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Depleted uranium vs Depleted uranium?

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  • Depleted uranium vs Depleted uranium?

    I may be showing my ignorance here but If depleted uranium munitions can penetrate thick armor but depleted uranium armor can withstand anything you throw at it, what happens then if you fire DU ammunition against DU armor? Who wins?

  • #2
    Depends on were you hit it.
    My worst jump story:
    My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
    As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
    No lie.

    ~
    "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
    -2 Commando Jumpmaster

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    • #3
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irresistible_force_paradox

      An unstoppable force meets an immovable object...



      But yes, I'll agree with Vet - depends on the energy, shape, etc of the projectile, the thickness, configuration, etc of the armor, etc...
      Surrender? NutZ!
      -Varro

      Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys; look on them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death. -Sun Tzu

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      • #4
        Thanks, so it seems its at least theoretically or technically possible to penetrate DU armor with DU munitions another one of those things where it comes down to the skill of the soldiers involved and probably a bit of luck as well.

        I did hear 1 account from the 2003 Iraq invasion where 3 Iraqi T-72 tanks fired at 1 Abrams tank, the Abrams survived and was able to take each T-72 with just 1 round per tank without any trouble but then i don't think the Iraqis would have had DU armor would they?

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        • #5
          Not sure of the specific incident but it is feasible. Only the US uses DU as part of its armor package because of the cost, weight, fabrication difficulties and the fact that DU is a leftover from the creation of nuclear fuels and weapons.

          DU vs. DU - none of this is magic. Mostly it is just physics backed up by complicated mathematics. It takes "x" amount of energy to get through "y" amount of any given type of armor for a set thickness and geometry. You can find out more at tanknet.org if you like.
          Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

          Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

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          • #6
            It's the same equation as steel vs. steel except there's DU dust floating around after the impact.

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            • #7
              Yes. Only a matter of time before the tankers "glow" in the dark.
              "We have no white flag."

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              • #8
                A water jet under enough pressure can cut through steel..

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GMan88 View Post
                  Yes. Only a matter of time before the tankers "glow" in the dark.

                  DU gives off little radiation. Most of the radioactive U-235 has been extracted from it.

                  Like other heavy metals in its class such as lead, DU is highly toxic to the human body. Since it is so dense, hard and brittle, ammunition made from it tends to shatter and burn from the heat upon impact, which creates a lot of this toxic dust.

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depleted_uranium
                  “Breaking News,”

                  “Something irrelevant in your life just happened and now we are going to blow it all out of proportion for days to keep you distracted from what's really going on.”

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
                    DU gives off little radiation. Most of the radioactive U-235 has been extracted from it.

                    Like other heavy metals in its class such as lead, DU is highly toxic to the human body. Since it is so dense, hard and brittle, ammunition made from it tends to shatter and burn from the heat upon impact, which creates a lot of this toxic dust.

                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depleted_uranium
                    Unfortunately using DU ammo seems to have some serious nasty side effects indeed ...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gulf_War_syndrome
                    ' Because it has Electrolytes ! '

                    regards:
                    Henk

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by GCoyote View Post
                      DU vs. DU - none of this is magic. Mostly it is just physics backed up by complicated mathematics. It takes "x" amount of energy to get through "y" amount of any given type of armor for a set thickness and geometry. You can find out more at tanknet.org if you like.
                      I was going to say exactly that. DU isn't a magic substance. It's a material with desirable properties if you're trying to armour a tank, or build a more effective projectile. Mainly because it's extremely dense.
                      My board games blog: The Brass Castle

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                      • #12
                        Nothing complicated...

                        It's simply a convenient, relatively easy to work with very dense metal. It's all about kinetic energy(KE). And KE pretty much depends on two things:

                        1. The mass of the thing that is moving.

                        2. The velocity at which the thing moves.

                        So is you can increase either, or both; you put more energy into the recipient. DU is a nice way to increase the mass.
                        Save America!! Impeach Obama!!

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                        • #13
                          The design of the DU penetrator round is critical.



                          Originally posted by Sino Invasion View Post
                          It's simply a convenient, relatively easy to work with very dense metal. It's all about kinetic energy(KE). And KE pretty much depends on two things:

                          1. The mass of the thing that is moving.

                          2. The velocity at which the thing moves.

                          So is you can increase either, or both; you put more energy into the recipient. DU is a nice way to increase the mass.
                          My worst jump story:
                          My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                          As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                          No lie.

                          ~
                          "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                          -2 Commando Jumpmaster

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                          • #14
                            Pound for pound, Chobham armor is better than DU armor, both cost wise and protectively.
                            Battles are dangerous affairs... Wang Hsi

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by SRV Ron View Post
                              DU gives off little radiation. Most of the radioactive U-235 has been extracted from it.

                              Like other heavy metals in its class such as lead, DU is highly toxic to the human body. Since it is so dense, hard and brittle, ammunition made from it tends to shatter and burn from the heat upon impact, which creates a lot of this toxic dust.

                              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depleted_uranium
                              Still, I wouldn't breathe too deeply in a tank like that. A little is still a little too much, we're talking DU here...


                              GMan
                              "We have no white flag."

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