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World Revolution and the Comintern

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  • World Revolution and the Comintern

    (I felt this thread belonged on the WW1 forum because Communism in Russia was implanted by the Wilhelmine Government as a means of defeating Russia. This was the most fateful consequence of WW1)

    “When we took power in October we were nothing more in Europe than a single spark. True, sparks began to fly, and they flew from us. This is our greatest achievement, but even so, these were isolated sparks. Now most countries within the sphere of Austro-German imperialism are aflame (Bulgaria, Austria and Hungary). We know that from Bulgaria the revolution has spread to Serbia. We know how these worker-peasant revolutions passed through Austria and reached Germany. Several countries are enveloped in the flames of workers’ revolution. In this respect our efforts and sacrifices have been justified . . . . We have never been so near to world proletarian revolution as we are now.”

    Vladimir Ilich Lenin
    Addressing the Sixth All-Russian Congress of Soviets, November 8, 1918


    “Britain, France, America and Spain have been infected with the same disease and are fired with the same flame as Germany, the flame of the universal and world-wide struggle of the working class against imperialism.”

    Vladimir Ilich Lenin
    Addressing the Third Workers’ Cooperative Congress, December 9, 1918


    “We decided to have an army of one million men by the spring; now we need an army of three million. We can have it. And we shall have it!”

    Vladimir Ilich Lenin
    From a letter to the All-Russian Central Executive Committee, October 3, 1918




    January of 1919 found Lenin an island of smiling, winking serenity in a sea of chaos.
    The armies of Kolchak, Deniken and Yudenich were locked in mortal combat with the Red Army, their ultimate defeat was then far from certain. Poverty, disease, famine, crime and brutality were rife but Lenin remained calm, at least outwardly. The world revolution, he was certain, would soon break out and rescue him from all of his troubles.
    Trotsky was in total agreement: “We are putting all our hope on this, that our revolution will solve the European revolution. Either the Russian revolution will raise the whirlwind of struggle in the West, or the capitalism of all countries will stifle our struggle.”

    War, according to Communist doctrine, was the ideal circumstance for political subversion and a number of energetic measures in that direction had already been undertaken.
    As early as December 1917, a decree of the Council of People’s Commissars announced that the Council

    “deems it necessary to come to the assistance of the Left International wing of the labor movement of all countries, by all possible means, including funds, whether the said countries are at war with Russia or allied to Russia, or occupying a neutral position. For this purpose the Council of People’s Commissars resolves: that the sum of two million rubles shall be placed at the disposal of the foreign representatives of the Commissariat of Foreign Affairs for the needs of the Revolutionary Internationalist Movement.”

    At Lenin’s direction, propaganda and daily newspapers in different languages were produced in great quantities and, as John Reed observed,

    “Every week the ‘diplomatic couriers’ of the People’s Commissariat leave Smolny (Bolshevik headquarters) for the capitals of Europe, with trunk-loads of this material, bent on stirring up revolution . . . by September 1918, the [Soviet] Ministry of Foreign Affairs had on its payroll 68 agents in Austria-Hungary, and more than that in Germany, as well as others in France, Switzerland, and Italy.”

    Subversion was not limited to Europe by any means as this report from Deputy Foreign Commissar Lev Karakhan to Lenin makes clear:

    “The proposal is to allocate 200,000 [roubles] for the first quarter of the year, January to March 1919, to the Foreign Commissariat for supporting Asian labour organizations and sending agitators to make propaganda in Asia. The cost of each agitator, plus his bonus when he returns, would be as follows: Korea – 10,000 roubles; South China – 20,000 roubles. Similar missions are envisaged for Persia and India.”

    Money of course was no longer a problem and Lenin insisted that it be spent lavishly to foster social upheaval. To Angelica Balabanova, Lenin wrote urgently: “The work you are doing is of the utmost importance and I implore you to go on with it. Do not consider the cost! Spend millions, tens of millions if necessary. There is plenty of money at our disposal”, Lenin implored Ian Berzin, the Soviet ambassador in Switzerland: “There is enough money where you are . . . I shall give even more without asking for a receipt. Let me know how much. We should publish a hundred times more, in four languages. Able comrades shall visit you. Don’t spare money, especially that destined for propaganda in France!”

    When these early efforts began to bear fruit in Finland, Bavaria and Hungary, Lenin exulted: “Old Europe is rushing toward revolution at breakneck speed.” As early as January 20, 1918, Izvestiia editorialized: “The mole of revolution is working everywhere . . . the victory of the world revolution is just around the corner!”

    And indeed, there was good reason to celebrate. Communist inspired strikes in Berlin had undermined Ludendorff’s spring offensives and forced Germany to sue for peace. Soviet republics had been declared in Finland, Bavaria and Hungary. Austria, Switzerland and the newly-independent Baltic nations seemed likely to follow. But by the middle of 1919, there were early indications that Bolshevik euphoria was premature.

    Trotsky’s delaying tactics during the Brest-Litovsk peace negotiations had resulted in a relentless German advance and harsh peace terms which seriously split the Bolshevik leadership. The following months saw the collapse of a number of proletarian dictatorships and Communist partisans in Germany were proving no match for the anti-Communist Freikorps formations.

    Such setbacks made Lenin realize that world revolution, after all, required a world class instrument, not just money and propaganda. He had been thinking about just such an instrument for some months, and now the murders of the German Spartaskusbund leaders, Liebknecht and Luxembourg, spurred him to action.

    A crucial meeting held on January 21, 1919, and presided over by Lenin was recalled by one of the attendees, Boris Reinstein:

    “They drew up an appeal to the revolutionary proletarian organizations of all countries, inviting them to dispatch representatives secretly to Moscow for March 1, 1919, to discuss the founding of the Communist International.”

    A few days later the invitations were sent out by Foreign Minister Chicherin and on March 2nd, the conference—to be referred to as the Third International—opened within the imposing walls of the Kremlin. By the time closing ceremonies were held in the Bolshoi Theater on March 6th, a brand new organization had been born. A top-secret organization dedicated to the methodical and scientific subversion of the nations of the world and fully backed by the wealth and resources of the Soviet Union. Lenin properly described it as “a great historical event of universal significance.”

    The creation of the Communist International, or ‘Comintern,’ was considered necessary to defend Bolshevism against foreign opposition, but it was far more than this: it was the embodiment of Lenin’s grand strategic plan for a brave new world. A world in which each nation would be ruled by a tiny clique of revolutionary Left socialists. Not Social Democrats or “reformist” Socialists, but true believers in the Dictatorship of the Proletariat—defined by Lenin as “based directly on force, and unrestricted by any laws” and subservient to Moscow – that is, Lenin and his successors. It was the beginning of the Cold War.

    Within a year, Lenin’s nightmare vision was becoming a reality through thousands of secret Comintern agents carrying suitcases stuffed with hard cash confiscated from the starving Russian bourgeoisie and looted from the churches. The following excerpt from the Comintern Budget Commission meeting of March 1922 will give the reader an idea of how the money was allocated:

    1 Budget for the German CP: Brandler, Popov, Humbert-Droz and Pyatnitsky voted for a grant for 1922 of 446,592 gold roubles. Solts and Molotov voted for 400,000 gold roubles.

    2 Budget for the French CP: unanimous vote for a grant of 100,000 gold roubles.

    3 Budget for the Italian CP: 360,000 gold roubles or 4,306,000 lire.

    4 Budget for the English CP: unanimous vote for 200,000 gold roubles.


    The list goes on to allocate money for the Communist parties of the USA, Japan, Korea, Turkey, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, China, India, Persia, Italy, Finland, Holland, Spain, Argentina, Hungary, South Africa, Yugoslavia, Greece, Romania, Poland, Sweden, Austria, Switzerland, Norway, Luxembourg, etc. Total expenditure for 1922 alone is 5,536,400 gold roubles!

    In February 1921, the Comintern launched its first official operation to foment revolution in Germany. The attempt was an ignominious and bloody failure. Even as German troops and police were rounding up conspirators by the hundreds, Comintern Chief Gregory Zinoviev was speechifying in Moscow: “Arm yourselves, German proletarians! Wherever you can get hold of a gun, take it! Form Soviets! Build a Red Army! Long live the proletarian revolution in Germany and the whole world!” But as this and subsequent attempts ended in failure, the Comintern was forced to abandon its policy of touching-off sudden, violent upheavals. Over time, the organization became more focused and reverted to a policy of steady burrowing and targeting youth organizations, trade unions, student fraternities, discussion groups and the like.

    To ensure that the mushrooming global network of Communist Parties remain subservient to Moscow, Lenin promulgated 21 “Conditions for the Admission of Parties to the Communist International.” These were binding and summarized as follows:

    • All decrees and resolutions of the ECCI (Executive Committee of the Communist International) are binding on all the Parties

    • The Communist Press must be edited by reliable Communists and consistently push the idea of Dictatorship of the Proletariat.

    • All the Parties are to establish legal and illegal programs and “illegal apparatus” to advance the revolution.

    • Each Party must establish illegal cells within the armies.

    • All Parties are required to use the name “Communist” in their official designations.

    • New programs must be drawn up “in the spirit of the decisions of the Communist International” and be submitted to the ECCI for ratification.

    • All Parties must conduct periodic purges to cleanse and remove “the petty bourgeois elements that inevitably creep into it.”


    In each country, the radical Left was thus required to comply with Lenin’s 21 Conditions in order to be affiliated with, and receive money from, the Comintern. As there was little or no grass-roots support for Communism in those early days, the fledgling parties had a simple choice: affiliate with the Comintern or wither on the vine. As Lenin intended, this Hobson’s choice split the world Socialist movement and pitted the International Communist Left against the “reformist” Social Democratic Left.
    The split widened into opposing camps as Social Democrats appealed to the workers’ sense of patriotism and began to mold their normal feelings of patriotism and nationalism into an ideological alternative to the violent Internationalist dogma preached by the Comintern – in short, National vs. International Socialism.

    Inevitably, the nations where national Socialist/anti-Communist reaction eventually triumphed, tended to draw together and ultimately resulted in the Anti-Comintern Pact (1936), the Pact of Steel (1939), and the Tripartite Pact (1940).
    "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

  • #2
    What is the point? What are you arguing?

    Comment


    • #3
      Agree. What is the point?

      And I have to ask, did you write the OP or have you copied it from another source. If copied, it needs to be shortened and a link provided.
      Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by R. Evans View Post

        And I have to ask, did you write the OP or have you copied it from another source. If copied, it needs to be shortened and a link provided.
        http://www.thehistoryforum.com/forum...p?f=70&t=30134

        Looks like he has a blog on that website.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by R. Evans View Post
          Agree. What is the point?

          And I have to ask, did you write the OP or have you copied it from another source. If copied, it needs to be shortened and a link provided.
          I wrote it. It comes from my own book: Our Century, which may be seen at my website: www.ourcenturybook.com

          I also posted it on the Axis History Forum.

          My point is that subversion fomented by the Comintern brought National Socialists to power - Mussolini, Hitler, Franco, Tojo, which led directly to WW2.

          I am not certain that the post belongs on the WW1 forum, but please be assured that the writing is my own and comes from twenty-some years of research.
          "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by peterhof View Post

            My point is that subversion fomented by the Comintern brought National Socialists to power - Mussolini, Hitler, Franco, Tojo, which led directly to WW2.
            And Koba took over after Lenin died and seemed to be the one with the most power at the end of WWII, and was much stronger after WWII than when it began.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sgt. Rock View Post
              And Koba took over after Lenin died and seemed to be the one with the most power at the end of WWII, and was much stronger after WWII than when it began.
              "Koba" was a fond nickname for Stalin which was itself a made-up name meaning "man of steel." Stalin [real name: Joseph Vissarion Djugashvili] did indeed take over having defeated Trotsky after Lenin died in January of 1924.
              "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                "Koba" was a fond nickname for Stalin which was itself a made-up name meaning "man of steel." Stalin [real name: Joseph Vissarion Djugashvili] did indeed take over having defeated Trotsky after Lenin died in January of 1924.
                Looks like he also went by Vasily.

                http://books.google.com/books?id=nA7...Stalin&f=false

                http://books.google.com/books?id=kou...Vasily&f=false

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                • #9
                  I had no idea, but we may be getting a bit far afield from WW1.
                  "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    You have yet to prove the theory that Lenin was funded by the German government. I made a post in your thread about the "sealed" train explaining why Lenin's passage across the German territory could not be possibly considered a "secret mission paid by the German government". You ignored it, obviously cause you couldn't refute it. All of your implications of Lenin's "conspiracy" with the German HQ were based on "look, Parvus TALKED to Lenin and oh that surely means there was a grand deal, I tell ya!" Now you are peddling your BS again despite being pointed to glaring flaws in your "reasoning".
                    www.histours.ru

                    Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ShAA View Post
                      I made a post in your thread about the "sealed" train explaining why Lenin's passage across the German territory could not be possibly considered a "secret mission paid by the German government". You ignored it, obviously cause you couldn't refute it.
                      I missed your post. But I have gone back to it and replied.
                      "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                        I missed your post. But I have gone back to it and replied.
                        And what a brilliant reply it was

                        The bottom line is that Lenin's voyage across Germany was little different from the voyage of other political exiles who came a month later exactly the same way. One has to absolutely lack any scholarly integrity to maintain that the fact of his passage across the German territory constituted any sort of "betrayal" or "cooperation" with the Germans. Like I've said before, the Russian authorities officially allowed him and the other exiles to return and started negotiations with the Germans to allow them the right of passage. What the propagandists are trying to accuse him of is that he made the deal that the Russian government was supposed to make all by himself. This explanation might work for ignorant fools but not for those who have read books on the subject. I mean historical books, not your worthless German fanboy fantasy scribblings
                        www.histours.ru

                        Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by peterhof View Post

                          My point is that subversion fomented by the Comintern brought National Socialists to power - Mussolini, Hitler, Franco, Tojo, which led directly to WW2.
                          Seriously?
                          Кто там?
                          Это я - Почтальон Печкин!
                          Tunis is a Carthigenian city!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ShAA View Post
                            This explanation might work for ignorant fools but not for those who have read books on the subject. I mean historical books, not your worthless German fanboy fantasy scribblings
                            I am not inclined to respond to postings about "ignorant fools" or "worthless German fanboy fantasy scribblings." Let me repeat it just this once:

                            The deal was strictly between Lenin and the Political Section of the German Foreign Office: German money in return for a peace treaty with Russia. I have cited and/or quoted many principals in support. I suggest you do the same.
                            "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                              I had no idea...
                              You had no idea, but already wrote a book! Way to go. No obstacles can hold ya!
                              Kind regards
                              Igor

                              * My grandfathers WW2 memoirs - Romania, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Hungary, 1944-1945.
                              * On the question of "2 mil. rapes" by RKKA
                              * Verdicts of RKKA Military Tribunals for crimes against civilians in 1945

                              Comment

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