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  • Originally posted by tigerivan View Post
    I agree with his point of view. No use denying that there was a de facto alliance.
    Alliances require commitments. If there are no commitments then there is no alliance. It matters not one whit if you agree with him, it's still wrong.
    Signing out.

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    • The British started it in order to get rid of some rather 2nd rate poets.

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      • Originally posted by Full Monty View Post
        Alliances require commitments. If there are no commitments then there is no alliance. It matters not one whit if you agree with him, it's still wrong.
        What happened the years before the war made it pretty clear that Brittain would go with France. No formal commitments were necessary.

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        • Originally posted by Full Monty View Post
          Alliances require commitments. If there are no commitments then there is no alliance. It matters not one whit if you agree with him, it's still wrong.
          The Anglo-French military "conversations" amounted to a commitment as many British statesmen of the time confirmed. It is apparently necessary to be British to deny something this obvious.
          "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

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          • Originally posted by peterhof View Post
            The Anglo-French military "conversations" amounted to a commitment as many British statesmen of the time confirmed. It is apparently necessary to be British to deny something this obvious.
            Denying the obvious is certainly pretty stupid.

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            • Originally posted by peterhof View Post
              The Anglo-French military "conversations" amounted to a commitment as many British statesmen of the time confirmed.
              'Many' statesmen? How many? Explain Joffre's planning in this light please.
              It is apparently necessary to be British to deny something this obvious.
              Like our Belgian friend 'ljadw' or our Antipodean colleagues 'Belgrave' and 'broderickwells'? I think a new pair of glasses are in order!
              Signing out.

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              • Originally posted by Full Monty View Post
                'Many' statesmen? How many? Explain Joffre's planning in this light please.

                Like our Belgian friend 'ljadw' or our Antipodean colleagues 'Belgrave' and 'broderickwells'? I think a new pair of glasses are in order!
                Perhaps you're right. Sir Henry Wilson bicycling around Mons really meant nothing. He was simply the Lance Armstrong of his day. The British and French General Staffs were simply sharing some tea and crumpets, nothing more. Afterwards they discussed the relative merits of the women in London as compared to Paris while enjoying cigars and brandy. No, really!
                "We have met the enemy and he is us." Pogo

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                • Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                  Perhaps you're right. Sir Henry Wilson bicycling around Mons really meant nothing. He was simply the Lance Armstrong of his day. The British and French General Staffs were simply sharing some tea and crumpets, nothing more. Afterwards they discussed the relative merits of the women in London as compared to Paris while enjoying cigars and brandy. No, really!
                  So you can't answer the questions. Good, because I know I am right.
                  Signing out.

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                  • Originally posted by Full Monty View Post
                    So you can't answer the questions. Good, because I know I am right.
                    Pretty arrogant and I know you are wrong.

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                    • Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                      Perhaps you're right. Sir Henry Wilson bicycling around Mons really meant nothing. He was simply the Lance Armstrong of his day. The British and French General Staffs were simply sharing some tea and crumpets, nothing more. Afterwards they discussed the relative merits of the women in London as compared to Paris while enjoying cigars and brandy. No, really!
                      No doubt FM believes that.

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                      • Originally posted by tigerivan View Post
                        Pretty arrogant and I know you are wrong.
                        Thank you. Perhaps you could answer the questions I posed to peterhof rather than just pushing wind around?

                        I'm sure FM believes that
                        You're not even at the starting gate old chap.
                        Signing out.

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                        • Originally posted by Reggie Mental View Post
                          The British started it in order to get rid of some rather 2nd rate poets.
                          Ah- some light relief.

                          Blackadder goes Forth. Air Ace Lord Flasheart:

                          "Just because I can give multiple orgasms to the furniture just by sitting on it doesn't mean I'm not sick of this damn war. The blood, the noise, the endless poetry "
                          "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                          Samuel Johnson.

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                          • Originally posted by pasar View Post
                            I agree with his point of view. No use denying that there was a de facto alliance.
                            Ta for the clarification. I think you've got it mostly right - a de facto alliance, as opposed to a de jure alliance. Interestingly, if the Conservative Party had been the government in 1914, I'm certain the noises coming out of Britain's Foreign Minister would have been considerably more bellicose.

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                            • Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                              Perhaps you're right. Sir Henry Wilson bicycling around Mons really meant nothing. He was simply the Lance Armstrong of his day. The British and French General Staffs were simply sharing some tea and crumpets, nothing more. Afterwards they discussed the relative merits of the women in London as compared to Paris while enjoying cigars and brandy. No, really!
                              I am still waiting for proofs of the claims (from the usual suspects) about a collaboration between the French and British staffs ,proofs,as:

                              that the French and British chiefs of staff were meeting each other every year

                              that there was a joint war plan

                              that the French war plan was depending on a British intervention

                              that there were regular meetings of British and French officers :1909 :every one in Paris,1910,in London.

                              that London knew the detailed French war plans

                              that everything happened officially,with the consent of the politicians

                              that these conversations were influencing the British decision to join the war .

                              I am certain,we will read about this after the return from Vegas.

                              Or,we will never read about this ?

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                              • Originally posted by peterhof View Post
                                The Anglo-French military "conversations" amounted to a commitment as many British statesmen of the time confirmed. It is apparently necessary to be British to deny something this obvious.
                                Your key opponents thus far have been a Belgian, a Kiwi and one perfidious Englander, Herr hoff. (it's a multinational group, you can't keep squealing about your most hated foe.)
                                Putting the kybosh on German bollocks is, and always has been, a team effort.
                                Last edited by Selous; 22 Jan 13, 07:26.
                                ------
                                'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

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