Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

100 th Anniversary of Battle of the Somme

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 100 th Anniversary of Battle of the Somme

    Today 1st of July 2016 is the 100th Anniversary of the deadliest WWI battle.
    à vaincre sans péril, on triomphe sans gloire (triumph without peril brings no glory) P. Corneille

    Le probleme avec les cons, c'est qu'il ne se fatiguent jamais
    (The problem with Pr.cks, is that they never get tired ) Michel Audiard

  • #2
    Hey the froggie !
    Who cares ???
    Let us alone , we have got our real problems :slow internet , color of the pants of Her Majesty, winner of the Eurofoot , new ass of Kardashian .

    Tous ces pauvres couillons sont morts pour RIEN
    That rug really tied the room together

    Comment


    • #3
      the battle of the Somme which lasted half time
      less than the battle of Verdun caused two an half times more casualties than Verdun. 5 dead, wounded, LIA, every minute.Terrible Statistics.
      Last edited by PGT Beauregard; 02 Jul 16, 02:41.
      à vaincre sans péril, on triomphe sans gloire (triumph without peril brings no glory) P. Corneille

      Le probleme avec les cons, c'est qu'il ne se fatiguent jamais
      (The problem with Pr.cks, is that they never get tired ) Michel Audiard

      Comment


      • #4
        Ah!! FM Haig and staffs crowning achievement......Nothing like ordering your men TO WALK into mass machine gun fire......."God is on our side"....and dont forget the Newfoundland'ers who WALKED into mass fire and died to almost the last man....

        Note....More bodies in one day than 10 years in Veitnam....

        Comment


        • #5
          Contrary to popular conceptions there was a logical reason. No mansland was in places up to half a mile wide and generally the ground was very rough and full of shell holes, old broken walls and fences partly concealed by long grass. At the same time the men were burdened with a rifle and bayonet, full water bottle, an entrenching tool and 150 rounds of ammunition all weighing 49lbs 2oz (HB(A)/CM/6/3). In addition to his personal equipment each soldier carried iron rations plus additional equipment which could be any thing from wire cutters, spare magazines for the Lewis gun sections, spare Mills Bombs for the bombers, screw pickets and wire for consolidating positions once taken and so on. Those guys were laden. Tactical theory at the time -based on experience gained in 1915 (Neuve Chappel, Loos etc) suggested that for an attack to be a success the attackers should all arrive at the enemy line together , in good order and not in dribs and drabs, with some winded from running and stumbling heavily laden over rough ground. Training exercises suggested that the best way to achieve this was to advance in open order at a steady walking pace with officers keeping the men properly aligned. Don't forget that it was, incorrectly, assumed that the barrage would have eliminated the enemy's machine gun positions. In fact in some places this actually worked. In the more southern sectors where there had been cooperation with more experienced French artillery the advancing lines of infantry reached the German front line before the enemy could bring up his machine guns from deep bunkers and the positions were taken. Tragically this did not work in the more northerly part of the battle field.

          It may have been a mistaken tactic but it wasn't blindly stupid.
          Last edited by MarkV; 01 Jul 16, 10:17.
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

          Comment


          • #6
            To add to the above - the Official History states that the load carried by an infantryman on the first day was 66lbs but survivors have suggested that could have been as high as 80lbs. Contemporary Army Instructions stated that a man in full battle kit could not be expected move faster than 50 yards at the slow double and 20 yards at the full charge if he was to arrive at the objective "fit for fighting". Given the width of no mans land it was on this basis inevitable that some of it would have to be crossed at walking pace.
            Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
            Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

            Comment


            • #7
              For those interested, there is a new Somme issue of the British Journal for Military History. This is a free journal of peer-reviewed articles. There looks to be some good stuff:

              Volume 2, Issue 3 - EDITORIAL

              Time to don your tin hats! Here comes the First World War centenary… again!

              1 July 2016 will mark 100 years since the opening of the Battle of the Somme. Amidst the many questions that will be asked of the conduct, bloodshed, and legacy lies a golden opportunity for historians to explore themes that rarely get an airing. Pals, mud and machine guns dominate public perceptions while newspapers, documentaries and books recycle the same emotive tropes. Yet these Anglo-centric narratives, as important as they are, can overshadow the international contributions that were made to one of the most important battles of the twentieth century.

              The BJMH is proud to bring you three articles on the battle of the Somme from three international scholars. The French commitment to the battle, so often overlooked, is vividly brought to life by Elizabeth Greenhalgh who has skilfully charted the important role played by Ferdinand Foch. Meleah Hampton has produced a magisterial account of the Australians on the Somme, which offers some serious and trenchant criticism of our cover star Hubert de la Poer Gough. And in a fine work of micro-history, Bill Stewart has artfully unpicked the attack of the 44th Battalion of the 4th Canadian Division on 25 October 1916 shedding light on the Canadian participation in the latter stages of the battle. The historical duckboards of the Somme may be well-trodden, but these articles offer a challenge to simple parochial, national views of that seminal battle and provide genuinely original insights which we are proud to showcase here.

              If the centenary of the First World War is beginning to feel a little too similar to the attritional slog of the war itself, then let Philip Abbott, Paul Donker, and Kenton White provide a little nineteenth century respite. Looking at the diverse effects of the Napoleonic War on art, military thought and mapping they showcase the enduring resonance of that conflict just over two hundred years on.

              While the centenary of the First World War will probably rumble on in predictable ways, the BJMH will continue to publish fresh and original research produced by historians from across the globe. We hope you enjoy this issue.

              DR STUART MITCHELL, EDITOR BJMH
              Follow this link to the articles: http://bjmh.org.uk/index.php/bjmh/issue/view/6

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
                Hey the froggie !
                Who cares ???
                Let us alone , we have got our real problems :slow internet , color of the pants of Her Majesty, winner of the Eurofoot , new ass of Kardashian .

                Tous ces pauvres couillons sont morts pour RIEN
                that's right mon pote, they don't seem to have any interest on this mass murder
                à vaincre sans péril, on triomphe sans gloire (triumph without peril brings no glory) P. Corneille

                Le probleme avec les cons, c'est qu'il ne se fatiguent jamais
                (The problem with Pr.cks, is that they never get tired ) Michel Audiard

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
                  Hey the froggie !
                  Who cares ???
                  Let us alone , we have got our real problems :slow internet , color of the pants of Her Majesty, winner of the Eurofoot , new ass of Kardashian .

                  Tous ces pauvres couillons sont morts pour RIEN
                  Why do you think that they ''died for nothing''?

                  And why do you call them ''arseholes''?



                  Paul
                  ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                  All human ills he can subdue,
                  Or with a bauble or medal
                  Can win mans heart for you;
                  And many a blessing know to stew
                  To make a megloamaniac bright;
                  Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                  The Pixie is a little shite.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                    To add to the above - the Official History states that the load carried by an infantryman on the first day was 66lbs but survivors have suggested that could have been as high as 80lbs. Contemporary Army Instructions stated that a man in full battle kit could not be expected move faster than 50 yards at the slow double and 20 yards at the full charge if he was to arrive at the objective "fit for fighting". Given the width of no mans land it was on this basis inevitable that some of it would have to be crossed at walking pace.
                    That, and I seem to recall the ground was extremely muddy both due to the nature of the terrain itself as well as a consequence of having been churned up by artillery fire. The result: a morass into which the hapless men of the British Army sank to their shins and were mowed down by the thousands.
                    Divine Mercy Sunday: 4/21/2020 (https://www.thedivinemercy.org/message) The Miracle of Lanciano: Jesus' Real Presence (https://web.archive.org/web/20060831...fcontents.html)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Eric Bogle said it best, here ably assisted by the Corries;

                      Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Dibble201Bty View Post
                        Why do you think that they ''died for nothing''?

                        And why do you call them ''arseholes''?



                        Paul
                        I have the ultimate respect for them.
                        My grangreat father died in April 1918 in Belgium after 3 years of trenches.
                        And "couillons" is more like "poor bastards"
                        But let's face the facts :excepted a bunch of guys here who keep the memory and the message alive , all these braves are dead and we're dancing on them.
                        That rug really tied the room together

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by sebfrench76 View Post
                          I have the ultimate respect for them.
                          My grangreat father died in April 1918 in Belgium after 3 years of trenches.
                          And "couillons" is more like "poor bastards"
                          But let's face the facts :excepted a bunch of guys here who keep the memory and the message alive , all these braves are dead and we're dancing on them.
                          I thought it rather out of character what you meant in your post and should have realised that you meant well and I'm sorry if I got the wrong end of the stick. It's all down to me losing it in the translation.

                          Silly me for reacting the way I did.

                          As for the First World War as a whole, I see that conflict as one sad episode which I barely read about. I have only read books like 'Mud Blood and Poppycock, 'The War the Infantry Knew, 'The Somme Then and Now, a few magazine articles and the 1960's BBC Great War documentary, I couldn't stomach studying any more....Oh! My great uncle is commemorated at Theipval.

                          Paul
                          ‘Tis said his form is tiny, yet
                          All human ills he can subdue,
                          Or with a bauble or medal
                          Can win mans heart for you;
                          And many a blessing know to stew
                          To make a megloamaniac bright;
                          Give honour to the dainty Corse,
                          The Pixie is a little shite.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Hey Paul!
                            That's the internet.!
                            You don't see my face when I'm keyboarding and English's not my native language.
                            So you're not the one to blame,rather me !
                            That rug really tied the room together

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by BobTheBarbarian View Post
                              That, and I seem to recall the ground was extremely muddy both due to the nature of the terrain itself as well as a consequence of having been churned up by artillery fire. The result: a morass into which the hapless men of the British Army sank to their shins and were mowed down by the thousands.
                              I think it was generally believed that the artillery barrage would be so devastating that ,rather than using the very basis of infantry minor tactics, that of Fire-and- Movement, it was thought that the advancing troops could advance in extended line without too many problems.
                              "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                              Samuel Johnson.

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X