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Modern U.S. Military Revolvers?

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  • Modern U.S. Military Revolvers?

    Are there still any revolvers in use by the U.S. military?
    "The Bangalore Torpedo was 50' long and packed with 85 pounds of TNT and you assembled it along the way. By hand. I'd love to meet the ******* who invented it."

  • #2
    Not that I am aware of.

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    • #3
      A former Fort Richardson MP who worked as a game warden told me they used to draw S&W Model 29s when they were doing stuff in the woods. Of course that was 20 years ago now, so I don't know if they're still in inventory.
      Last edited by llkinak; 02 Nov 12, 11:31.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by llkinak View Post
        A former Fort Richardson MP who worked as a game warden told me they used to draw S&W Model 29s when they were doing stuff in the woods.
        That reminded me of the Danish Navy's Sirius Sledge Patrol in Greenland. Their 5.56mm rifles and 9mm pistols just didn't cut it with polar bears. They are now issued M1917 Enfields in 30/06 and Glock 20's in 10mm.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sl%C3%A6depatruljen_Sirius

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        • #5
          I doubt revolvers are in use outside of Special Operations.

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          • #6
            i've heard us soldiers in iraq, afghanistan, carring pistols in other calibers, because lack of reliability of beretta M-9. .45's, .40's being the calibers choosen. but i think a revolver can't be a weapon of choice nowadays, because of low capacity (there are 8 shot .357, but in a .44 mag frame), and more likely to get dirt on it's mechanism. can anyone answer this? what's the last military revolver in active service? i think it's the british enfield .380. what do you think?

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            • #7
              I know that there are non in current use in the marine corps, pretty sure the other branches dumped them a long time ago also.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kurt tank 152 View Post
                but i think a revolver can't be a weapon of choice nowadays, because of low capacity (there are 8 shot .357, but in a .44 mag frame), and more likely to get dirt on it's mechanism.
                Revolvers are actually generally held to be more reliable and resistant to environmental factors than semi-automatic pistols. They persisted in many elite units in the 1980s at least and continue to be part of arsenals of police and private security companies in the United States for instance. The US military has all but ditched them, but the debate about what sidearm is better often devolves into whether there is much broad military utility to sidearms in general.

                Also, its worth noting, that in the US military, National Stock Numbers, the inventory code for all items that are physically possessed by the DoD or its subordinate entities, has dozens of active NSNs for revolvers. Some of these are surely with elements of the services that engage in competition shooting, such as the Army Marksmanship Unit; civilian law enforcement elements, and possibly private security contractors issued weapons by the DoD or its subordinate entities. Others, however, are also likely just sitting armories awaiting final divestment.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by thatguy96 View Post
                  Revolvers are actually generally held to be more reliable and resistant to environmental factors than semi-automatic pistols.
                  Not anymore.

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                  • #10
                    After the Mk23s were pulled from NSW units, 686s were put back into service. Whether this is still the case, I'm not sure, as the HK45CT has come online within the last year or so.

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                    • #11
                      They don't use the Mk23 anymore?
                      "The Bangalore Torpedo was 50' long and packed with 85 pounds of TNT and you assembled it along the way. By hand. I'd love to meet the ******* who invented it."

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                      • #12
                        Not really in any numbers. The SDV teams held onto theirs the longest. There might be a few around, but after the turn-in of the bulk of them, NSW stopped receiving .45 ACP. That was a few years ago. The insane part is that they actually purchased new 686s to replace them, and a few short years later, the Mk24s were ordered and deployed. I've heard of a few Mk23s being seen here and there, but they've been pretty rare to see, given the lack of availability of ammo. And now that ammo is available, everything the Mk23 did can be done by the Mk24 in a smaller package.

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