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  • Living History Thread

    I was reading the article about the WWI veteran in West Virginia being one of three left in the US and got to thinking:I have never met any veterans from The Great War and wondered how many ACG members had. The further extension was if anyone had any stories to share regarding their conversations with the veterans.

    So, I am hoping some of you will step forward with any kinds of personal stories you have!

    Thanks and have a wonderful day!

  • #2
    I remember back in grade school we had a vet come in to talk to us around Remembrance Day, but that was a long time ago.

    My Uncle took me to meet Raymond Collishaw once, I don't remember too much about it as I was probably 7 at the time. I just remember looking through an old photo album and asking about the planes I saw in the pictures. That's probably where my interest in the Great War started. Man, if I had my time back....
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
      I was reading the article about the WWI veteran in West Virginia being one of three left in the US and got to thinking:I have never met any veterans from The Great War and wondered how many ACG members had. The further extension was if anyone had any stories to share regarding their conversations with the veterans.

      So, I am hoping some of you will step forward with any kinds of personal stories you have!

      Thanks and have a wonderful day!
      Actually, you have four WW1 vets living in USA. One of them served in Canadian army and now lives in Washington state I believe. His birthday was fairly recent. Which means Canada has zero living here. Which means ww1 is no longer part of living history up here. More reason than ever to talk with a WW2 vet when you get the chance and say thanks

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      • #4
        My grandfathers and most of their friends were WW1 vets.

        Same-same father and uncles ref WW2.

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        • #5
          Unfortunately, I have never seen or met a WW1 vet. However, I have some pictures and stories of my ancestors who fought in the war.
          There cannot be a crisis next week. My schedule is already full. -Henry Kissinger

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
            I was reading the article about the WWI veteran in West Virginia being one of three left in the US and got to thinking:I have never met any veterans from The Great War and wondered how many ACG members had. The further extension was if anyone had any stories to share regarding their conversations with the veterans.

            So, I am hoping some of you will step forward with any kinds of personal stories you have!

            Thanks and have a wonderful day!
            Like you, I never got to meet a vet and probably never will - all the Australian vets have passed on.
            Colonel Summers' widely quoted critique of US strategy in the Vietnam War is having a modest vogue...it is poor history, poor strategy, and poor Clausewitz to boot - Robet Komer, Survival, 27:2, p. 94.

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            • #7
              When I was in I think the 6th grade, we went on a field trip to a holocaust museum where we met some survivors who was kind enough to spend a couple of hours telling them of their experiences. One old Jewish gentleman turned out to be a WW1 German veteran with an Iron Cross. Apart from what the Nazis did to him, he was still proud of the fact that he had served his native Germany, although he said he would never return there. As far as I know, he was only WW1 vet that I've met, however I'm sure that most of us that are old enough must have met some and not realised it, because most men of that era do not brag about their contributions....................all the more reason to treat seniors with respect, especially now because the WW2 and Korean War vets are disappearing very fast now.
              Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

              Prayers.

              BoRG

              http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

              https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the contributions! I didn't get the stories I was looking for, but at least I have plenty of good company now!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                  I was reading the article about the WWI veteran in West Virginia being one of three left in the US and got to thinking:I have never met any veterans from The Great War and wondered how many ACG members had. The further extension was if anyone had any stories to share regarding their conversations with the veterans.

                  So, I am hoping some of you will step forward with any kinds of personal stories you have!

                  Thanks and have a wonderful day!

                  My old Dad.

                  Thomas Henry Steadman Born 1899

                  Volunteered Royal Navy spring 1914

                  H.M.S Exe Destroyer (1914-15) Boy Telegraphist, Channel Convoy escort.

                  H.M.S Newcastle Cruiser (1916-19) Able Seaman/Torpedoman/Telegraphist,
                  China Station (1916), Pacific and South Atlantic (1916), Mediteranian and Indian (1917), South Atlantic (1918)

                  H.M.S Royal Sovreign and various shore establishments (1919-27)

                  Actions and combats...

                  Adriatic 1917 - Newcastle versus Austrian Destroyer flotilla - shell splinter headwound (minor)

                  Eastern Med 1917 - Naval landing and inland raid, Southern Turkish mainland - machinegun wounds (3 in leg)


                  hope its of interest, just sketched the raw basics for you.

                  Gaz

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Biscuit View Post
                    I was reading the article about the WWI veteran in West Virginia being one of three left in the US and got to thinking:I have never met any veterans from The Great War and wondered how many ACG members had. The further extension was if anyone had any stories to share regarding their conversations with the veterans.

                    So, I am hoping some of you will step forward with any kinds of personal stories you have!

                    Thanks and have a wonderful day!
                    My mothers uncle was a Serjeant in the South Irish Horse and served in France. He survived the war and died aged 65 when I was 10 years old.
                    When he returned from the war he lived with his brother and two sisters on their farm in Ireland. None of them married. I remember him being quiet. He fished and kept ferrets. I never heard him speak of the war.
                    I have his cavelry sabre.
                    There is a picture of one here:
                    http://www.militaryheritage.com/images/1908_1.jpg

                    The following is a quote from here:
                    http://www.militaryhorse.org/forum/t...&TOPIC_ID=5326

                    "The sabre was positioned on the opposite side to the rifle bucket, on which the metal mess tin was strapped. Interestingly, it is widely judged by armoury scholars that the 1908 pattern cavalrysabre was, perhaps, the best designed and weighted edged weapon the British Army had ever produced. Ironically, the sword was also one of the most under used. One 'Fragment from France' cartoon by Captain Bruce Bairnsfather illustrated the dilemma perfectly; in one picture, a smartly dressed officer dashes heroically forth with his sabre aloft - the caption underneath reading 'That Sword. How he thought he was going to use it'. The following picture showed the same officer, begrimed and now thoroughly miserable, sitting by a little brazier toasting a bit of bread on the sword-point, with the caption: ' - and how he did use it.' "

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                    • #11
                      My grandfather was a Don Cossack in WW1, but he died in Korea as a US Marine, so I never knew him. One of my mother's uncles was drafted into the US Army, was sent to France, and he ended up assigned to a support unit. He recalled his military service as being comprised of baseball (apparently his unit was an army baseball team) boredom, and dysentery. His advice to me was to never volunteer for anything, advice which I promptly ignored at my 18th birthday, six years after my uncle's death.
                      I was married for two ******* years! Hell would be like Club Med! - Sam Kinison

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for the stories guys! Any little bit is appreciated!

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                        • #13
                          My Uncle, Jay Walker went to France with the Wyoming NG. Many people do not realize that much of the original AEF were an almagimation of the States Guards. They staged out of "FT Patterson"? on Long Island NY. Artillary unit, he was gassed early in 1918, but survived. My memories of him were as a hard drinking cattle rancher in Montana circa 1950's-60's. Amazing man in many ways, though totally active through most of his life, I remember the coughing fits that my Dad said were "because of the war".
                          They were men back then.
                          My Avatar: Ivan W. Henderson Gunner/navigator B-25-26. 117 combat missions. Both Theaters. 11 confirmed kills. DSC.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by holly6 View Post
                            My Uncle, Jay Walker went to France with the Wyoming NG. Many people do not realize that much of the original AEF were an almagimation of the States Guards. They staged out of "FT Patterson"? on Long Island NY. Artillary unit, he was gassed early in 1918, but survived. My memories of him were as a hard drinking cattle rancher in Montana circa 1950's-60's. Amazing man in many ways, though totally active through most of his life, I remember the coughing fits that my Dad said were "because of the war".
                            They were men back then.
                            Agreed Holly6. They were indeed men back then and we're not likely to see their like ever again.
                            "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

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                            • #15
                              My paternal Grand Father was Navy during the Great War, as was my Father during the Second World War. I will see if I can yet gather up some of what I have & can yet recall & post it as soon as I am able. I vaguely remember some of his old sea stories, most of them of a horrified young sailor... but they were told to me 35-45 years ago.

                              A worthy effort, Biscuit...

                              Worthy indeed!

                              On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

                              ACG History Today

                              BoRG

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