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Squadron, Flight, Element?

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  • Squadron, Flight, Element?

    TWhat is the best universal term for describing a pair of aircraft? I am looking for a generic term to use across nations for a tactical ground war game that will have aircraft in ground support. The aircraft unit will be a pair of aircraft of a given type.

  • #2
    A "flight" I think ?

    A "wing" is divided in "squadrons", a squadron in "flights" usually named after the commander or by some codename.

    Of course just two planes isn't really a military formation, still I would call it a "flight x" belonging to "squadron y"
    High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.
    Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Co.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
      A "flight" I think ?

      A "wing" is divided in "squadrons", a squadron in "flights" usually named after the commander or by some codename.

      Of course just two planes isn't really a military formation, still I would call it a "flight x" belonging to "squadron y"
      I think you are more or less correct but I think that a flight is normally at least four aircraft as I've seen references to half flights which logically would mean that a flight has to be at least divisible by two with a result greater than one. I suspect that two aircraft may be a section
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • #4
        My assumption is that it would be better to model a pair of aircraft in ground support than either single or four.

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        • #5
          Certainly modern planes (can) operate in pairs for CAS missions, it's just that the pair of them wouldn't be a complete "unit", but just two planes of a larger unit.

          Shouldn't keep you from modelling them as such in a game, you can always "stack" them to make the full unit if needed.
          High Admiral Snowy, Commander In Chief of the Naval Forces of The Phoenix Confederation.
          Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Co.

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          • #6
            Many 'air forces' operate on the basis of an "element", which is a pair of aircraft: a leader and a wingman.

            Usually 2 or 3 elements make a flight.

            Squadrons usually number from about 12-18, depending on nation/military and time frame/period.

            Though this board game is nearly thirty years old, it still is a classic and covers basics of aircraft operations. Nominally the F/A-18 squadron is composed of 12 aircraft and about 15 pilots. Each pilot has a card to represent them that gives their rating for initiative, aggression, air-to-air and air-to-ground skill, etc. Along with a map-board for movement of aircraft in the mission zone, it also allows for a display for each aircraft to show its ordnance load, condition, etc. There is also a missions deck, conditions deck, and random events deck, so it's rare any one mission will play the same. It's recommend that one form up the "flight" for a mission in elements/pairs, and recommended mission strengths range from 2 to 12 aircraft. You can use more than recommended number for a point/score penalty, or less than recommended for a point bonus.

            This is a solitaire game and one plays a campaign of several missions, operating in different parts of the world. Pilot fatigue or "shatter" is a factor to consider, so usually you will rotate aircraft and aircrews for different missions and try to avoid using plane/pilot combos on back to back missions.

            https://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/6927/hornet-leader

            In web-searching, I noticed there is a PC version, which I may have to consider getting;
            http://www.matrixgames.com/products/...rnet.Leader.PC

            BTW, usually two or more(3-4) squadrons will form a Group

            A number of Groups will form a Wing.

            A number of Wings will form an 'Air Force' (Such as USAAF Eight Air Force).
            TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch

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