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Roman roads in the middle ages

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  • Roman roads in the middle ages

    I have been intrigued by the Roman road system, which had:
    https://www.bing.com/search?q=roman+...04&FORM=YASBRD
    a full public administration to keep them up
    In Bernard Cornwall's novels, the system keeps falling apart( or being stolen piece by piece.) in Saxon , and later in Norman England.
    Was there any attempt to rebuild these roads, or keep them up, after the fall of the roman Empire?
    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

  • #2
    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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    • #3
      Now that you bring it up, I am curious about that too.

      Compare your map to Google Earth, maybe they were paved over and still being used today... in a way.

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      • #4
        Any explanation as to why there are two 'Isca' on the map?
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        • #5
          Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
          Any explanation as to why there are two 'Isca' on the map?
          Isca Augusta (Caerleon) and Isca Dumnoniorum (Exeter).
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Phaing View Post
            Now that you bring it up, I am curious about that too.

            Compare your map to Google Earth, maybe they were paved over and still being used today... in a way.
            Definitely, made into tourist routes even, no reason to waste a good road

            https://www.visitwapi.be/en/become-a...ng-roman-road/

            Heerweg.jpg

            And of course as subject of more "serious" historical research :

            https://lib.ugent.be/fulltxt/RUG01/0...15_0001_AC.pdf
            Last edited by Snowygerry; 04 Dec 19, 04:52.
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            • #7
              Roman roads ARE overrated,

              You try traveling this road with your goat cart and tell me you didn't wish you took the scenic route.

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              • #8
                We had some Euro engineers out here some years back trying to figure out why our highways cost so much more to look after than Euro ones. Turns out we built ours based on cattle tracks while the European (or at least the west) followed the old Roman straight lines rather than always being close to a river to keep the cattle fed and grazed. I'd assume that the US and Canada had the same deal as us until the national highway system took over.
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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Herman Hum View Post
                  Any explanation as to why there are two 'Isca' on the map?
                  North Isca: South Isca....
                  The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                    Roman roads ARE overrated,

                    You try traveling this road with your goat cart and tell me you didn't wish you took the scenic route.

                    Still a damned sight better than traveling on this:



                    Before the Romans, "roads" -- as we've known them for two millennia -- didn't exist. At most they were paths hewn by by feet, be they human or animal. They usually followed the local topographical contours, or whatever drunken amblings a prehistoric pathfinder's whimsy took. And since they were paved, they were less likely to be washed out or inundated with mud. All in all, I'd say that Rome's version of the road was a tectonic improvement over what had preceded it.

                    Originally posted by Rojik View Post
                    We had some Euro engineers out here some years back trying to figure out why our highways cost so much more to look after than Euro ones. Turns out we built ours based on cattle tracks while the European (or at least the west) followed the old Roman straight lines rather than always being close to a river to keep the cattle fed and grazed. I'd assume that the US and Canada had the same deal as us until the national highway system took over.
                    The old New York Central Rail Road followed the Water Level Route.



                    Those rails are still in use today, running right alongside the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers and the Eire Canal. Close to the rails are vehicular roads: US-9, US-9W, NY-5, etc. It was simply easier and cheaper building roads to the earth's contours rather than bridging depressions and tunneling through hills. That kind of contouur hugging road makes itself obvious with NYC's Yellowstone Boulevard: until it just before it reaches its eastern terminus, it resides snugly in a little valley that appears to me to be a dried river bed. Such road so dominate this portion of the country that when I-88 first opened -- following the top of a ridgeline for a good deal of its length -- my engineer cousin opined that it was refreshing to finally have a western-style highway 'round here.
                    Last edited by slick_miester; 04 Dec 19, 12:16.
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                    • #11





                      Engineering fail...

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                      • #12
                        was there any nation or area where they kept up the road network, aftr the fall of the western Roman empire?
                        The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by marktwain View Post
                          was there any nation or area where they kept up the road network, aftr the fall of the western Roman empire?
                          It depends on who you ask.

                          Some people seem to think that all Europeans were ignorant savages who didn't know anything except how to plod through the mud in a straight line. Others say that they knew very well who the Romans were and that they were frustrated that no such works were happening in their time.

                          Common sense suggests that yes, some roads were maintained. The ones we have that are still around today.... unless those pictures are from time-travelers.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by marktwain View Post
                            was there any nation or area where they kept up the road network, aftr the fall of the western Roman empire?
                            Kept up, and/or added to, the Romans roads were not always where we needed them, mostly they weren't.

                            There was a of course a long period without central authority - roads were a "private" affair then, not a national one.

                            Most old, functional, stone roads that survive today here (Gent) date to the 16th century.

                            Other parts of Belgium still have roads that date to (follow the same trajectory) the Spanish, Austrian or French period, as the case may be
                            Last edited by Snowygerry; 05 Dec 19, 08:52.
                            Major Atticus Finch - ACW Rainbow Game.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by slick_miester View Post

                              Still a damned sight better than traveling on this:



                              Before the Romans, "roads" -- as we've known them for two millennia -- didn't exist. At most they were paths hewn by by feet, be they human or animal. They usually followed the local topographical contours, or whatever drunken amblings a prehistoric pathfinder's whimsy took. And since they were paved, they were less likely to be washed out or inundated with mud. All in all, I'd say that Rome's version of the road was a tectonic improvement over what had preceded it.



                              The old New York Central Rail Road followed the Water Level Route.



                              Those rails are still in use today, running right alongside the Hudson and Mohawk Rivers and the Eire Canal. Close to the rails are vehicular roads: US-9, US-9W, NY-5, etc. It was simply easier and cheaper building roads to the earth's contours rather than bridging depressions and tunneling through hills. That kind of contouur hugging road makes itself obvious with NYC's Yellowstone Boulevard: until it just before it reaches its eastern terminus, it resides snugly in a little valley that appears to me to be a dried river bed. Such road so dominate this portion of the country that when I-88 first opened -- following the top of a ridgeline for a good deal of its length -- my engineer cousin opined that it was refreshing to finally have a western-style highway 'round here.
                              VI.

                              Each day a hundred thousand rout
                              Followed the zigzag calf about

                              And o'er his crooked journey went
                              The traffic of a continent.

                              A Hundred thousand men were led,
                              By one calf near three centuries dead.

                              They followed still his crooked way,
                              And lost one hundred years a day;

                              For thus such reverence is lent,
                              To well established precedent.


                              VII.

                              A moral lesson this might teach
                              Were I ordained and called to preach;

                              For men are prone to go it blind
                              Along the calf-paths of the mind,

                              And work away from sun to sun,
                              To do what other men have done.

                              They follow in the beaten track,
                              And out and in, and forth and back,

                              And still their devious course pursue,
                              To keep the path that others do.

                              They keep the path a sacred groove,
                              Along which all their lives they move.

                              But how the wise old wood gods laugh,
                              Who saw the first primeval calf.

                              Ah, many things this tale might teach—
                              But I am not ordained to preach.

                              This poem is in the public domain.More Sam Foss >
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                              The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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