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NGFS and large bombardment forces

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  • NGFS and large bombardment forces

    I'm assuming there was someone on a flag ship designating zones, or something for each ship to cover during a bombardment, particularly during the landing itself, so does anyone know the specifics of how that worked?
    the answer is on the floor- john roseberry

    A tiger dies and leaves his fur,
    A man dies and leaves his name,
    A teacher dies and teaches death.
    Seikchi Toguchi 1917-1998

  • #2
    I believe each NGFSO would have a frequency of their assigned ship and that ship would know the grids of where that person would be operating. That's just s WAG, though.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by johns624 View Post
      I believe each NGFSO would have a frequency of their assigned ship and that ship would know the grids of where that person would be operating. That's just s WAG, though.
      in a situation with 1 ship sure, but i was think more like during d-day or any of the pacific bombardments where you had an entire fleet firing ashore.

      pretty simple to do it when there's just one ship.
      the answer is on the floor- john roseberry

      A tiger dies and leaves his fur,
      A man dies and leaves his name,
      A teacher dies and teaches death.
      Seikchi Toguchi 1917-1998

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      • #4
        Originally posted by General_Jacke View Post

        in a situation with 1 ship sure, but i was think more like during d-day or any of the pacific bombardments where you had an entire fleet firing ashore.

        pretty simple to do it when there's just one ship.
        That's what I said...each land unit, probably battalion (or company) sized, would have a separate ship assigned to them.

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        • #5
          From: https://www.history.navy.mil/content...l-support.html
          Okinawa Campaign: U.S. Naval Gunfire Support: April-June 1945

          During the Okinawa Campaign, the U.S. Navy regularly delivered supplies and naval gunfire support. Each regiment had two ships assigned to it, including a destroyer for star-shell illumination at night. A battleship, or cruiser, supported each division. Each corps had one or two battleships, or cruisers, on call. The warships fired almost 300,000 rounds of five-inch or larger shells. The warships were aided in bombing efforts by the aerial squadrons of Task Group 58. Task Force aircraft flew over 40,000 sorties and dropped 8,500 tons of bombs and fired approximately 50,000 rockets. The Japanese, with Operation Ten-Go, tried to suppress this support with the use of Kamikazes (suicide planes) to damage the warships from April to June 1945.

          Too Much To Do Too Little Time

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