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Where are all the Tiger 1's?

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  • Where are all the Tiger 1's?

    Why are there so few Tiger 1's remaining. What is it about 7 now?

  • #2
    A majority of the production was recovered by the Soviets and the Allies in various states of damage and dismantled for scrap metal. A lot of Tigers ended their careers by getting stuck, running out of gas, falling off a bridge and so on, so after the war the wrecks were still fairly intact. The vehicles in the top photo simply rolled into a steep ravine but could not be recovered from such a big hole so they were written off.



    Last edited by MonsterZero; 11 May 10, 03:54.

    "Artillery adds dignity to what would otherwise be a ugly brawl."
    --Frederick II, King of Prussia

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MonsterZero View Post
      The vehicles in the top photo simply rolled into a steep ravine but could not be recovered from such a big hole so they were written off.
      The first photo seems to be photoshopped IMHO. For instance, where is the muzzle brake and the front half the gun on the second tank?

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      • #4
        In addition Many of those units recovered by the allies were shot to crap in Weapons and Armour tests.
        BoRG
        "... and that was the last time they called me Freakboy Moses"

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        • #5
          There must be more that seven Tiger Is left. I can think of several. Bovington(1), Trobruk(1), Russia(At least 2), Aberdeen(1), Private collections(2) =7. There must be many more, perhaps they are on static display and not operational, but there must be more. A quick check shows that 1354 were produced up to wars end.
          Last edited by Obermasterfuher; 11 May 10, 17:04.
          The potentcy of the 88 was that it was present, in reasonable numbers, when it was needed, They had them. We did not.
          Ian Hogg

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          • #6
            There was one at the Auto-Technic Museum in Sinshiem, GE. Not sure if it's still there.
            If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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            • #7
              Six German Tiger I tanks survived World War II and are currently on display in museums or parks.

              Aberdeen Tiger: This Tiger, originally assigned to the German heavy panzer unit s.Pz.Abt. 501, was captured in North Africa in 1943. The panzer was subsequently shipped by the U.S. Army to Aberdeen Proving Grounds for testing and analysis. (See Yank article.) After the war, the Tiger was displayed at Aberdeen for many years. But as of September 2005, this tank is not at Aberdeen, but is in Europe for restoration.

              Bovington Tiger: This Tiger was also captured in North Africa. The Tiger was originally assigned to the German heavy panzer unit s.Pz.Abt. 504 with tactical number 131. After capture, the Tiger was shipped back to England for analysis. This Tiger is being restored to running order by The Tank Museum at Bovington. See http://www.tiger-tank.com/ for a journal of the restoration.

              Saumur Tiger: This late Tiger I was captured in France and is currently on display at Musée des blindés in Saumur, France.

              Vimoutiers Tiger: This Tiger was destroyed near the town of Vimoutiers, France during the German retreat from Normandy. After the war, the tank was largely forgotten and left to rust in a ditch. In the 1970s, the Tiger was moved to a display in the town, slightly patched, and repainted. This Tiger is in poor condition.

              Kubinka Tiger: The Russian tank museum at Kubinka houses a surviving rubber-wheeled Tiger in good condition.

              Snegiri Tiger: Originally used as a target at Russian proving grounds, this heavily damaged Tiger was displayed outdoors at the Lenino-Snegiri Museum of Military History. At one time, the Tiger was apparently moved to a museum in Saratov, Russia.
              Last edited by Mountain Man; 11 May 10, 18:01.
              Quis Custodiet Ipsos Custodes? Who is watching the watchers?

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              • #8
                Here is a list of the surviving Tanks of the Tiger family from the very interesting Alan Hamby site:

                http://www.alanhamby.com/survivors.shtml

                kelt

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mountain Man View Post
                  Six German Tiger I tanks survived World War II and are currently on display in museums or parks.

                  Aberdeen Tiger: This Tiger, originally assigned to the German heavy panzer unit s.Pz.Abt. 501, was captured in North Africa in 1943. The panzer was subsequently shipped by the U.S. Army to Aberdeen Proving Grounds for testing and analysis. (See Yank article.) After the war, the Tiger was displayed at Aberdeen for many years. But as of September 2005, this tank is not at Aberdeen, but is in Europe for restoration.
                  This Tiger also spent time at the museum in Sinshiem. It had parts of the armor cut away to reveal the interior.
                  If you can't set a good example, be a glaring warning.

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                  • #10
                    I read that the one in the movie Band of Brothers and Saving Private Ryan was from a private collection, but after checking it appears to be the Tiger from Saumurs. So that accounts for one I thought was in a private collection.
                    The potentcy of the 88 was that it was present, in reasonable numbers, when it was needed, They had them. We did not.
                    Ian Hogg

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Obermasterfuher View Post
                      I read that the one in the movie Band of Brothers and Saving Private Ryan was from a private collection, but after checking it appears to be the Tiger from Saumurs. So that accounts for one I thought was in a private collection.
                      The "Tiger I" used in movies are props made out from Russian chassis, t34 for band of brothers and T55 for saving private Ryan.

                      The musueums that can display working Tiger 1 & king Tiger are Bovington and Saumur (with several Panther at saumur and spare engines).

                      kelt

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                      • #12
                        You are probably driving a bit of one...

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                        • #13
                          I've been to Aberdeen twice and no Tiger. I have been reading Willy Fey's book and alot of the Tigers were blown up by the crews after being abandoned for breakdowns or combat damage.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Freightshaker View Post
                            This Tiger also spent time at the museum in Sinshiem. It had parts of the armor cut away to reveal the interior.
                            The Tiger II at the Patton Museum has a large cut-away as well.
                            "You listen to the ol' Pork Chop Express on a dark and stormy night......"

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                            • #15
                              I found this on another site.

                              Bovington Tank Museum Hull number 250112
                              Vimoutiers Hull number 251113
                              Saumur Tank Museum Hull number 251114
                              Kubinka Tank Museum Hull number 250427
                              Military Historical Museum, Lenino-Snegiri Hull number 251227
                              Aberdeen U.S. Army Ordnance Museum This tank was on loan to Germany (Sinsheim Auto + Technik Museum, Panzermuseum Munster)
                              and is currently under restoration in UK (Kevin Wheatcroft collection
                              In this world nothing is certain but death and taxes
                              - Benjamin Franklin, U.S. statesman, author, and scientist

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