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  • A-10 Thunderbolt II Gets New Wings

    The A-10 Thunderbolt II plays a key role in protecting our troops and itís about to get a makeover.
    The U.S. Air Forceís A-10 Warthog, a twin-engine jet designed for close air support of ground forces, is receiving new wings that will improve mission availability and help save the Air Force an estimated $1.3 billion in maintenance costs over the next 30 years.
    In recent months, Boeing was awarded three follow-on orders for a total of 56 replacement wings and is on contract to build up to 242 wings at its plant in Macon, Ga.
    The A-10 is known for its excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and its ability to deliver weapons with great accuracy. A-10s can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings and 1.5-mile visibility. With its significant range and short takeoff and landing capability, it is uniquely suited to serve in and out of locations near the front lines.
    This makeover will allow the A-10 to continue to protect our troops and to operate into 2035.

    http://boeing.rollcall.com/topic-a/s...-freedom-2035/

    Credo quia absurdum.


    Quantum mechanics describes nature as absurd from the point of view of common sense. And yet it fully agrees with experiment. So I hope you can accept nature as She is - absurd! - Richard Feynman

  • #2
    I thought that the Air Force was out to kill the Warthog.
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Tsar View Post
      I thought that the Air Force was out to kill the Warthog.
      They failed.

      As usual, the safest place to be is when the USAF plans to bomb.

      They need to give the Warthog a night/all weather capability, too.
      Any man can hold his place when the bands play and women throw flowers; it is when the enemy presses close and metal shears through the ranks that one can acertain which are soldiers, and which are not.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Tsar View Post
        I thought that the Air Force was out to kill the Warthog.
        In fact, that article is almost 3 years old.

        Last year, despite new wings, USAF was firmly convinced in decision to retire A-10 by 2019 because of financial reasons (with one top USAF general warning officers that praising the A-10 attack plane to lawmakers amounts to "treason") however key provisions in 2016 Defense Bill prevent the Air Force from using any of its budget allocation to retire, prepare to retire, or place into storage any A-10 aircraft. Defense Bill report also contains a strongly-worded prohibition against reductions in A-10 manning before the end of 2016, leaving Congress time to pass another defense budget before the service can diminish its A-10 capability.

        That means A-10 will fly at least until 2022! Afterwards, A-10 frames will start approaching their structural expiration date anyway and logical step would be a replacement aircraft (unmanned possibly) unless F-35 centric doctrine philosophy stops that too.
        It is always more difficult to fight against faith than against knowledge.

        Косово је Србија!
        Never go to war with a country whose national holiday celebrates a defeat in 1389.

        Armored Brigade

        Armored Brigade Facebook page

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        • #5
          F35 centric doctrine will stop that. The Fighter Mafia is convinced that not only CAN the F35 provide all the CAS that is needed, the F35 SHOULD provide all the CAS that is needed.

          Ironically the USAF's obsession with hyper-expensive Stealth aircraft at the expense of all others is likely to be the downfall of the USAF as a manned aviation force. Impossible to justify, the cost is, of risking hundred million dollar aircraft on strafing tribesmen with rifles and cheap MANPADs. And if all you're going to do is deploy PGMs from 20k feet, then you might as well just use a UCAV, as the pilot is literally no better informed about what he's attacking than a controller stateside.

          And so fixed wing CAS will simply die off, and without that, the USAF will lose a lot of its combat mission profile, since it'll just be needed to transport the Army into combat and the Army will actually do all the fighting with its more budget friendly assets. The Air Force will stand stalwart against the Red Menace........until someone remembers that the Red Menace no longer exists, at which time the Air Force will be seen as a white elephant with no viable remaining mission profile that cannot be done better/faster/cheaper by another service or private contractors.
          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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          • #6
            Originally posted by nikolas93TS View Post
            In fact, that article is almost 3 years old.
            I believe the article is about the last increment in the re-wing program.

            February 4/16: The life of the A-10 attack jet will be extended external link external link until 2022 after it was announced in Secretary for Defense Ash Carterís 2017 defense budget preview on Tuesday. Lawmakers including former A-10 pilot Rep. Martha McSally and Sen. John McCain who supported the planeís continuation were pleased with the announcement. The close-air support aircraft will continue to see service in the operations against the Islamic State in the Middle East where it has been supporting ground troops. The deferral of the A-10ís retirement comes as continued delays seem likely for the F-35, which is due to replace the A-10 once it comes into active service. The A-10ís ability to swoop in to heights of 50 feet above ground and engage enemies has been held up as an advantage against the F-35 by supporters.
            LINK

            May 15, 2015: With the current Boeing-led re-winging programme part of this wider TLPS, the USAF looks set to complete the project given that it is already so far along. In June Boeing said that 105 wingsets had been completed and delivered back to the USAF, with the contract set to run through to the first quarter of 2017.
            LINK

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Bwaha View Post
              The A-10 Thunderbolt II plays a key role in protecting our troops and itís about to get a makeover.
              The U.S. Air Forceís A-10 Warthog, a twin-engine jet designed for close air support of ground forces, is receiving new wings that will improve mission availability and help save the Air Force an estimated $1.3 billion in maintenance costs over the next 30 years.
              In recent months, Boeing was awarded three follow-on orders for a total of 56 replacement wings and is on contract to build up to 242 wings at its plant in Macon, Ga.
              The A-10 is known for its excellent maneuverability at low air speeds and altitude, and its ability to deliver weapons with great accuracy. A-10s can loiter near battle areas for extended periods of time and operate under 1,000-foot ceilings and 1.5-mile visibility. With its significant range and short takeoff and landing capability, it is uniquely suited to serve in and out of locations near the front lines.
              This makeover will allow the A-10 to continue to protect our troops and to operate into 2035.

              http://boeing.rollcall.com/topic-a/s...-freedom-2035/

              The government will save $1.3 billion over 30 years on maint. This makeover
              to operate onto 2035. That's typical of our government, overstating the savings.

              Comment


              • #8
                Just three days ago this was announced in our local news..


                BOISE, Idaho (KBOI) - More than 500 members of the Idaho Air National Guard will be sent to the Middle East this spring and summer to help with the fight against ISIS.

                The Guard says the deployment of their A-10s in the 124th Fighter Wing based at Gowen Field is part of Operation Inherent Resolve.

                "This mission, part of its federal responsibility, is in response to the Department of Defense looking at our capabilities and our talents and we fit the bill for this deployment," said Major Chris Borders, the public affairs officer for the Idaho National Guard.

                Officials say they will be sending multiple aircraft, pilots, maintenance personnel, security forces, medical personnel, and various other support staff.

                "This deployment highlights the dedication of the 124th Fighter Wing and its members, as well as the community of families, state and local leaders, neighbors and employers who have demonstrated once again their steadfast and unwavering support of Idaho's service members," Governor C.L. "Butch" Otter said in a press release. "The impact on the community is recognized and their sacrifice is deeply appreciated."

                The Guard says deployments typically last 180 days and that personnel will travel in smaller groups over the next few months.

                "This is what we do, this is the culminating event for our guard members," Borders said. "This probably might very well be a highlight in an airman's career."

                The A-10 Thunderbolt II, nicknamed the Warthog, has been in the center of controversy recently, as the Pentagon has been trying to retire the aircraft in favor of the new F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter, which has been plagued by delays during its development.
                http://kboi2.com/news/local/idaho-ai...in-middle-east
                Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it everywhere, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedies.

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                • #9
                  Say "Thank you!" for me planning and then doing a major building upgrade to Davis Monthan's Metals Tech Group about ten years ago. That greatly increased the efficiency and productivity of the people making replacement parts for A-10's stationed there...

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