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Question on KGV twin mount firing practices.

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  • Question on KGV twin mount firing practices.

    As I understand it, the KGV main guns were mounted in pairs in the quadruple turrets. My question is, did they fire the pair at the same time (because they're going to recoil anyway) or one then the other (to save strain on the recoil mechanism)?
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  • #2
    AFAIK they generally fired broadsides, but all guns in one turret fired at slightly different times (milliseconds) to prevent interference in the air and the dispersion resulting from said interference.

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    • #3
      I found a video of what I believe is a KGV class (don't know which one) firing it's "A" (forward) quad turret, and I can't discern if it's firing 2 only or 4.

      Someone else may be able to clarify.

      Guns fire @56sec and again at the end.

      I can't discern from the gun flash, only from the amount of gun tube recoil, but it seems there is a (very) slight time difference.



      Full screen available here:

      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xsp0Mr5Lcl8
      Last edited by At ease; 12 Dec 12, 01:05.
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      • #4
        Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
        As I understand it, the KGV main guns were mounted in pairs in the quadruple turrets. My question is, did they fire the pair at the same time (because they're going to recoil anyway) or one then the other (to save strain on the recoil mechanism)?
        This is wrong. All four are independently mounted in the turret. As far as firing, I'd assume they were fired either individually or in pairs depending on what sort of salvo pattern is required. The pictures below demonstrate this.
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          In that first pic, what are those things on top of the turret? There's another one near the bow. Some kind of launchers.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
            This is wrong. All four are independently mounted in the turret. As far as firing, I'd assume they were fired either individually or in pairs depending on what sort of salvo pattern is required. The pictures below demonstrate this.
            Thanks. Appears I have some bad information.
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            • #7
              Originally posted by phil74501 View Post
              In that first pic, what are those things on top of the turret? There's another one near the bow. Some kind of launchers.
              Those are the short lived UP projectors. These launched 3" rockets Mk 4 and 6 that carried a cable intended to act much like barrage balloons. These were replaced by more senciable things like real AA guns.... And, that's the stern not the bow....

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              • #8
                Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                This is wrong. All four are independently mounted in the turret. As far as firing, I'd assume they were fired either individually or in pairs depending on what sort of salvo pattern is required. The pictures below demonstrate this.
                Hi

                The guns were fired either in pairs or singularly. However in the pair firings, the two guns being fired were never the ones next to each other. Thus if the four were noted as A B C D, you would fire A&D together, A&C, or B&D. and never A&B, B&C or C&D, for the reasons noted earlier. However I imagine that in a needs must scenario, that such 'polite' rules may well have been infringed

                More general info on the guns here:-
                http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNBR_14-45_mk7.htm

                Regards
                "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." Churchill

                "I'm no reactionary.Christ on the Mountain! I'm as idealistic as Hell" Eisenhower

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by T. A. Gardner View Post
                  Those are the short lived UP projectors. These launched 3" rockets Mk 4 and 6 that carried a cable intended to act much like barrage balloons. These were replaced by more senciable things like real AA guns.... And, that's the stern not the bow....
                  The UP's were a stop gap device for the shortage of decent AA guns.
                  One of the many theories about what caused HMS Hood to blow up and sink has surrounded a shell igniting the UP ammunition store.

                  HMS Hood was to be fitted with 5 such projectors in 1940
                  http://www.hmshood.org.uk/reference/...adm1-23040.htm
                  Also below is the document listing the removal of the UP's from RN ships in 1941 after the Hood incident
                  http://www.hmshood.org.uk/reference/...adm1-11585.htm

                  Regards
                  Last edited by Andy H; 14 Dec 12, 09:33.
                  "You have enemies? Good. That means you've stood up for something, sometime in your life." Churchill

                  "I'm no reactionary.Christ on the Mountain! I'm as idealistic as Hell" Eisenhower

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                  • #10
                    Opana, you're thinking ...

                    Originally posted by OpanaPointer View Post
                    As I understand it, the KGV main guns were mounted in pairs in the quadruple turrets. My question is, did they fire the pair at the same time (because they're going to recoil anyway) or one then the other (to save strain on the recoil mechanism)?
                    ... of the French Dunkerques and Richelieus. Unlike the beamier KGVs, the French 4 gun main turrets were split into 2 halves internally to save on weight in mounts and loading arrangements. French gun breechblocks were unique in that they opened upwards to facilitate loading in tight quarters. They did in fact also fire by pairs simultaneously, which did indeed cause some shell dispersion.

                    You can see how they're paired up in these photos of Dunkerque, looking forward, and aft:
                    Last edited by Marmat; 15 Apr 18, 13:17.
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                    • #11
                      Danke! Probably where I got my misinformation from.
                      Hyperwar: World War II on the World Wide Web
                      Hyperwar, Whats New
                      World War II Resources
                      The best place in the world to "work".

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