Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Pals Battalions at the Somme

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Pals Battalions at the Somme

    This is basically a question for you Brits out there, since you are likely to have a stronger personal connection to this than any Yank.

    I have read a great deal about the habit of recruiting battalions from the same towns and even workplaces during the Great War, with the expectation of solidarity. But we all know (I'm willing to bet) that at the Somme, and certainly elsewhere, that this policy resulted in almost the entire adult male population of a town being annihilated in a single day. Good idea in theory, but in practice, it was just one more bungle at the top that added to the pain and misery of that damned war.

    So my rather general question is this...

    In the UK, what is the modern take on this concept? Is it still discussed and debated there? Were any of you descended from someone who served in one?

    Fire away.
    "Yellowstain!"

  • #2
    Originally posted by RapierFighter View Post
    This is basically a question for you Brits out there, since you are likely to have a stronger personal connection to this than any Yank.

    I have read a great deal about the habit of recruiting battalions from the same towns and even workplaces during the Great War, with the expectation of solidarity. But we all know (I'm willing to bet) that at the Somme, and certainly elsewhere, that this policy resulted in almost the entire adult male population of a town being annihilated in a single day. Good idea in theory, but in practice, it was just one more bungle at the top that added to the pain and misery of that damned war.

    So my rather general question is this...

    In the UK, what is the modern take on this concept? Is it still discussed and debated there? Were any of you descended from someone who served in one?

    Fire away.
    To answer your ummm recruiting question they did the same in Australia to form Battalions with larger towns like ALbury/ Wodonga, Bendigo, Ballarat, Melbourne and etc in other states there would of been one Battalion formed per Large regional city/ town Eg in WW1 Albury had a Battery that served in France and if you to a park in Albury you will find it's called after a French town where they served with distinction where I think they had to fight against Germans to regain there guns the park is called Nauriol excuse the spelling
    http://g.bf3stats.com/pc/1LP76r6C/melba_101.png

    Comment


    • #3
      The recuitment of Pals battalions during 1914 and 1915, was based upon the belief that to recuit men with a strong local connection to each other would help boast recuitment and promote a strong sense of comradship within the unit. Indeed in large cites the recuitment of such pals battalions, was often based upon jobs (such as the Civil Services Rifles or Pst Office Rifles), in other cases on the bases of former membership of the Boys Brigade (a regilious youth movemnet) or as in Edinburgh upon the supporters of Hearts Football Club.

      Of course the level of slaughter on the Western Front was not envisaged at the time and the result of heavy losses suffered by towns such as Accrington, due to the losses at the first day of the battle of the Somme, caused a serve loss of civilain morale. The effect of the Battle of Somme effectively ended the policy of highly local recuitment, when in from 1916 consciption was introduced, within the battalions formed there would be greater mix from the whole of a county to which a regiment was based. Also drafts of newly trained infantry and wounded men returning to combat could often find themselves drafted into regiments from other parts of the Britain as a result of the need to replace losses.

      In the Second World War there was even less attempt to keep local men within local regiments, for example there were plenty of London based regiments full of Scotsman and plenty of Scottish Regiments full of Cockneys.
      War is less costly than servitude

      Comment


      • #4
        If you go onto the moors above Sheffield you can still see the trench systems dug by the Sheffield Pals during their training.
        http://www.sheffieldforum.co.uk/showthread.php?t=5166
        The long toll of the brave
        Is not lost in darkness
        Over the fruitful earth
        And athwart the seas
        Hath passed the light of noble deeds
        Unquenchable forever.

        Comment


        • #5
          Of the 140'000 Irish men that enlisted during the first World War (half from Northern Ireland, half from the south) about 35'000 were killed. Many of these were pals brigades. There is a poignant photo of a pals brigade in Landsdown Road rugby grounds before they departed for the front. As with so many such photo's many did not return.
          I think the consensus is that they were a bad idea.
          "The thing about quotes on the internet is that you cannot confirm their
          validity." - Abraham Lincoln.
          "Nothing's going to change while one side it lying about the cause and the other is lying about the solution" - Me

          Comment


          • #6
            The main problem I have with calling the Pals Battalions a failure was they closely mirrored what the Germans were doing. They just went a little TOO local. The problem with these battalions was the complete lack of experienced Officers and NCOs to staff them. Even after months of "training" they were only capable of the rudest tactics. The British Army could not even clothe them, let alone arm them properly. Both of these took months.

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by kendrick View Post
              The recuitment of Pals battalions during 1914 and 1915, was based upon the belief that to recuit men with a strong local connection to each other would help boast recuitment and promote a strong sense of comradship within the unit. Indeed in large cites the recuitment of such pals battalions, was often based upon jobs (such as the Civil Services Rifles or Pst Office Rifles), in other cases on the bases of former membership of the Boys Brigade (a regilious youth movemnet) or as in Edinburgh upon the supporters of Hearts Football Club.

              Of course the level of slaughter on the Western Front was not envisaged at the time and the result of heavy losses suffered by towns such as Accrington, due to the losses at the first day of the battle of the Somme, caused a serve loss of civilain morale. The effect of the Battle of Somme effectively ended the policy of highly local recuitment, when in from 1916 consciption was introduced, within the battalions formed there would be greater mix from the whole of a county to which a regiment was based. Also drafts of newly trained infantry and wounded men returning to combat could often find themselves drafted into regiments from other parts of the Britain as a result of the need to replace losses.

              In the Second World War there was even less attempt to keep local men within local regiments, for example there were plenty of London based regiments full of Scotsman and plenty of Scottish Regiments full of Cockneys.
              I agree mate and in hindsight it was a bad mistake that shock whole communitys some of which never recovered ..
              owner of the yahoo group for WW1 ,WW2 and Modern TO&Es
              (Tables of organisation & equipment or Unit of action )

              http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOandEs/

              Comment

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              Working...
              X