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Common bonds between the Knights Templar's and the Knights of Saladin

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  • Common bonds between the Knights Templar's and the Knights of Saladin

    The Sovereign Magistral Order of the Temple of Solomon recognizes that our Muslim friends in the tradition of Saladin historically embodied and promoted the same Codes of Honour as the Knights Templar. Despite popular misconceptions, it is a historical fact that the original Templar Order found common bonds of unity with the Muslim (Saracen) Knights of Saladin, rooted in shared ancient principles of Chivalry and spiritual Faith. Accordingly, members of the modern Order also know that both traditions continue to be connected, and remain united in mutual respect and interfaith cooperation.
    ....
    European university historians, translating and verifying from Arabic sources, confirmed that despite the differences in genuine religious beliefs, the Muslim Saladin earned great respect from Christian noble lords and the Knights Templar. King Richard once praised Saladin as a “Great Prince”, saying that he was without a doubt the greatest and most powerful leader in the Islamic world. Saladin reciprocated by declaring that there was not a more honourable Christian lord than Richard.

    It was also reported that one time when King Richard was wounded in battle, Saladin offered the services of his personal physician, a noble show of great favour, since Muslim medicine was renowned as the best in the Western world at the time.

    During the winter of 1191-1192 AD, Richard the Lionheart was suffering from a fever, while he and his Knights were recovering from the previous battle of Arsur, to gather strength for the next planned battle in Jerusalem. Richard knew that Saladin was a strict Muslim, and that Islam shared the fundamental Christian values requiring to help those in need. By now the mutually earned respect was so strong between the Knights Templar and the Saracens of Saladin, that King Richard was able to appeal to his otherwise nemesis Saladin, requesting fresh water and fresh fruit to cure his fever. Saladin sent a gift of pure frozen snow and fresh fruit to all of the Templars for their health.

    More examples of the nobility and honor of Muslims and Christians during the Crusades can be accessed here,

    http://www.knightstemplarorder.org/m...alry-templars#
    Last edited by Taieb el-Okbi; 04 Dec 15, 12:50.

  • #2
    The Knights Templar ceased to exist in 1312. The organization who you cite is a modern one with absolutely no link to the original Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon that fought in the Crusades. I don't put much stock in the opinions of people who are pretenders to a long dead name. I could claim to be a member of the Legio IX Hispana if I wanted to but that doesn't mean I am or that I'm an expert on 2nd century Scotland.
    Last edited by frisco17; 04 Dec 15, 13:21.
    "Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl." - Frederick the Great

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    • #3
      Originally posted by frisco17 View Post
      The Knights Templar ceased to exist in 1312. The organization who you cite is a modern one with absolutely no link to the original Poor Fellow-Soldiers of Christ and of the Temple of Solomon that fought in the Crusades. I don't put much stock in the opinions of people who are pretenders to a long dead name. I could claim to be a member of the Legio IX Hispana if I wanted to but that doesn't mean I am or that I'm an expert on 2nd century Scotland.
      Yes the KT was put on the shelf many years ago. That doesn't negate the factual information that has over the years been presented by both Muslim and Christian scholars irt the nobility of the Crusaders as well as the Arab Knights. The information you saw in the link was based on the following sources,

      ACADEMIC SOURCE REFERENCES FOR THIS TOPIC


      [1] Habeeb Salloum, Saladin Chivalry and the Crusades, Al-Hewar Center for Arab Culture and Dialogue, Washington DC (2005).

      [2] Titus Burckhardt, Moorish Culture in Spain, McGraw-Hill (1972), Reprinted by Fons Vitae (1999); Habeeb Salloum, Saladin Chivalry and the Crusades, Al-Hewar Center for Arab Culture and Dialogue, Washington DC (2005).

      [3] Habeeb Salloum, Saladin Chivalry and the Crusades, Al-Hewar Center for Arab Culture and Dialogue, Washington DC (2005).

      [4] Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, A Literary History of the Arabs, C. Scribner’s Sons, New York (1907), Reprinted by Cosimo Classics (2010), p.178, 287.

      [5] Lady Anne Blunt & Wilfrid S. Blunt, The Seven Golden Odes of Pagan Arabia, London (1903), Introduction, p.14; Quoted by Reynold Alleyne Nicholson, A Literary History of the Arabs, C. Scribner’s Sons, New York (1907), Reprinted by Cosimo Classics (2010), p.88.

      [6] Habeeb Salloum, Muru’ah and the Code of Chivalry, Al-Hewar Center for Arab Culture and Dialogue, Washington DC (2005).

      [7] J. Morwood, A Dictionary of Latin Words and Phrases, Oxford University Press (1998), p.46.

      [8] Pir Zia Inayat-Khan, Saracen Chivalry: Counsels on Valor, Generosity and the Mystical Quest, Suluk Press, Omega Publications, New Lebanon New York (2012), Glossary: “Ojala”, p.179.

      [9] Documentary Film: Saladin, Richard the Lionheart and the Legacy of the Crusades, Channel 4, England (2011).

      [10] Morris Bishop, The Middle Ages, The American Heritage Library, American Heritage Inc., New York (1968), 2nd Edition, Houghton Mifflin, Boston (1985), American Heritage Library Series, Mariner Books (2001), p.102.

      [11] Malcolm Cameron Lyons & D.E.P. Jackson, Saladin: The Politics of the Holy War, University of Cambridge Oriental Publications (Book 30), 1st Edition, Cambridge University Press (1982), based on Arabic medieval manuscript sources, p.357.

      [12] Baha Al-Din Ibn Rafi Ibn Shaddad (Author), Donald S. Richards (Translator), The Rare and Excellent History of Saladin, Crusade Texts in Translation Series (Book 7), Ashgate Publications (2002), based on Arabic medieval manuscript sources, pp.147-148.

      [13] Malcolm Cameron Lyons & D.E.P. Jackson, Saladin: The Politics of the Holy War, University of Cambridge Oriental Publications (Book 30), 1st Edition, Cambridge University Press (1982), based on Arabic medieval manuscript sources, pp.325-326.

      [14] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, Great Britain (1941), Saint Martin’s Press, New York (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), p.150.

      [15] Sir Walter Scott, The Talisman, featured in: Tales of the Crusaders, Archibald Constable & Co., Edinburgh (1825), Volume 3; Sir Walter Scott, Introduction (1832), printed in: The Talisman: A Tale of the Crusaders, Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh (1868), pp.3-5.

      [16] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, Great Britain (1941), Saint Martin’s Press, New York (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), p.150.

      [17] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, Great Britain (1941), Saint Martin’s Press, New York (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), pp.160,163.

      [18] Abu Al-Hasan Ali Ibn Abu Bakr Al-Harawi, Discussion of the Strategems of War (12th century manuscripts); Featured in: William J. Hamblin, Saladin and Muslim Military Theory, in Binyamin Ze’ev Kedar (Editor), The Horns of Hattin, Society for the Study of the Crusades and the Latin East, Variorum Press, London (1992), p.236; Cited in: Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, Great Britain (1941), Saint Martin’s Press, New York (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), p.162.

      [19] Abu Al-Hasan Ali Ibn Abu Bakr Al-Harawi, Discussion of the Strategems of War (12th century manuscripts); Cited in: Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, Great Britain (1941), Saint Martin’s Press, New York (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), p.162.

      [20] Piers Paul Read, The Templars: The Dramatic History of the Knights Templar, the Most Powerful Military Order of the Crusades, Weidenfeld & Nicholson, Great Britain (1941), Saint Martin’s Press, New York (1999), Phoenix Press, London (2001), p.150.

      [21] Facts on File Library of World History, Encyclopedia of the Peoples of Africa and the Middle East, Infobase Publishing, Africa (2009), “Saladin”, p.386.

      [22] J. Gordon Melton, Faiths Across Time: 5,000 Years of Religious History, ABC-CLIO Publishing (2014), “1192”, “September 2, 1192”, p.786.

      [23] David Hume Esq., The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, New Edition (8 Volumes), A. Miller (Publisher), The Strand, London (1763), contributed to core collection of National Library of Scotland by David Hume as librarian to the Faculty of Advocates in Edinburgh, Volume 1, p.489, Volume 2, p.23.

      [24] Charles J. Rosebault, Saladin: Prince of Chivalry, Robert M McBride & Co, New York (1930), Chapter 1, “The Knighting of Saladin”, pp.1-3.

      [25] Pir Zia Inayat-Khan, Saracen Chivalry: Counsels on Valor, Generosity and the Mystical Quest, Suluk Press, Omega Publications, New Lebanon New York (2012), Introduction, p.xi.

      [26] Alan Butler and Stephen Dafoe, The Warriors and the Bankers, Lewis Masonic, Surrey, England (2006), pp.56-57.

      [27] Norma Lorre Goodrich, The Holy Grail, Harper Perennial (1993), p.272.

      [28] Henri de Curzon, La Règle du Temple, La Société de L’Histoire de France, Paris (1886), in Librairie Renouard, Rules 2, 14, 57.

      [29] Charles J. Rosebault, Saladin: Prince of Chivalry, Robert M McBride & Co, New York (1930), Chapter 1, pp.6,15.

      [30] David Hume Esq., The History of England: From the Invasion of Julius Caesar to the Revolution in 1688, New Edition (8 Volumes), A. Miller (Publisher), The Strand, London (1763), contributed to core collection of National Library of Scotland by David Hume as librarian to the Faculty of Advocates in Edinburgh, Volume 2, p.23.

      [31] Geoffrey de Vinsauf, History of the Expedition of Richard Coeur de Lion to the Holy Land (12th century), Translation from Latin, published in: Richard of Devizes & Geoffrey de Vinsauf, Chronicles of the Crusades: Contemporary Narratives of the Crusade of Richard Coer de Lion, Henry G. Bohn, Covent Garden, London (1848), Part 2, Chapter 5, pp.73-74.

      [32] Richard of Devizes & Geoffrey de Vinsauf, Chronicles of the Crusades: Contemporary Narratives of the Crusade of Richard Coer de Lion, Henry G. Bohn, Covent Garden, London (1848), Part 2, Chapter 5, p.76.

      [33] Charles J. Rosebault, Saladin: Prince of Chivalry, Robert M McBride & Co, New York (1930), Chapter 2, p.12.

      [34] Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883), translated in: Henry Frith, Chivalry, George Routledge & Sons, London (1891), Chapter III: Commandment IV

      [35] Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883), translated in: Henry Frith, Chivalry, George Routledge & Sons, London (1891), Chapter IV, Commandment X.

      [36] Emile Leon Gautier, La Chevalerie (1883), translated in: Henry Frith, Chivalry, George Routledge & Sons, London (1891), Chapter IV: Commandment VII.

      [37] Jonathan Phillips, Holy Warriors: A Modern History of the Crusades, The Bodley Head, division of Random House, London (2009), pp.327-331.

      [38] Adam Makos, Larry Alexander, A Higher Call: An Incredible True Story of Combat and Chivalry in the War-Torn Skies of World War II, 1st Edition, Berkley Hardcover (2012).

      [39] Shannon E. French, The Code of the Warrior: Exploring Warrior Values Past and Present (1970), Reprinted by Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (2003).

      [40] John Blake, Two Enemies Discover a ‘Higher Call’ in Battle, CNN Online Magazine (09 March 2013).

      [41] Steven Pressfield, Killing Rommel, Wheeler Publishing (2008), Broadway Books (2009), historical novel by a military historian.

      [42] Daniel N. Rolph, My Brother’s Keeper: Union and Confederate Soldiers’ Acts of Mercy During the Civil War, Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania (2002).


      Btw some sources suggest that some of the KT may have avoided persecution during the 14th century by sailing to places like North America.

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      • #4
        The Muslim writer Baha, during the Third Crusade (1189-1192 AD), described King Richard as “a very powerful man of great courage… a king of wisdom, courage and energy… brave and clever.”

        http://www.knightstemplarorder.org/m...alry-templars#

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        • #5
          The point is there is no connection to the past. While Christians and Muslims getting along in modern times is a plus and should be encouraged, your constant attempt to glorify past history in your endless attempts to raise the stock of today's Muslims is unnecessary and rather counterproductive.
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