Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Castle Harlech

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    great point. I was given a tour of a firebrick factory, now a museum, in Avonlea Sask the massive 20 ft wide kilns took fourteen days firing- seven to reach glazing temperatures, seven more to cool without cracking Temperature control was a science, or Black art.....
    The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

    Comment


    • #32
      Post 16, point #4 explains why Richard, duke of York, came boiling out of his Sanding castle stronghold on Dec 30Ca 1460 to take on Lancastrians outnumbering him three to one....
      ' horse pillow! A Horse pillow! my kingdom for a horse pillow!"

      Like father, - like Second son.....
      "
      Last edited by marktwain; 24 Dec 18, 19:42.
      The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

      Comment


      • #33
        It looks pretty solid, would a restoration be possible?

        Roofing would help it survive the coming centuries, and the wooden flooring would not be so difficult. What else would be required?
        "Why is the Rum gone?"

        -Captain Jack

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by The Exorcist View Post
          It looks pretty solid, would a restoration be possible?

          Roofing would help it survive the coming centuries, and the wooden flooring would not be so difficult. What else would be required?
          Oodles of cash. The roofing if kept in line with both the original building and current desires to avoid plastics would have to be leaded and lead is not cheap these days
          Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
          Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

          Comment


          • #35
            There would also be problems with the floors (and doors and window frames/shutters etc) if authentic materials were used as Historic England (or some Welsh equivalent) would almost certainly insist. Whereas from about the end of the 18th century onwards pine has been the common wood used for these purposes, in Medieval days floor boards were oak and elm was used for internal doors, windows and other fittings (including lining privies). Oak was much more available in those days more so than pine which mainly had to be imported from the Baltic. England's mighty oak forests have largely gone and oak for building is scarce and expensive. Since Dutch Elm disease ravaged Europe elm is even scarcer.
            Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
            Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

            Comment


            • #36
              One thing more - in the 1300s there was standardisation in the dimensions of timber used in buildings. These were established, monitored and maintained by the Carpenters' Guild, later to become one of the London livery companies - The Carpenters' Company. These defined the length, breadth and thickness of different kinds of boards for example and included matters such as the dimensions of kingposts, joists etc etc. The old regulations are reproduced in the journal Constriction History, Vol.7, 1991. These standards were different from modern ones so that if you wanted to reproduce a medieval floor or roof rather than just bunging in any old structure you cannot use timber cut in modern saw mills with jigs set to modern standard dimensions which means that you either have to set up a special facility or you cut it all by hand from felled timber, both options will be expensive. If cutting by hand it should be noted that oak building timbers were usually cut when the wood was green and therefore easier to saw and then allowed to season (for about a year) before being used. As seasoning involves some shrinkage the original cut has to be oversize. The amount of this has to be estimated by a master carpenter who knows his oak and can judge how much a particular batch will shrink. Such people are few and far between and have been since we ceased using oak to build ships and houses.

              I too would love to see castles like Harlech restored but fear it is not as easy at might be first thought.
              Last edited by MarkV; 17 Feb 19, 12:18.
              Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
              Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by MarkV View Post
                There would also be problems with the floors (and doors and window frames/shutters etc) if authentic materials were used as Historic England (or some Welsh equivalent) would almost certainly insist. Whereas from about the end of the 18th century onwards pine has been the common wood used for these purposes, in Medieval days floor boards were oak and elm was used for internal doors, windows and other fittings (including lining privies). Oak was much more available in those days more so than pine which mainly had to be imported from the Baltic. England's mighty oak forests have largely gone and oak for building is scarce and expensive. Since Dutch Elm disease ravaged Europe elm is even scarcer.
                So one may safely assume that our beloved French Canadian custom of multi coloured Vinyl siding is "off the Table"'
                along with the practice of whitewashing ye olde tractor tires, half burying them in the front lawn, and filling them with planted geraniums?


                The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

                Comment


                • #38
                  Used to live in that neck of the woods surrounded by fantastic Norman castles - Caernarfon, Beaumaris, Conwy, Chirk, Harlech - and a few Welsh ones - Criccieth, Dolbardarn, Dolwyddelan ... etc.

                  But I always had a soft spot for Harlech. The location is just incredible - basically it's built on top of a 200 ft high rock. The architecture - all of William I's castles in Wales are incredible structures but there's just something so aesthetically beautiful about Harlech.

                  Then you've got the famous siege song 'Men of Harlech' (think the iconic scene in Zulu), not to mention its pivotal role in so many skirmishes over the years. Wars of the Roses, English Civil War, Captured by Glyndwr. It's just a magical place.

                  The attached pic better shows it's wonderful location .... The_castle,_Harlech_Castle,_Wales_LOC_3751638943.jpg
                  "COOMMAAAAAAANNNNDOOOO!!!!!"
                  - Mad Jack Churchill.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Beeston Castle in Cheshire is on an equally impressive mount. With what was once said to be the deepest well in Europe and large storage caverns in the rock it was deemed impregnable as given the transport of the day any army large enough to lay siege to it would run out of food and water long before the garrison did. It was only ever taken twice both times by betrayal from within. It guarded both the Northern end of the Welsh Marches and the approach to Chester, which in the days when Liverpool was not much more than an overgrown fishing village was the main port for shipping to and from Ireland and somewhat strategic when that island was a fruitful source of mercenaries. Probably for that reason Cromwell had it thoroughly slighted so that it is now less of an iconic castle than Harlech.
                    Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
                    Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

                    Comment

                    Latest Topics

                    Collapse

                    Working...
                    X