran the Coast guard cutter.
    The use of aero engines to power smugglers' boats is not confined to the North American prohibition era. In the 80s and 90s there were dhows in the Gulf fitted with RR Merlin engines that ran gold and cigarettes etc into India and illegal migrants in the opposite direction

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
    Not half as difficult as those for X cylinder configurations as Rolls Royce were later to discover with the Vulture

    Aircraft had a better performance when fitted with the Rolls Royce Eagle rather than the Liberty but the latter was easier to produce in large numbers. The Liberty wasn't suited to every aircraft and a Liberty engined Bristol Fighter proved to be a disaster. Liberty engined Dh4b s served the USN into the 30s.
    I could not agree with you more,- but the Eagle was in high demand post war, while a Liberty could be had a bargain price- to power your neighbourhood rum runner.

    PLUS you could fit three of them into the stern, so the mechanic could work on one, while the other two outran the Coast guard cutter.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post


    V- cylinder crankshafts are actually hard to design and produce in quantity. The early reduction gear Hispano engines shook the reducing gears apart. the Liberty made a good - boat engine..
    Not half as difficult as those for X cylinder configurations as Rolls Royce were later to discover with the Vulture

    Aircraft had a better performance when fitted with the Rolls Royce Eagle rather than the Liberty but the latter was easier to produce in large numbers. The Liberty wasn't suited to every aircraft and a Liberty engined Bristol Fighter proved to be a disaster. Liberty engined Dh4b s served the USN into the 30s.

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post

    Unfortunately although the prototype Liberty was built in record time it contained many flaws that meant getting it to production status took longer and only a limited number were available before the Armistice. Large numbers reached completion just too late. One result was that the US had a huge post war surplus of Liberties and Congress issued regulations that inhibited the use of in line liquid cooled engines in US military aircraft until all the Liberties were used up. This skewed US engine development towards air cooled radials
    A good thing, in the end

    while France regarded the H-s engines as ' pour la gloire, toujours La Gloire', the viper's design concept as a two way trip engine for aircraft appealed to pilots...

    V- cylinder crankshafts are actually hard to design and produce in quantity. The early reduction gear Hispano engines shook the reducing gears apart. the Liberty made a good - boat engine..

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by marktwain View Post

    the Valkyrie is the …..no, maybe the second picture…, dunno, do plow horses weaR wear - horns??
    Why do I get all the tough questions....

    anyhow, back on topic- the SE-5 was a real game changer for the allies, especially after Wolseley refined the Hispano suiza engine into the Wolseley Viper...
    the Kaisereich had stuck with six cylinder in lines, rather than attempt to solve the complex balance and harmonics concerns of a V8, and could not match the 138 MPH Se-5.

    Wolseley is an unsung hero of the British War effort. their work enabled the American Liberty engine to be built in record time...

    The BMW IIIa was Germany's answer- too late in the war... and the viper:
    Unfortunately although the prototype Liberty was built in record time it contained many flaws that meant getting it to production status took longer and only a limited number were available before the Armistice. Large numbers reached completion just too late. One result was that the US had a huge post war surplus of Liberties and Congress issued regulations that inhibited the use of in line liquid cooled engines in US military aircraft until all the Liberties were used up. This skewed US engine development towards air cooled radials

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Canuckster View Post
    Is that pic based on description in "Flying Fury" by James McCudden's of Feb 18, 1918 action?

    A little bit of googling found the following...
    It was assumed that it was Otto Konnecke of Jasta 5 which all had green tails. Research though seems to show that even though Jasta 5 was previously in 56 Sgn's sector it had moved south during the timeframe in question. A German war diary entry for Jasta 35b reports a Justus Kaiser shot down and Stein wounded in the location and at the time which matches what McCudden reported.

    A quick google of Jasta 35b images shows all aircraft with white tails so go figure.
    From the Gutenberg Project:
    KUDOS to anyone who recognizes this famous aviator..

    Leave a comment:


  • Canuckster
    replied
    Is that pic based on description in "Flying Fury" by James McCudden's of Feb 18, 1918 action?

    A little bit of googling found the following...
    It was assumed that it was Otto Konnecke of Jasta 5 which all had green tails. Research though seems to show that even though Jasta 5 was previously in 56 Sgn's sector it had moved south during the timeframe in question. A German war diary entry for Jasta 35b reports a Justus Kaiser shot down and Stein wounded in the location and at the time which matches what McCudden reported.

    A quick google of Jasta 35b images shows all aircraft with white tails so go figure.

    Leave a comment:


  • marktwain
    replied
    Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
    Which is the Valkyrie and which is the plow horse?
    the Valkyrie is the …..no, maybe the second picture…, dunno, do plow horses weaR wear - horns??
    Why do I get all the tough questions....

    anyhow, back on topic- the SE-5 was a real game changer for the allies, especially after Wolseley refined the Hispano suiza engine into the Wolseley Viper...
    the Kaisereich had stuck with six cylinder in lines, rather than attempt to solve the complex balance and harmonics concerns of a V8, and could not match the 138 MPH Se-5.

    Wolseley is an unsung hero of the British War effort. their work enabled the American Liberty engine to be built in record time...

    The BMW IIIa was Germany's answer- too late in the war... and the viper:

    Last edited by marktwain; 29 Jul 19, 07:55.

    Leave a comment:


  • MarkV
    replied
    Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post

    They do not! Air resistance can cause an object to fall slower.
    In a vacuum all bodies fall at the same rate and just to be sure one of the Apollo missions did the experiment on the moon

    Leave a comment:

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