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  • well thier both webely's and is the first one a Mk VI

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    • Originally posted by tanker55
      well thier both webely's and is the first one a Mk VI
      they are both webleys and both photos are of the same gun
      this one is a Mk VI notice the difference
      Attached Files
      Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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      • whats the big deal then if there both the same? i think the second one dosent break at the top

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        • first two images same gun and 3rd image is webley Mk VI
          Try opening them all together look at the cylinder and handgrip
          Last edited by Druid_Ian; 29 May 06, 20:18.
          Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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          • still dont know it the first two pics are different from the third are they all Mk VI's

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            • Originally posted by tanker55
              still dont know it the first two pics are different from the third are they all Mk VI's
              I can definitely say first two are not repeat not Mk VI's
              look at the shape and pattern on the cylinder
              also what is that lever for on the handgrip
              Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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              • Combined photo of Guns
                Attached Files
                Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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                • It's a Webley Mk-IV with a de-cocker. The switch catches the grooves and lowers the hammer without firing the gun.
                  "Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl." - Frederick the Great

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                  • Originally posted by frisco17
                    It's a Webley Mk-IV with a de-cocker. The switch catches the grooves and lowers the hammer without firing the gun.
                    Its even stranger than that
                    big clue here its not a Webley-scott model but its a Webley-something
                    Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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                    • The solution to the mystery revolver

                      The Webley-Fosbery opens, empties, and loads in exactly the same manner as all other contemporary Webley revolvers. Pressing on a pivoting lever on the side of its upper receiver releases its barrel-and-cylinder assembly, which then tilts up and forward ("breaks open") on a bottom-front pivot, and simultaneously ejects from all six cylinder chambers at once. After loading, the barrel-and-cylinder assembly is tilted back into firing position, and it automatically locks itself closed. The frame of the Webley-Fosbery is divided into two parts: the upper "receiver," which includes the pistol's barrel, cylinder, hammer mechanism, and opening latch; and the lower "frame," which includes its trigger mechanism, safety lever, and handle. The trigger is single-action, but only in the same sense that the Colt Government Model's is, because the Webley-Fosbery is a kind of semi-automatic pistol.

                      Once this pistol is loaded, it is cocked by pushing its entire upper "receiver" section all the way to the rear of its lower "frame" section. The upper receiver is then returned to battery by the pressure of a spring in the frame.

                      When the receiver is moved rearward in its frame -- by the recoil of a just-fired cartridge, for instance -- a cam pin fixed in the frame rides in zig-zag slots in the outer surface of the pistol's cylinder, and the cylinder is revolved half-way toward the next chamber. While this is going on, the pistol's hammer is being cocked as well. As the frame-mounted spring returns the receiver forward into battery, the cam pin forces the cylinder to revolve the rest of the way, and the weapon is ready to fire its next shot.

                      It does not do, after loading, to merely manually cock this gun's hammer. That's because there is no way to be absolutely sure, as the barrel-and-cylinder assembly is being closed, that one of the cylinder's chambers is properly lined up with the barrel. Also, the Webley-Fosbery's hammer has absolutely nothing to do with rotating its cylinder. Thus the Webley-Fosbery "Automatic Revolver" is meant to be loaded, push-cocked, and then carried at full cock, ready to fire. That's why this peculiar single-action revolver has a safety-catch on the left side of its frame, and needs it.
                      I said it was an unusual one
                      Confucius he say, war not determine who's right. War determine who's left

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                        • Thats a Walther WA-2000 Police Marksman rifle.

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                          • correct although ive never seen police use that rifle.

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                              • Originally posted by tanker55
                                correct although ive never seen police use that rifle.
                                It actually was developed back in the 70s as a police sniper rifle. I dont think that more than hundred rifles or so ever was produced, and its probably quite rare. Probably was too expensive to have made it on the open-market.
                                "The secret of war lies in the communications" - Napoleon Bonaparte

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