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  • You can't get any bigger than this!





    http://www.5ad.org/gun.htm

    The largest gun ever built was the "Gustav Gun" built in Essen, Germany in 1941 by the firm of Friedrich Krupp A.G. Upholding a tradition of naming heavy cannon after family members, the Gustav Gun was named after the invalid head of the Krupp family - Gustav Krupp von Bohlen und Halbach. The strategic weapon of its day, the Gustav Gun was built at the direct order of Adolf Hitler for the express purpose of crushing Maginot Line forts protecting the French frontier. To accomplish this, Krupp designed a giant railway gun weighing 1344 tons with a bore diameter of 800 mm (31.5") and served by a 500 man crew commanded by a major-general.

    Two types of projectiles were fired using a 3000lb. charge of smokeless powder: a 10,584 lb. high explosive (HE) shell and a 16,540 lb. concrete-piercing projectile. Craters from the HE shells measured 30-ft. wide and 30-ft. deep while the concrete piercing projectile proved capable of penetrating 264-ft. of reinforced concrete before exploding! Maximum range was 23 miles with HE shells and 29 miles with concrete piercing projectiles. Muzzle velocity was approximately 2700 f.p.s.


    This is just unreal! Look at the size of that thing! The article says it was used against the Warsaw Ghetto! Poor bastards...

  • #2
    Originally posted by Desert Eagle




    http://www.5ad.org/gun.htm




    This is just unreal! Look at the size of that thing! The article says it was used against the Warsaw Ghetto! Poor bastards...
    Yes it's realy hard to work out how they lost the war

    Hitler was such a dipshit
    Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Temujin
      Yes it's realy hard to work out how they lost the war

      Hitler was such a dipshit
      Agreed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Wow that is one big gun. Does anyone know were else this gun was used if it was at all. And does anyone know what happen to it?

        Also I guess the Germans never used it on the Maginot Line since the Germans just went around it the Brussels and Belgium.

        Thanks for looking!!

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        • #5
          One of the guns was destroyed by the Germans to avoid capture. Another was captured by US troops and latter dismantled for scrap. A third was found incomplete in a factory, also scraped.

          Here's more info:

          http://www.aopt91.dsl.pipex.com/rail...ra%20index.htm


          Accordingly the 80-cm K (E) trundled to the Crimea on specially re-laid track. Well ahead of its progress a small army of labourers started to prepare the gun's chosen firing position at Bakhchisaray, a small village outside Sevastopol. Well over 1, 500 men under the control of a German army engineer unit dug through a small knoll to form a wide railway cutting on an arc of double track, and the sides of the cutting were raised to provide cover and protection for the gun. On the approaches railway troops laboured to re-lay track and strengthen possible trouble points against the passing of the 'schwere Gustav'. Work on the eventual firing site reached the point where the area behind the curve of firing tracks resembled a small marshalling yard over 1. 2 km (0. 75 miles) long. it resembled a marshalling yard, and that was exactly what it was. In the area the 25 separate loads that formed the gun and its carriage had to be assembled and pushed and pulled into the right position and order. Farther to the rear were the accommodation areas where the numerous men of the gun crew lived and prepared for their task


          The manpower involved in assembling 'Schwere Gustav' was large, Each of the 80-cm K (E)s had a complete detachment of no less than 1,420 men under the command of a full colonel. He had his own headquarters and planning staff, and there was the main gun crew which numbered about 500, most of whom were involved with the complicated ammunition care and handling. Once in action these 500 would remain with the gun, but the rest of the gun's manpower was made up from various units including an intelligence section to determine what targets to engage. Quite a number of troops were involved in the two light anti-aircraft defence battalions that always accompanied the gun when it travelled and also supplied manpower for some assembly tasks. Once the gun was in position these AA battalions warded off unwanted aerial intruders. Two guard companies constantly patrolled the perimeter of the gun position (at one time these companies were Romanian), and at all times there was a small group of civilian technicians from Krupp who dealt with the technical aspects of their monster charge and advised the soldiers. Railway troops and the usual administrative personnel added to the manpower total.

          Even using this small army of men it took between three and six weeks to assemble the gun...
          'Schwere Gustav' was in action again on 6 June, initially against Fort Molotov. Seven shells demolished that structure and then it was the turn of a target known as the White Cliff, This was the aiming point for an underground ammunition magazine under Severnaya Bay and so placed by the Sviets as to be invulnerable to conventional weapons. It was not invulnerable to the 80-cm K (E) for nine projectiles bored the way down through the sea, through over 30 m (100 ft) of sea bottom and then exploded inside the magazine. By the time 'schwere Gustav' had fired its ninth shot the magazine was a wreck and to cap it all a small sailing ship had been sunk in the process.
          Last edited by Desert Eagle; 21 Apr 04, 16:20.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Temujin
            Yes it's realy hard to work out how they lost the war

            Hitler was such a dipshit
            What do you mean? Were those guns not useful or worthwhile? Would e.g. Sevastopol have been taken without them? The Germans used them in WWI, so obviously they knew what they could do, and found them worth the effort.

            Yeah I'm a little touchy there, as my name indicates

            Edit: And here is Gustav's chubby pal from WWI
            Last edited by Dicke Bertha; 09 May 04, 05:25.
            "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
            "Hey, you just made that rule up."


            Heil Dicke Bertha!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Dicke Bertha
              What do you mean? Were those guns not useful or worthwhile? Would e.g. Sevastopol have been taken without them? The Germans used them in WWI, so obviously they knew what they could do, and found them worth the effort.

              Yeah I'm a little touchy there, as my name indicates
              Im sure when they could be used they were devastating, but WW2 was a mobile war with many fronts for the Germans, look at the resources used and the workers etc used in the production and use of these things. Would sevastapol be taken if the energy to build those canons was put into dive bombers? These could be used at Sevastapol then redirected immediately to another front in a matter of days.
              Not lip service, nor obsequious homage to superiors, nor servile observance of forms and customs...the Australian army is proof that individualism is the best and not the worst foundation upon which to build up collective discipline - General Monash

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Temujin
                Hitler was such a dipshit
                By the looks of the pictures, he may have just been 'compensating'

                Comment


                • #9
                  I remember a few years ago seeing a 1/72 scale model of that thing in a hobby shop I frequent, still quite huge (in comparison to other 1/72 armour models anyways). Too bad I didn't have enough to buy it, it would have been fun getting and building it then using it to bombard my 1/72 scale US and British figurines.

                  Here's hoping that the next Combat Mission to come out will feature this beast.
                  -----------------------------------
                  Sings we a song of wolves.
                  Who smells fear and slays the coward.
                  Sings we a song of man.
                  Who smells gold and slays his brother
                  .

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                  • #10
                    Here's another big gun.
                    http://www.astronautix.com/lvs/babongun.htm

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      There is a Modern Marvels episode that covers these. They were very usefull in WWI. When first used against Paris the French had absolutly no idea they were being shelled at first.

                      The Gustav's did suffer from problems with the barel, mainly flexing. Also the shells they were firing were reaching sub-orbit the highest altitude by a manmade object up to the V2 rockets. Its amazing they actually worked due to the scale they were built on.

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                      • #12
                        IMHO by WWII siege guns had pretty much outlived thier usefulness.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Temujin
                          Im sure when they could be used they were devastating, but WW2 was a mobile war with many fronts for the Germans, look at the resources used and the workers etc used in the production and use of these things. Would sevastapol be taken if the energy to build those canons was put into dive bombers? These could be used at Sevastapol then redirected immediately to another front in a matter of days.
                          WW2 a mobile war? Yes at times. And no, at times it was trench warfare, sieges, static bombardments.

                          The economic aspects of building those monsters, well they perhaps (wild speculation) were the equivalents of some Stuka divisions. They were able to deliver blows far beyond the capacity of the mosquito stukas. Or are you saying skip all expensive weapon systems and let's put everything into the infantry...

                          Seems not so stupid to have a diverse bouquet of weapons .
                          "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                          "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                          Heil Dicke Bertha!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Prester John
                            Cool.

                            This I took from the link:

                            "In March of 1988, Bull received a contract to build two full sized 'Project Babylon' 1000 mm superguns and one 'Baby Babylon' 350 mm prototype for a total of $25 million. "

                            So they aren't that expensive are they. What's that, a couple of jet fighters' worth?
                            "You can't change the rules in the middle of the game."
                            "Hey, you just made that rule up."


                            Heil Dicke Bertha!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Dicke Bertha
                              Cool.

                              This I took from the link:

                              "In March of 1988, Bull received a contract to build two full sized 'Project Babylon' 1000 mm superguns and one 'Baby Babylon' 350 mm prototype for a total of $25 million. "

                              So they aren't that expensive are they. What's that, a couple of jet fighters' worth?

                              At today's prices?
                              1 1/2 F-16s maybe; but it barely begins to cover the cost of a Raptor.
                              Scientists have announced they've discovered a cure for apathy. However no one has shown the slightest bit of interest !!

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