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Best Medieval General in Europe

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  • Best Medieval General in Europe

    Who do you think is the best European Medieval General?

    Say, from 1066 through 1500.

    Vote and talk about it.
    0
    William the Conqueror
    0%
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    Alexander Nievsky
    0%
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    Janos Hunyadi
    0%
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    El Cid
    0%
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    St. Olaf of Norway
    0%
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    Joan of Arc
    0%
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    Goetz von Berlichtingen
    0%
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    William Wallace "Braveheart"
    0%
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    Robert the Bruce
    0%
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    Edward I "Longshanks"
    0%
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    Edward III of England
    0%
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    Sir John Hawkwood
    0%
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    Richard the Lionhearted
    0%
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    Jean of Luxemburg
    0%
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    Harald Haardraada
    0%
    0
    None of these guys! I'll name mine below.
    0%
    0

    The poll is expired.

    Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
    Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


    "Never pet a burning dog."

    RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
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  • #2
    Philip Augustus wasn't too bad. Voted for Richard and William.
    Stay Alert, Stay Alive!

    Comment


    • #3
      best medieval general

      Vauban, unrivalled in siegecraft.
      Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
      (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

      Comment


      • #4
        Bill!

        As much as it pains me, it has to be William the Conqueror. In 1066 he achieved with limited technology something that Nazi Germany found impossible in 1940 with the resources of most of Europe at their disposal.

        And he was a thoroughly nice bloke (maybe) .

        Dr. S.
        Imagine a ball of iron, the size of the sun. And once a year a tiny sparrow brushes its surface with the tip of its wing. And when that ball of iron, the size of the sun, is worn away to nothing, your punishment will barely have begun.

        www.sinisterincorporated.co.uk

        www.tabletown.co.uk

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        • #5
          I had to go with William Wallace. The man just knew how to get the people involved. Without the people being involved, what forces would you have to fight with. If not for Wallace, Robert the Bruce would not have been as apt to fight on after Wallaces death and eventually free Scotland from English rule.

          I read somewhere that his sword is on display.......it is supposedly 5 1/2 feet long..............Geeee. Thats one heck of a blade.

          Mark
          Deo Vindice
          Si vis pacem, para bellum. (If you want peace, prepare for war.)

          Comment


          • #6
            I went with William of Normandy (the Conqueror). He won battles, and a country, not so much by employing superior numbers but by strategy, superior tactics, and cunning.

            Consider he would not have even been in the line for the English crown were it not for his cunning.

            Comment


            • #7
              Now this is a period I am weak at, although I've heard of almost all the kings/generals on your list. I thought The Bruce for freeing Scotland, for is perseverance and is leadership at Bannockburn.
              http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

              Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

              Comment


              • #8
                100 years war, General,

                King Henry V with his victory at Agincourt, (25 October 1415), ranks him as one of the best Medieval Generals in Europe. His choice of ground to fight a numerically superior force of Mounted Knights was inspired.
                The loss of a Generation of French nobles, was a tramatic experience for the people of France. Peace was eventually made between England and France. Though with the Death of King Henry, to disease?. It was war all over again.

                Shakespeare, immortalized the events leading up to the battle and the battle itself.
                Two movies, 1944 Sir Laurence Olivier, and 1989 Kenneth Branagh, are well worth the time invested to watch.
                :thumb:
                Only Tearful, Animal Man Through the Nature of his Being is Destined to
                a Life of Warfare...

                Comment


                • #9
                  Re: 100 years war, General,

                  Originally posted by Scout Out
                  King Henry V with his victory at Agincourt, (25 October 1415), ranks him as one of the best Medieval Generals in Europe. His choice of ground to fight a numerically superior force of Mounted Knights was inspired.
                  The loss of a Generation of French nobles, was a tramatic experience for the people of France. Peace was eventually made between England and France. Though with the Death of King Henry, to disease?. It was war all over again.

                  Shakespeare, immortalized the events leading up to the battle and the battle itself.
                  Two movies, 1944 Sir Laurence Olivier, and 1989 Kenneth Branagh, are well worth the time invested to watch.
                  :thumb:
                  I've read a bit on this battle. From what I read, it seems the French barred the route to the English army and it wasn't Henry who decided the battlefield. Further, it seems the major contributing factors in the french rout were two: the english longbowmen and the mud. If that is the case, then Henry was just in charge of this Army and might be overated. Can you please inform me if you have any more info on this battle, specially in relation to Henry's direction of it? I'm fascinated by great battles of history. Thanks
                  http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                  Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    dannybou,

                    These are/were just my words and interpetation of King Henry's victory at Agincourt. I probably have read about the same amount of books that many others have. It is just my way of looking at the battle.

                    I tend to believe both sides had a part in the choice of ground where this battle was fought. (Any battle needs two sides). At some point both sides would stop and prepare for battle. Both sides have a hand in this.

                    King Henry made the specific choice of where his men would fight when he made camp. At the end of a long bowling alley Flanked by Forest. His use of English Longbowmen behind a wall of Sharpened wooden stakes, has always been known as a factor towards the victory. The Weather intervened in King Henry's favor. (God's will?)
                    I have read that King Henry was a firm believer in God, and made it known, it was not his victory but God's.

                    Really (IMHO), it was the men who fought under King Henry, and did not break and run, but stood and fought against a host of French Chivalry that deserves the credit.
                    The French could not run away, they were sure of victory and pride was their undoing.
                    They were their own worst enemy.

                    It took the Leadership of King Henry to bring it all together and achieve victory for that small outnumbered army.

                    Looking over the list of "Generals", It was my intention to remind, nay, remember this small encounter of men at war.
                    Was King Henry a Great General? Able to stand tall with others on this list?
                    Yea, I say. :thumb:

                    For those that wish to read a little Shakspeare, here you are.

                    KING HENRY V

                    What's he that wishes so?
                    My cousin Westmoreland?
                    No, my fair cousin:
                    If we are mark'd to die, we are enow
                    To do our country loss; and if to live,
                    The fewer men, the greater share of honour.

                    God's will!
                    I pray thee, wish not one man more.

                    By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
                    Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
                    It yearns me not if men my garments wear;
                    Such outward things dwell not in my desires:
                    But if it be a sin to covet honour,
                    I am the most offending soul alive.

                    No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England:
                    God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour
                    As one man more, methinks, would share from me
                    For the best hope I have.
                    O, do not wish one more!

                    Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
                    That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
                    Let him depart; his passport shall be made
                    And crowns for convoy put into his purse:
                    We would not die in that man's company
                    That fears his fellowship to die with us.

                    This day is called the feast of Crispian:
                    He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
                    Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
                    And rouse him at the name of Crispian.

                    He that shall live this day, and see old age,
                    Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
                    And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian:'
                    Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
                    And say 'These wounds I had on Crispin's day.'

                    Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
                    But he'll remember with advantages
                    What feats he did that day: then shall our names.

                    Familiar in his mouth as household words
                    Harry the king, Bedford and Exeter,
                    Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester,
                    Be in their flowing cups freshly remember'd.

                    This story shall the good man teach his son;
                    And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
                    From this day to the ending of the world,
                    But we in it shall be remember'd;

                    We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
                    For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
                    Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
                    This day shall gentle his condition:
                    And gentlemen in England now a-bed
                    Shall think themselves accursed they were not here,
                    And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
                    That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.

                    http://the-tech.mit.edu/Shakespeare/henryv/index.html

                    Inspired to say the least. :bowdown:
                    Only Tearful, Animal Man Through the Nature of his Being is Destined to
                    a Life of Warfare...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks Scout. :thumb:
                      http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                      Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Comnenus

                        Certainly William of Normandy has had a good press and can be rated among the best in a group of otherwise poor practitioners of the military art. None of those listed, including William, merits serious consideration in the application of either tactics or strategy. Some were able to grasp momentary glory in brutal battle but none left any real mark on this thing called warfare.

                        William's claim to fame was a combination of luck and good weather. His "battles" were not exceptionally well trained or well led. Fortunately for him, Harold had come hard from a very trying victory in the North at Stamford Bridge. Harold did not wait to draw the Saxon levies but taking in hand his own Housecarls move far too quickly to meet the new danger at Hastings. Examination of the battle produces no novelty. It was a bloody brutal pushing match without military finesse. While it undoubtedly ranks as a watershed in English and European history it certainly does not warrent evidence of military genius.

                        There is one area however, in the historical period in question, that might offer some semblence of military art on a par with those of the Classical forebears. This is the Byzantine Empire and two Emperors in particular. Alexius Comnenus and his son John II Comnenus. Against seemingly overwhelming odds these Generals used both effective statecraft as well as stratigic and tactical skills to resurrect the Greek empire and strengthen Europe's eastern bulwark. Western Europe's debt to Byzantium's centuries long struggle against the East has went largely un-noticed and unharalded. Comnenus' commanded both armies and naval forces of size far surpassing any single Western King in that period. They coordinated strategy and dealt with logistical issues that place Williams efforts in paltry comparison. Through their efforts and the efforts of their successors, the Crusaders notwithstanding, Constantinople remained to hold back the tide of Islam for nearly two more centuries. It is unfortunate that we ignore their military achievements and technologies.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: dannybou,

                          Originally posted by Scout Out
                          I tend to believe both sides had a part in the choice of ground where this battle was fought. (Any battle needs two sides). At some point both sides would stop and prepare for battle. Both sides have a hand in this.

                          King Henry made the specific choice of where his men would fight when he made camp. At the end of a long bowling alley Flanked by Forest. His use of English Longbowmen behind a wall of Sharpened wooden stakes, has always been known as a factor towards the victory. The Weather intervened in King Henry's favor. (God's will?)
                          I have read that King Henry was a firm believer in God, and made it known, it was not his victory but God's.
                          [/B]
                          Henry picked the ground after a long retreat, but the rainy weather is what really defeated the French, that and the lack of control over their various forces.
                          Lance W.

                          Peace through superior firepower.

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                          • #14
                            Charlemagne and Barbarossa could be considered as well.
                            Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                            (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Re: Bill!

                              Originally posted by Doctor Sinister
                              As much as it pains me, it has to be William the Conqueror. In 1066 he achieved with limited technology something that Nazi Germany found impossible in 1940 with the resources of most of Europe at their disposal.

                              And he was a thoroughly nice bloke (maybe) .

                              Dr. S.
                              Why does the selection of the Tanner's grandson pain you? Are you some kind of Saxon holdover?

                              JS
                              Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                              Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                              "Never pet a burning dog."

                              RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                              http://www.mormon.org
                              http://www.sca.org
                              http://www.scv.org/
                              http://www.scouting.org/

                              Comment

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