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Gun Care for precision Long Range Rifles.

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  • Gun Care for precision Long Range Rifles.

    I have few Long Range Target Rifles that I have lately been cleaning with an All In One cleaner Lubricator like CLP Break Free and Kleen Bore Formula 3 Gun conditioner(The solution Bottle claims it cleans, lubricates and prevents rust).

    Now I am hearing that these products are ok for chrome lined Military issued service rifles but not appropriate for precison high end Target rifles.
    So is it better to use a seperate solvent to clean all the cartridge residue and then just use a seperate gun oil or is it all right to use an all purpose do it all single product.

  • #2
    You need some kind of good quality copper remover for the bore. ProShot works good for everyday cleaning and it's good to have a bottle of Sweets on hand if they have not been kept up. The thing to remember is to stay on top of cleaning in the first place so they don't get badly fouled. My guess is that if you haven't been using a copper remover and there's more than a few rounds down the tube you've already got a ton of fouling. After my precision guns are broken in they get cleaned every 10 rounds, no exceptions. All shots and cleaning is recorded in the rifle's dope book.

    Hoppes or some other GP solvent for everything else. You'll need a grease for lubricating the firing pin spring inside the bolt barrel, everything else should be dry after cleaning. Make sure to take care of the optic and any bedding compound by covering them with a rag while cleaning. The right tools: torque wrenches, bolt disassembly tools, bold recess tools, rods, brushes, jags, patches, etc., will make the process go alot faster and more efficiently.

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    • #3
      Thank you

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      • #4
        Lance, that's very practical, useful information. Thanks - I am getting a Savage 12 F/TR soon (my first real "long range" rifle) and it is helpful to know.

        As you have probably seen, the barrel break-in process is subject to a lot of conflicting information.
        "There are only two professions in the world in which the amateur excels the professional. One, military strategy, and, two, prostitution."
        -- Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

        (Avatar: Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, Republic of Texas Navy)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jon Jordan View Post
          Lance, that's very practical, useful information. Thanks - I am getting a Savage 12 F/TR soon (my first real "long range" rifle) and it is helpful to know.

          As you have probably seen, the barrel break-in process is subject to a lot of conflicting information.
          You're right, there are a ton of break in methods. The theory behind it is to seal up the microfisures in any non-chrome lined barrel so as to reduce future copper fouling and thus accuracy degradation. It makes cleaning easier in the long run as well since, as the fisures are eliminated during the break in period, there is only copper on the surface of the lands and grooves rather than getting into the actual metal of the barrel. This is perhaps an oversimplification but still realistic none the less.

          The bottom line is that for the first 200 or so rounds you'll be cleaning quite a bit. Personally I clean after every round for the fist 10 rounds. Then after every two rounds for the next 20, every three rounds for the next 30, every four rounds for the next 40. That takes us up to 100 shots down range so far. I then clean after every five for the next 50 and then every six for the next 60 which takes us up to 210. This process usually takes several days based on how the weapons are cleaned. After that, IF the rifle is shooting the way it should, cleaning is progressing as it should, and the weapon is really clean with no blue patches, I clean it after every 10 rounds for the rest of it's life.

          Again, this is only the method I use. Others do things differently and the manufacturers have their own theories. There are even some who posit that the break in period does nothing for the accuracy of the rifle and the efficienecy of future cleaning and that it's all an old wives tale. I personally don't believe that but that's just me.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by llkinak View Post
            I then clean after every five for the next 50 and then every six for the next 60 which takes us up to 210. This process usually takes several days based on how the weapons are cleaned.
            I am envious of anyone who can get to the range that much. (Having kids puts a serious crimp into range time!)

            Thanks again - this is quite helpful and a good thing to keep in mind. Most of my rifles are old military, WWI or II, so I've never had the opportunity to break in a barrel and want to make sure mine doesn't fall into that category of barrels that are hurt more by the cleaning than by the shooting.
            "There are only two professions in the world in which the amateur excels the professional. One, military strategy, and, two, prostitution."
            -- Maj. Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower

            (Avatar: Commodore Edwin Ward Moore, Republic of Texas Navy)

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jon Jordan View Post
              I am envious of anyone who can get to the range that much. (Having kids puts a serious crimp into range time!)

              Thanks again - this is quite helpful and a good thing to keep in mind. Most of my rifles are old military, WWI or II, so I've never had the opportunity to break in a barrel and want to make sure mine doesn't fall into that category of barrels that are hurt more by the cleaning than by the shooting.
              Well, getting paid to do it sure helps, but I know what you mean. Range time is always at a premium.

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              • #8
                [QUOTE=llkinak;1498984]Make sure to take care of the optic and any bedding compound by covering them with a rag while cleaning. QUOTE]

                I remember I had been a little careless a couple of times and sprayed gun oil on the scope lens. I called the Scope manufacturer. They said just add a little acetone to a patch and wipe the lens dry. What i noticed was many normal eye glass cleaners also have acetone. I just used that and it seems to have worked fine.
                But the fact is Lance makes a good point it is very easy to get oil and solvents into the scope if you are careless. Always cover the optics.Gun oil may be ok but -solvents that could easily ruin a good scope.

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