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  • Gun care questions

    For the gun experts.

    1)Is there a need to oil the metal surfaces that are in contact with the wooden stock(or those surfaces that are not accessible when the stock is attached). I usually never remove the stock but oil all the metal surfaces that are exposed and accesible only(including the bore and the mechanism). I have some mannlichher style stocks where the barrel is almost completely inaccessible unless the stock is completely taken out.

    2) What care is required for the wooden stock ? What products are recommended for stock care ?

    Thanks.

  • #2
    I was just careful with how much lube I used.

    Example: M1 rifle was usually cleaned and oiled after removing stock but sporterized K98 never had the stock removed. Both rifles retained about 98% of original finish with the exception of slight discoloration at the top of fore ends.

    Kind of a nice patina in my opinion but I never minded a scratch or two either. I noticed as much discoloration around handgrip from the dirt, oil, and other crap on my hands.
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    • #3
      Most don't but it all depends on the value of the firearm and the amount of work you want to put into it. I personally don't disassemble like that.... but I have on occasion. It certainly can't hurt if you do it right. What I mean by that is do you have a gunsmith screwdriver set? Otherwise... you'll likely bugger up the screw head and damage the look of the rifle. Also... don't over oil... oil attracts dirt and moisture which will cause more harm then good. When I oil I let it sit for a few hours to penetrate the surface and then wipe the oil off, that will leave a very fine coat of oil that will protect the metal surface from rust for a long time.
      My worst jump story:
      My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
      As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
      No lie.

      ~
      "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
      -2 Commando Jumpmaster

      Comment


      • #4
        For the gun experts.
        Well, I'll give it a shot anyhow.

        1)Is there a need to oil the metal surfaces that are in contact with the wooden stock(or those surfaces that are not accessible when the stock is attached). I usually never remove the stock but oil all the metal surfaces that are exposed and accesible only(including the bore and the mechanism). I have some mannlichher style stocks where the barrel is almost completely inaccessible unless the stock is completely taken out.
        Yes, they need to be maintained, especially in wet environments. I've lost track of how many barrelled actions I've pulled out of wood stocks in Alaska and seen a great deal of rust in the barrel channel area. The rest of the rifle was in great shape, but the "unobserved" parts were a disaster. Wood holds moisture quite well, and those portions which contact it need regular attention.

        2) What care is required for the wooden stock ? What products are recommended for stock care ?
        Quite a bit depends on the stock. Most are finished pretty well, but even the laminates can warp or have problems if the finish is dug through or the barrel channel has been improperly rasped, for example. If you have a spot where the finish is gone one can usually repair it with the same finish which was originally on the stock. However, it might not match perfectly unless you do the whole thing, it depends how much work you want to put into it.

        I've become a believer in things like Tru-Oil, Lin-Speed and Pilkington for average, everyday stocks. Steel wool, rags, sponges, and fine grit sand paper are also commons tools. Very nice stocks I send to a professional to work on since I'm not really good enough to trust myself yet. Bedding a barrel channel and action on a Model 700 is one thing, working on a nice Griffin and Howe is a whole other ball of wax and requires skills beyond what I've got.

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        • #5
          Over the years I dealt with these guys.... they should have all your needs.

          http://www.brownells.com/
          My worst jump story:
          My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
          As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
          No lie.

          ~
          "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
          -2 Commando Jumpmaster

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
            Most don't but it all depends on the value of the firearm and the amount of work you want to put into it. I personally don't disassemble like that.... but I have on occasion. It certainly can't hurt if you do it right. What I mean by that is do you have a gunsmith screwdriver set? Otherwise... you'll likely bugger up the screw head and damage the look of the rifle. Also... don't over oil... oil attracts dirt and moisture which will cause more harm then good. When I oil I let it sit for a few hours to penetrate the surface and then wipe the oil off, that will leave a very fine coat of oil that will protect the metal surface from rust for a long time.


            Yes that was one of the main reasons for the question, I am afraid to mess something up by removing the stock. I am very particular about proper cleaning and oiling but just never fooled with the stock. I do have a Wheeler Engineering 89 piece gunsmithing kit.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by llkinak View Post
              Well, I'll give it a shot anyhow.


              Yes, they need to be maintained, especially in wet environments. I've lost track of how many barrelled actions I've pulled out of wood stocks in Alaska and seen a great deal of rust in the barrel channel area. The rest of the rifle was in great shape, but the "unobserved" parts were a disaster. Wood holds moisture quite well, and those portions which contact it need regular attention.


              .


              Is it a fairly intricate operation to reinstall stocks. My gun care skills are restricted to routine maintainance(clean and oil), scope mounting and zeroing and reloading. I have never fooled with more complex tasks except in some of the more modular and easy to disassemble firearms like ARs, auto pistols and my Sako TRG-22 which are fairly straightforward.

              Most of my wood stocked guns are the Rem model 700 BDLs and CZs. The only really expensive gun I have is a 1937 Win Model 70 .375H&H and for the latter the stock has never been taken out probably since date of manufacture but has otherwise been very well cared for..
              Last edited by Slim; 11 Sep 12, 03:47.

              Comment


              • #8
                When all else fails there is YouTube.



                The manual for the Remington 700 is also on-line.
                My worst jump story:
                My 13th jump was on the 13th day of the month, aircraft number 013.
                As recorded on my DA Form 1307 Individual Jump Log.
                No lie.

                ~
                "Everything looks all right. Have a good jump, eh."
                -2 Commando Jumpmaster

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by 101combatvet View Post
                  Over the years I dealt with these guys.... they should have all your needs.

                  http://www.brownells.com/
                  Definitely a good company but a screwdriver of the right size can be purchased many places, and for far less than $70 to $130 a set. I understand the importance of correctly sizing a screwdriver to a screw but overpriced tools do nothing to help the man enjoy his hobby.
                  John

                  Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I think the thing to remember is what is the damaging element. Water (of course.) Where does it go and what does it do? Water can get through finished wood with long exposure, best example-the water glass left on the dining room table. Extra durable finishes, like those used on boats and some furniture, can be much more resistant to humidity. The inside of a stock and screw holes, the butt, the forend, sling ring holes, all may let in moisture if they are not perfect fits. Moisture has its tricks to get everywhere. It is not hard to get spar varnish on a brush and put a few coats on any surfaces you feel need it. Moisture will swell the stock excessively and uneven absorption of water causes warpage.

                    Moisture on the metal can cause rust, of course. The bluing on your gun is an oxidation to prevent the oxidation of rust. The bluing can be removed on a gun with just a little use for a number of reason. It never hurts to give a metal surface a light going over on all parts of the gun. Choice of the oil type varies from shooter to shooter-I always liked silicone cloths. I've always thought the shooting industry should come out with their equivelant of the antiseptic cleaning wipes that come in those flip open plastic tubes but with oil wipes (I use the word oil to mean any common rust inhibitor.) Good tools can be found all over, box stores, automotive stores, woodworking stores and flea markets.
                    John

                    Play La Marseillaise. Play it!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Slim View Post
                      For the gun experts.

                      1)Is there a need to oil the metal surfaces that are in contact with the wooden stock(or those surfaces that are not accessible when the stock is attached). I usually never remove the stock but oil all the metal surfaces that are exposed and accesible only(including the bore and the mechanism). I have some mannlichher style stocks where the barrel is almost completely inaccessible unless the stock is completely taken out.

                      2) What care is required for the wooden stock ? What products are recommended for stock care ?

                      Thanks.
                      I would say it depends on the circumstances?
                      If you have had the gun out in the rain maybe. If you have dropped it in a lake definetly.

                      Other than that probably not. Give the gun a thorough strip on purchase, at the start and end of the hunting season if it's used for that and other then that ignore it and stick to a normal strip and clean.
                      "Sometimes its better to light a flamethrower than to curse the darkness" T Pratchett

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Slim View Post
                        For the gun experts.

                        1)Is there a need to oil the metal surfaces that are in contact with the wooden stock(or those surfaces that are not accessible when the stock is attached). I usually never remove the stock but oil all the metal surfaces that are exposed and accesible only(including the bore and the mechanism). I have some mannlichher style stocks where the barrel is almost completely inaccessible unless the stock is completely taken out.

                        2) What care is required for the wooden stock ? What products are recommended for stock care ?

                        Thanks.
                        Most important of all, make sure you haven't got one up the spout!! lcm1
                        'By Horse by Tram'.


                        I was in when they needed 'em,not feeded 'em.
                        " Youuu 'Orrible Lot!"

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Sorry chris, but this discussion is on real firearms. I wouldn't know the first thing about cleaning an airsoft replica. I know that when I played paintball, cleaning consisted of using a water hose, followed by a rag, and maybe a toothbrush to get the pesky bits out. But that whole thing consisted of aircraft aluminum and fired by compressed air. You would never, ever, ever, in a million years clean a real rifle with the same method (with the caveat of you could use that method to get major fouling off, but then you'd better attack with some serious oil)
                          Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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                          • #14
                            Well, my maintenance expertise is somewhat limited - and mostly to stripping down and cleaning of my K98. I dd have to remove very old (possible Russian) varnish as it was a Russian capture. This came off with nitro mors and smoe wire wool soaked in white spirit. After drying I used dry wire wool on it again, then it got 5 or 6 coats of boiled linseed oil with a day or so in between each coat to dry.

                            The woodwork came up prettty nicely truth be told - even for a laminated stock (which most of them were).

                            For cleaning of the mechanism, bolt and barrel I used Parker Hail cleaning fluid (303 rings a bell) and Parker Hale oil for lubing and protecting. I do have an RG34 cleaning kit for it, but also use more modern patches, have 3 cleaning rods which screw together to do the full length of the barrel and also a more modern 'Hoppes Bore Snake'.

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                            • #15
                              The bore snake is a good device for a quick field cleaning, or removing excess build up as a way to start cleaning. Typically I use the bore snake when I'm using one of my relatively low-maintenance weapons (Glock, AR, etc) and I'm going to be putting a lot of rounds through it over several days of training. After spending twelve hours or so on the range and over an hour in commute, the last thing I want to do is pull out the whole kit, just to get it dirty tomorrow, so out comes the old sock, the Remoil, the bore snake, and the toothbrush for a fast clean that'll tide me over till the training evolution is complete and I can put in the time (more than an hour for me to do my AR to my satisfaction).

                              As for cleaning rods, I can't recommend enough that for your long rifles you should get a full-length cleaning rod of the proper caliber. They make some really good ones, including ones that have a swivel-loaded handle to make pushing a patch through that much easier, and coated in nylon or other materials to protect the bore from being scraped. Even good sectional rods can scrape along the bore and in time do damage.

                              But whatever you do, if you have a vintage rifle and it came with one of these ball-chain pull throughs (the Enfields were notorious for them), do not use it unless you're trying to make your rifle into a shotgun. They positively ruin the bore. They were a wartime expedient so that the cleaning kit for British and Commonwealth troops was smaller, but most definitely not recommended, or even desired at all.
                              Tacitos, Satrap of Kyrene

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