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Bren gun, still about in the 90's?!

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  • Bren gun, still about in the 90's?!

    On another forum someone mentioned the Bren stayed in service until the late 90's. So I fed bren into google and got this.

    While it is best known for its role as the British and Commonwealth forces' primary infantry light machine gun (LMG) in World War II, it was also used in the Korean War and saw service throughout the later half of the 20th century including the Falklands War and the 1991 Gulf War.
    Now I suspect that's rubbish of the highest order. But the odd weapon does turn up in the armed forces inventory, such as the M-60D's the Crabs use.

    So anyone got any further details? Has anyone got any mention of the Bren in British use after the 60's?
    Winnie says
    ---------------------------------
    "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

    It was an Accident."
    Herr Flick.

  • #2
    I fired Bren guns on the range at RAF Benson in the mid to late 80's. We had to check them out of the armoury along with .22 rifles (Martini Action), .303's and A1L1 SLRs. There were plenty in there so I guess the RAF still had them at least!

    Wolster

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    • #3
      it was around in the early 90`s with TA units it was known as the L4A2 LMG it was used by the royal marines and other units in the falklands war and in the gulf war 91 ... a very accurate weapon too ..
      owner of the yahoo group for WW1 ,WW2 and Modern TO&Es
      (Tables of organisation & equipment or Unit of action )

      http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOandEs/

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      • #4
        The Bren was rechambered to fire 7.62mm bullets when that calibre was selected as NATO standard. I gathered that it was still considered operational (limited) but basically used as a training gun for the TA, etc. I guess a few are still around today.
        Eagles may fly; but weasels aren't sucked into jet engines!

        "I'm not expendable; I'm not stupid and I'm not going." - Kerr Avon, Blake's 7

        What didn't kill us; didn't make us smarter.

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        • #5
          forgot to mention i fired the bren LMG when i was TA in 92 ..

          couple of links on it ..

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bren

          http://www.britains-smallwars.com/Fa...apons.htm#bren

          http://www.militaryfactory.com/small...allarms_id=220
          To this day, many still swear by the reliability and fire power available through the Bren system, even as the L86 LSW (detailed elsewhere on this site) of 5.56mm blend takes to the stage with the British Army. The Indian Army produced it's own Bren through Ishapur based on .303 Mk 3 conversion models, all accepting the 7.62x51mm round and designated as the "IA".

          Bren Gun, 7.62mm Series variants are as follows:

          L4A1 - Mk 3 Bren Gun conversion of .303 model, modified to fire the 7.62mm NATO-standard cartridge; appearing in 1957.
          L4A2 - Mk 3 Bren Gun conversions appearing from 1959-1961; engineering and production changes as necessitated.
          L4A3 - Variant of the L4A2 issued with a chrome-bore barrel; limited production.
          L4A4 - Standard Bren 7.62mm Army series; supplied with chromium-lined spare barrel; some converted from Mk 2 marks but limited while Mk 3 conversions were more common.
          L4A5 - Navy-approved variant; converted from .303 Mk 2 models; appearing in April of 1960.
          L4A6 - Modified L4A1 model to accept "perfected" L4A1 magazine over the L3A2 magazine; redesigned chrome-bore barrel; appearing in November of 1960.
          IA - Indian Army conversions of the .303 Mk 3 Bren Gun.
          owner of the yahoo group for WW1 ,WW2 and Modern TO&Es
          (Tables of organisation & equipment or Unit of action )

          http://games.groups.yahoo.com/group/TOandEs/

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          • #6
            Ta muchly all of you.
            Winnie says
            ---------------------------------
            "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

            It was an Accident."
            Herr Flick.

            Comment


            • #7
              The irony is that the L86 LSW has already come and gone, barely being in service for a tiny fraction of the time the Bren was in service. Today, I will probably take the Bren over the L86 LSW.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ogukuo72 View Post
                The irony is that the L86 LSW has already come and gone, barely being in service for a tiny fraction of the time the Bren was in service. Today, I will probably take the Bren over the L86 LSW.
                Eh what? The L86 is still in service, and it's a darn sight better than a Bren (No scope on a bren).

                Compare the two.
                Same sized magazine, both insanely accurate, both are reliable, both have a built in bi-pod, both can't be fired by left handed users and they both have almost identical barrel length (26" for the L86 DMR, 25" for the Bren).

                Advantages to the L-86; scope and more compact size.
                Winnie says
                ---------------------------------
                "He fell out of a Gestapo car, over a bridge, and onto a railway line. Then was run over by the Berlin Express.

                It was an Accident."
                Herr Flick.

                Comment

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