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  • Good news about a Canberra

    A record breaking Canberra is to be restored to flying condition. This particular aircraft holds the record for the first un-refueled transatlantic jet flight and one held a world altitude record
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36352330
    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

  • #2
    Originally posted by MarkV View Post
    A record breaking Canberra is to be restored to flying condition. This particular aircraft holds the record for the first un-refueled transatlantic jet flight and one held a world altitude record
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36352330
    And from the BBC article quoted:

    English Electric Canberra WK163 was the first aircraft in history to complete a transatlantic flight without refuelling, and once held the world altitude record.
    You(and the writer of the BBC article that you quoted) have got your information confused.

    The aircraft being restored(Canberra B6/WK163) did indeed gain the world altitude record in 1957.

    http://www.warbirdregistry.org/jetre...rra-wk163.html

    However, this particular aircraft was not produced until 1954(accepted for RAF service in 1955), whereas the first jet unrefueled crossing of the Atlantic took place in 1951.

    First jet aircraft to make a non-stop transatlantic flight

    On 21 February 1951, an RAF English Electric Canberra B Mk 2 (serial number WD932) flown by Squadron Leader A Callard of the A&AEE, flew from Aldergrove Northern Ireland, to Gander, Newfoundland. The flight covered almost 1,800 nautical miles (3,300 km) in 4h 37 m. The aircraft was being flown to the U.S. to act as a pattern aircraft for the Martin B-57 Canberra.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Transatlantic_flight

    However, thanks for this welcome news about the restoration.
    Last edited by At ease; 22 May 16, 08:27.
    "It's like shooting rats in a barrel."
    "You'll be in a barrel if you don't watch out for the fighters!"

    "Talking about airplanes is a very pleasant mental disease."
    ó Sergei(son of Igor) Sikorsky, 'AOPA Pilot' magazine February 2003.

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    • #3
      That's great news!
      Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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      • #4
        At ease - Ref. your mention of the Martin B57 Canberra; my father-in-law was sent over to assist in it's development. He was considered as an expert [in the RAF], in hydraulics and pneumatics.

        He commented upon how generous and attentive the Americans were to his every need and requirement. He aquired a bearskin hat while involved in tests in Alaska.

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        • #5
          If my info is right, it's the same mob who put the Vulcan on the airshow circuit, who are now restoring the Canberra. I get their newsletter and it's mentioned on there. Makes me feel a tad old that I can remember all these kites, then in full Raff service, coming down the sky at RAF Finningley in the sixties... Lightening's doing a sonic boom and the windscreen cracking on mi' Dad's Dormobile!

          The long toll of the brave
          Is not lost in darkness
          Over the fruitful earth
          And athwart the seas
          Hath passed the light of noble deeds
          Unquenchable forever.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Von Richter View Post
            If my info is right, it's the same mob who put the Vulcan on the airshow circuit, who are now restoring the Canberra. I get their newsletter and it's mentioned on there. Makes me feel a tad old that I can remember all these kites, then in full Raff service, coming down the sky at RAF Finningley in the sixties... Lightening's doing a sonic boom and the windscreen cracking on mi' Dad's Dormobile!

            I can remember hearing the P1 (effectively the Lightening prototype) going through the sound barrier over the Irish Sea not long after we'd moved from Sligo to Preston
            Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
            Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MarkV View Post
              I can remember hearing the P1 (effectively the Lightening prototype) going through the sound barrier over the Irish Sea not long after we'd moved from Sligo to Preston
              Aside from the crack of whips, my first experience of sonic bangs/booms were from a pair of RAF Hawker Hunters involved in high speed dives over Catterick Camp, in the first half of the 1950s - before I left for a month long cruise on a troopship to Hong Kong, which was mid 1955.

              I do remember a quintet of Soviet Su27s making a rapid take-off at a Finningly Airshow, and setting off hundreds of car alarms!

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              • #8
                I think the Lightening was the first British operational fighter that could exceed Mach 1 whilst climbing. I can certainly remember hearing a RR tape of a test pilot going "point nine five, point nine eight, one point one - still climbing".
                I did hear that the Saunders Roe Saunders-Roe SR.53 rocket /turbo jet interceptor achieved this on one test flight and it was part of the spec for the 2.5 Mach Saunders Roe SR.177 before the project was cancelled in defence cuts.
                Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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                • #9
                  It seems NASA's Canberras have been busy in Afghanistan over the last decade.


                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martin/General_Dynamics_RB-57F_Canberra#Survivors
                  ALL LIVES SPLATTER!

                  BLACK JEEPS MATTER!

                  BLACK MOTORCYCLES MATTER!

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                  • #10
                    Gentlemen - the name of the British fighter you are discussing is Lightning NOT Lightening.

                    During the early1970s, while stationed at RAF Lakenheath flying Phantoms, I got the opportunity for one flight in the Lightning at RAF Coltshall. This was of course a two seat version and unfortunately I donít remember the assigned squadron. The thing I remember most was the excellent handling qualities of the aircraft compared to the Phantom especially in pitch. A very shot legged aircraft, however, and it seemed like we were out of gas just after we got airborne. This led to the reputation that Coltshall had among our Lakenheath pilots as a great place to divert to when the weather was really nasty as the GCA lads there were outstanding in their craft. We assumed that was because the Lightnings were always short on fuel and couldnít make very many missed approaches.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                      I think the Lightening was the first British operational fighter that could exceed Mach 1 whilst climbing. I can certainly remember hearing a RR tape of a test pilot going "point nine five, point nine eight, one point one - still climbing".
                      I did hear that the Saunders Roe Saunders-Roe SR.53 rocket /turbo jet interceptor achieved this on one test flight and it was part of the spec for the 2.5 Mach Saunders Roe SR.177 before the project was cancelled in defence cuts.
                      Defence cuts. ? The Saunders-Roe aircraft were a victim of the notorious Conservative 1957 White Paper (Defence Minister Duncan Sandys) which affirmed that the RAF were unlikely to require any more manned fighters !

                      This catastrophic Paper put an abrupt end to several promising projects. Fortunately, the P1B( Lightning) was adjudged,officially,as being too far in development to cancel, although a scheme to fit a rocket engine to the aircraft was terminated.

                      This would have beenin addition to the twin afterburning engines fitted :the performance would have been truly phenomenal:- although the endurance of the aircraft,which was marginal anyway,would have been problematical.
                      Last edited by BELGRAVE; 24 May 16, 03:35.
                      "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                      Samuel Johnson.

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