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Cold War fighters still in service.

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  • Cold War fighters still in service.

    Brazil has 4 modernized A-4KUs and 3 for training. Part of their naval aviation arm, which comprise of 85 aircraft, 7 Skyhawks and the rest are helicopters.

    2560px-Aniversário_da_Aviação_Naval_(cropped).jpg
    "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
    Ernest Hemingway.

    "The more I learn about people, The more I love my dog".
    Mark Twain.

  • #2
    It's a classic design that with some upgrade could be a bargain aircraft for many users, IMO.
    Excerpt/Quote;
    ......
    The Douglas A-4 Skyhawk is a single-seat subsonic carrier-capable light attack aircraft developed for the United States Navy and United States Marine Corps in the early 1950s. The delta-winged, single turbojet engined Skyhawk was designed and produced by Douglas Aircraft Company, and later by McDonnell Douglas. It was originally designated A4D under the U.S. Navy's pre-1962 designation system.

    The Skyhawk is a relatively lightweight aircraft, with a maximum takeoff weight of 24,500 pounds (11,100 kg), and has a top speed of 670 miles per hour (1,080 km/h). The aircraft's five hardpoints support a variety of missiles, bombs, and other munitions. It is capable of carrying a bomb load equivalent to that of a World War II–era Boeing B-17 bomber, and can deliver nuclear weapons using a low-altitude bombing system and a "loft" delivery technique. The A-4 was originally powered by the Wright J65 turbojet engine; from the A-4E onwards, the Pratt & Whitney J52 engine was used.

    Skyhawks played key roles in the Vietnam War, the Yom Kippur War, and the Falklands War. Sixty years after the aircraft's first flight in 1954, some of the 2,960 produced (through February 1979)[1] remain in service with the Argentine Air Force and the Brazilian Naval Aviation.
    ...........
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_A-4_Skyhawk
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
    Present Current Events are the Future's History

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    • #3
      The MiG 21 is still in service with a number of countries, mostly poorer ones with tin pot dictators.

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      • #4
        The F15, F16 and F18 were all Cold War fighters and they are still in service. As are the Su27 and Mig 29. Lots of Cold War fighters are still in service.
        Last edited by Surrey; 09 Aug 20, 17:25.
        "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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        • #5
          Technically the A-4 is an attack aircraft of which there are many countries operating Cold War era attack aircraft and some "multirole" fighters that are more attack than fighter, given the technological gap where modern multirole fighters far outclass older multirole fighters. There are four generations of fighters that span the Cold War (1947-1991). I've always been interested in which countries still fly fighters from that era, either as original air frames with little changes since that period or as upgraded air frames. Especially interested in events where pilots flying older fighters have bested pilots flying much newer and advanced fighters. Here is a list of Cold War era fighters and their current operators. I may be missing some as my sources (Wiki) are not extensive or up to date organized roughly from oldest to newest. Maybe I can make a list for Cold War attack aircraft as well.

          MiG-15:
          Guinea-Bissau, North Korea

          MiG-17:
          Guinea-Bissau, Madagascar, Somalia

          Shenyang J-5 (Chinese MiG-17):
          North Korea

          Shenyang J-6 (Chinese MiG-19):
          Bangladesh, China, Myanmar, North Korea, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Zambia

          Chengdu J-7 (Chinese MiG-21):
          Bangladesh, China, Egypt, Iran, Myanmar, Namibia, Nigeria, North Korea, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Tanzania

          MiG-21:
          Angola, Azerbaijan, Croatia, Cuba, Egypt, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, India, Libya, Mali, Mozambique, North Korea, Romania, Serbia, Sudan, Syria, Uganda, Yemen, Zambia

          Dassault Mirage III:
          Pakistan

          Dassault Mirage 5:
          Gabon, Pakistan

          Northrop F-5:
          Botswana, Brazil, Chile, Honduras, Iran, Kenya, Mexico, Morocco, Switzerland, Thailand, Tunisia

          Su-7:
          North Korea

          AV-8B Harrier II:
          Italy, Spain, United States

          F-4 Phantom II:
          Greece, Iran, Japan, South Korea, Turkey

          Dassault Mirage F1:
          Gabon, Iran, Morocco

          Atlas Cheetah ( Dassault Mirage III upgrade):
          Ecuador

          MiG-23:
          Angola, Cuba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Libya, North Korea, Sudan, Syria

          MiG-25:
          Algeria, Libya, Syria

          MiG-27:
          Kazakhstan

          Shenyang J-8:
          China

          IAI Kfir:
          Colombia, Sri Lanka

          F-14 Tomcat:
          Iran

          F-15 Eagle:
          Israel, Japan, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, South Korea, United States

          F-16 Fighting Falcon:
          Bahrain, Belgium, Chile, Denmark, Egypt, Greece, Israel, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Morocco, Netherlands, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand, Turkey, Taiwan (Republic of China), United Arab Emirates, United States, Venezuela

          F/A-18 Hornet:
          Australia, Canada, Finland, Kuwait, Malaysia, Spain, Switzerland, United States

          MiG-31:
          Kazakhstan, Russia

          MiG-29:
          Algeria, Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Belarus, Bulgaria, Chad, Cuba, Eritrea, India, Iran, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, North Korea, Peru, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Sudan, Syria, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, Uzbekistan

          Su-27:
          Angola, China, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Mongolia, Russia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Vietnam

          Dassault Mirage 2000:
          Egypt, France, Greece, India, Peru, Qatar, Taiwan, United Arab Emirates
          Last edited by Frtigern; 09 Aug 20, 22:15.
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          • #6
            F-117 Nighthawks now flying as adversaries in Navy aerial war games

            https://warisboring.com/f-117-nighth...ial-war-games/
            Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
              F-117 Nighthawks now flying as adversaries in Navy aerial war games

              https://warisboring.com/f-117-nighth...ial-war-games/
              Kept getting pop-up ads blocking the page, nuisance ...

              Here's a better link and more extensive article (and less intrusive)
              F-117 Nighthawks Now Appear To Be Flying As Adversaries In Red Flag Aerial War Games

              The F-117 force's presence over the southwestern U.S. has greatly expanded in recent years. Now it appears to have taken on a formal aggressor role.


              By Tyler RogowayAugust 15, 2020
              https://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zon...rial-war-games
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              “War is merely the continuation of politics by other means” - von Clausewitz
              Present Current Events are the Future's History

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              • #8
                Iranian F-14, still in service but exactly how many is undetermined... probably just over twenty.

                Iranian_Air_Force_Grumman_F-14A_Tomcat_%28remix%29.jpg

                One IRIAF pilot distinguished himself in combat by becoming the all-time top scoring F-14 ace. Major Jalil Zandi is credited with shooting down eight Iraqi aircraft. He is additionally credited with three probable kills, bringing his total to 11 air victories. These include four MiG-23s, two Su-22s, two MiG-21 and three Mirage F1s.

                400px-Jalil_Zandi-.jpg

                Video of an Iranian F-14 escorting a Tu-95 over Syria.

                "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                Ernest Hemingway.

                "The more I learn about people, The more I love my dog".
                Mark Twain.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Achtung Baby View Post
                  Iranian F-14, still in service but exactly how many is undetermined... probably just over twenty.

                  Iranian_Air_Force_Grumman_F-14A_Tomcat_%28remix%29.jpg

                  One IRIAF pilot distinguished himself in combat by becoming the all-time top scoring F-14 ace. Major Jalil Zandi is credited with shooting down eight Iraqi aircraft. He is additionally credited with three probable kills, bringing his total to 11 air victories. These include four MiG-23s, two Su-22s, two MiG-21 and three Mirage F1s.

                  400px-Jalil_Zandi-.jpg

                  Video of an Iranian F-14 escorting a Tu-95 over Syria.

                  Amazed at how the Iranians have managed to keep them in service. Where do they get spare parts from?
                  "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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                  • #10
                    With a boutique range of aircraft to service, they might just produce them artisanally. It can be done. You treat each aircraft pretty much like a prototype, and spares don't come off some production line, but are manufactured as one-offs, to the highest standard you can achieve like that.

                    (It's one of these things the Russians might be doing, and why the new T-50 fighter will be produced precisely in a boutique range of twenty or so. It's nut just that they are wildly expensive, it might also be – as their former Indian partners blew the lid on – that Russia struggles to set up an industrial production line that can handle the specs. In which case an alternative is precisely to continue to build them artisanally. They will work, and be as brilliant as the design allows for, it will just be very difficult to get them in any kind of numbers anytime soon.)

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                    • #11
                      Well, if we are commenting about Cold War aircraft, how is this for a picture? A Croatian MiG-21 escorting USAF B-52 over Croatian airspace a few days ago.


                      Croatian MiGs.png
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