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Commissioning of Guided Missile Destroyer Dewey

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  • Commissioning of Guided Missile Destroyer Dewey

    Just the latest ship in one of the most successful classes of warships in the history of the U.S. Navy; please welcome her to the fleet.



    Designated DDG 105, the new destroyer honors Adm. George Dewey (1837-1917) who commanded the Asiatic Station from the cruiser Olympia. Shortly after the onset of the Spanish-American War, Dewey led his squadron of warships into Manila Bay on April 30, 1898. The next morning, his squadron destroyed the Spanish fleet in only two hours without a single American loss. A widely popular hero of his day, Dewey was commissioned Admiral of the Navy, a rank created for him, in March 1903. Two previous ships have proudly carried his name. The first was a destroyer (DD 349) that survived the 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor and went on to receive 13 battle stars for World War II service. The second was a destroyer commissioned as a guided-missile frigate (DLG 14) before being reclassified as a guided missile destroyer (DDG 45).
    http://www.defense.gov/releases/rele...eleaseid=13356
    Last edited by Bass_Man86; 16 Mar 10, 07:47.
    Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

    Initiated Chief Petty Officer
    Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

  • #2
    She's a beauty!
    ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

    BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

    BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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    • #3
      God speed, and well wishes on your future USN career..!

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      • #4
        I was tempted to make a sarcastic comment about whether the heroic Admiral Dewey, who succeeded in destroying a bunch of completely obsolete ships with a superior force in a considerably better tactical position, deserved having a ship named after him

        But I suppose if there was a long-serving USS Dewey in World War II that makes up for it.
        My board games blog: The Brass Castle

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        • #5
          Originally posted by The Land View Post
          I was tempted to make a sarcastic comment about whether the heroic Admiral Dewey, who succeeded in destroying a bunch of completely obsolete ships with a superior force in a considerably better tactical position, deserved having a ship named after him

          But I suppose if there was a long-serving USS Dewey in World War II that makes up for it.
          Land, look up my old boat (USS Curtis Wilbur), and if you can think of any valid reason why a ship was named after that man, please let me know; at least Dewey was a) a sailor, and b) was in actual combat.
          Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

          Initiated Chief Petty Officer
          Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

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          • #6
            I applaud the building of a new Missile Destroyer, but what we need are cheap escorts like the O.H. Perry. Anyone else notice that we retired a lot of Missile Destroyers built since the 70's? They weren't that old!

            Pruitt
            Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

            Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

            by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
              I applaud the building of a new Missile Destroyer, but what we need are cheap escorts like the O.H. Perry. Anyone else notice that we retired a lot of Missile Destroyers built since the 70's? They weren't that old!

              Pruitt
              Completely agree P; see my new tread on Navy cutters.
              Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

              Initiated Chief Petty Officer
              Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

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              • #8
                May she have a glorious career.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bass_man86 View Post
                  Land, look up my old boat (USS Curtis Wilbur), and if you can think of any valid reason why a ship was named after that man, please let me know; at least Dewey was a) a sailor, and b) was in actual combat.
                  From http://www.curtis-wilbur.navy.mil/Si.../namesake.aspx
                  "
                  Born in Boonesboro, Iowa on May 10, 1867, he was appointed to the United States Naval Academy in 1884. While at Annapolis, Curtis Wilbur excelled in leadership, sports and academics. He graduated third in his class, and achieved additional athletic fame as the academy hitch-kick champion.

                  Shortly after graduation, Curtis Wilbur resigned his commission, which was a common practice since the number of academy graduates usually exceeded the number of available positions.

                  On March 19, 1924, Curtis D. Wilbur was sworn in as Secretary of the Navy after being nominated to the position by President Calvin Coolidge. The first appointee of Coolidge, Wilbur came into the position with a reputation as a man of high intellect and a character of "unimpeachable integrity."

                  Curtis D. WilburCurtis Wilbur immediately went to work. He worked with Congress for the proper funds to build and maintain an operational Fleet. He also emphasized the importance of naval education, argued for new cruisers, instituted aviation courses at Annapolis, backed the development of the air-cooled engine and repeatedly spoke out on world-wide threats. By the end of his term, Curtis Wilbur had achieved success in enlarging and modernizing the fleet, and had established a naval air force which would grow to become a overwhelming force in World War II."
                  Well Bass_man, he doesn't seem to have been much of a sailor, but he sounds like one of the better bosses the Navy has had, and one of the sharper minds given that he managed to grasp the importance of naval air power before its importance was proven. Surely there are worse names in the US fleet?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Demon_Llama View Post
                    From http://www.curtis-wilbur.navy.mil/Si.../namesake.aspx


                    Well Bass_man, he doesn't seem to have been much of a sailor, but he sounds like one of the better bosses the Navy has had, and one of the sharper minds given that he managed to grasp the importance of naval air power before its importance was proven. Surely there are worse names in the US fleet?
                    Well, since you put it that way. It struck as, well to put it charitably, odd that the Navy named a ship after a civilian; he may have graduated from Annapolis, but since he resigned his comission upon graduation to me that does not count as time in the military.
                    Give me a fast ship and the wind at my back for I intend to sail in harms way! (John Paul Jones)

                    Initiated Chief Petty Officer
                    Hard core! Old School! Deal with it!

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