Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Favorite submachine gun of ww2

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Favorite submachine gun of ww2

    During the second world war the submachine gun was used by most armies.

    German
    MP-40
    MP-38
    MP-44 (Assault Rifle)

    American
    thompson M1
    Thompson m1928
    Reising submachine gun
    M3 grease gun

    Soviet
    PPSH-41

    British
    Sten

    Which was your favorite in each catoragory.
    Peter Williams

    "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

    Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

  • #2
    I would tend to say that the outstanding smg of the war was probably the ppsh-41, followed by the thompson.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thats quite a big differnce the Thompson used a 20 or thiry round maginzine. The PPSH-41 used a 74 round magizine. But that is a good opinion!!
      Peter Williams

      "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

      Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

      Comment


      • #4
        M3 Grease gun

        I carried one when I was a 2LT for some big butt-kickin' firepower. It's far easier to maintain and puts out slugs like nobody's business
        Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
        Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


        "Never pet a burning dog."

        RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
        http://www.mormon.org
        http://www.sca.org
        http://www.scv.org/
        http://www.scouting.org/

        Comment


        • #5
          I fired the M3 grease gun and it was a great weapon. I wish the army still had it in their possession.
          VonMoltke

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Janos
            M3 Grease gun

            I carried one when I was a 2LT for some big butt-kickin' firepower. It's far easier to maintain and puts out slugs like nobody's business
            Was that standard issue or something? I.E. could you choose to have one issued to you if you wanted one? Or was it your own? In fact, is there a rule on carrying your own personal weapons? Just wondering...

            Dr. S.
            Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

            www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

            www.tabletown.co.uk

            Comment


            • #7
              Fav SMG

              My uncle served with Canadian Forces in Italy, Normandy, and Northern Europe. Was issued the Thompson, really liked it a lot - but was maintenance intensive. Also got issued Sten. Hated it. Swapped it for MP40 whenever he could find one.

              Thought MP40 was near perfect for SMG.

              Comment


              • #8
                The MP40 was probably the most successful SMG of WW II. It pioneered the use of stamped metal pieces. It could be mass produced, was inexpensive to make and was reliable.

                It fired at a cyclic rate that made it managable in automatic fire and with its 32 round box magazine it was a good compromise of weight to ammo capacity.

                When obtained by the allies it was often used to replace available allied designs. Probably the greatest compliment given it were the number of imitators it spawned. The idea of a cheap, stamped metal SMG became almost a universal concept.

                With all that being said, if I had to pick a SMG for personal use I'd go with the M3 "grease gun", one of the MP40 imitators, for the increased stopping power of its .45ACP round.
                Lance W.

                Peace through superior firepower.

                Comment


                • #9
                  THE MP-40

                  THe MP-40 would be my choice as well for a German submachine gun. Thirty Two rounds was a lot of lead. These weapons were issued to NCOs and to infantry and panzer greniders.
                  Peter Williams

                  "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

                  Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I voted PPSH-41.

                    It had a large capacity drum; ease of assembly, simple to use, reliable, cheap. And you can field a huge amount of them into untrained hands. The Germans often gave up the MP-38/40 in favour of the PPSH.

                    Cheers!



                    Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                    "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                    What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: I voted PPSH-41.

                      Originally posted by RStory
                      It had a large capacity drum; ease of assembly, simple to use, reliable, cheap. And you can field a huge amount of them into untrained hands. The Germans often gave up the MP-38/40 in favour of the PPSH.

                      Cheers!



                      The PPSh41 had a high ammo capacity, but the stopping power of its cartridge would not be enough for my tastes. Its 7.62mm round (despite it relatively high muzzle velocity) just wasn't big enough when compared to either the MP40's 9mm or the Thompson or M3 greasegun's .45ACP.
                      Lance W.

                      Peace through superior firepower.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Re: I voted PPSH-41.

                        Originally posted by Lance Williams
                        The PPSh41 had a high ammo capacity, but the stopping power of its cartridge would not be enough for my tastes. Its 7.62mm round (despite it relatively high muzzle velocity) just wasn't big enough when compared to either the MP40's 9mm or the Thompson or M3 greasegun's .45ACP.
                        True, but when you're being over-run by a company carrying PPSH-41; does it really matter if the first hit doesn't kill you?

                        Cheers!


                        Last edited by RichardS; 12 Feb 05, 11:50.
                        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

                        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

                        What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There is an excellent SMG you have neglected to list. The Owens which was designed and manufactured in Australia.

                          It was made from stamped steel and it most unique feature was its top mounted magazine. The location of the magazine had the aid of gravity to make its operation very reliable. In that regard it was simular to the Bren Machine gun.

                          It looked a little odd, but it was very effective.
                          Lance W.

                          Peace through superior firepower.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            tahnks lace

                            Thank you Lance, I sorry but I did not kow of a Owens SMG. Thanks for the great infomation.
                            Peter Williams

                            "We're not lost private, we're in Normandy"-

                            Lt. Richard Winters 101st 506 pir

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thompson SMG - durable, good stopping power, easy to operate, good in all environments. what more could you ask for?
                              Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                              (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X