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Any amateur of the Boer War?

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  • Any amateur of the Boer War?

    A bit of a not too popular war, it took me quite a few years to realize that Canada had sent troops to fight the Boers. Even won some V.C.'s. Any experts?
    http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

    Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

  • #2
    I really don't know much about it. I have an extremely rough idea of the war, its causes, who was fighting, how they fought, and its outcome, but thats about it.

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    • #3
      Re: Any amateur of the Boer War?

      Originally posted by dannybou
      A bit of a not too popular war, it took me quite a few years to realize that Canada had sent troops to fight the Boers. Even won some V.C.'s. Any experts?
      The Boer War! Man, that's almost unheard of in the US. More people know about the War of Jenkin's Ear.
      I hear a little about it here serving with the Brits, but only in very general terms. I don't know if it's still the case, but we used to study a hypothetical battle in the Boer War in the Combined Arms and Services Staff School (CAS3). There is a book called, I think,The "Battle of Rourke's Drift". In the first chapter,you walk through preparations to defend a village and screw everything up, as you read through chapter by chapter, you learn a little about small unit defense in a phased way. I have a copy but haven't read it in years.
      I had no idea there were Canucks down there -- that's about as far from Canada as you can be and still be on earth!
      Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
      Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


      "Never pet a burning dog."

      RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
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      http://www.sca.org
      http://www.scv.org/
      http://www.scouting.org/

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      • #4
        The Boar didnt take prisoners.
        The war left us with some new definitions.

        Like Commando

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        • #5
          Re: Re: Any amateur of the Boer War?

          Originally posted by Janos
          The Boer War! Man, that's almost unheard of in the US. More people know about the War of Jenkin's Ear.
          I hear a little about it here serving with the Brits, but only in very general terms. I don't know if it's still the case, but we used to study a hypothetical battle in the Boer War in the Combined Arms and Services Staff School (CAS3). There is a book called, I think,The "Battle of Rourke's Drift". In the first chapter,you walk through preparations to defend a village and screw everything up, as you read through chapter by chapter, you learn a little about small unit defense in a phased way. I have a copy but haven't read it in years.
          I had no idea there were Canucks down there -- that's about as far from Canada as you can be and still be on earth!
          You are right. How far can South Africa be from Canada. In any event, the british eventually won and occupied the Orange Free state and the Transvaal. Rorke's Drift occured about 20 years prior to the Boer war. Along with new words like commando, also came about "concentration camps". The british used them on the Boer population. (I hope I'm not going to stir a hornet's nest). There are a few war cemetaries in South Africa today about the war where canadian soldiers are burried.
          http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

          Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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          • #6
            Re: Re: Re: Any amateur of the Boer War?

            Originally posted by dannybou
            Rorke's Drift occured about 20 years prior to the Boer war.
            The Brits here talk about a first and second Boer War, the second one being the one we call "The Boer War" in the US (and apparently Canada).
            Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
            Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


            "Never pet a burning dog."

            RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
            http://www.mormon.org
            http://www.sca.org
            http://www.scv.org/
            http://www.scouting.org/

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            • #7
              I know of only the 1899-1902 one. Rorke's Drift actually occurred during the British-Zulu war in 1879. Have you got other dates you could pass on to me so I can research it? Thanks Janos.
              http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

              Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dannybou
                I know of only the 1899-1902 one. Rorke's Drift actually occurred during the British-Zulu war in 1879. Have you got other dates you could pass on to me so I can research it? Thanks Janos.
                That may not have been the name of the book, either. My memory is like a steel trap -- shut solid.

                "Wait out" on the dates.

                JS
                Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                "Never pet a burning dog."

                RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                http://www.mormon.org
                http://www.sca.org
                http://www.scv.org/
                http://www.scouting.org/

                Comment


                • #9
                  OK, it came to me last night, "The Defense of Duffer's Drift" is the name of the book.
                  Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                  Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                  "Never pet a burning dog."

                  RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                  http://www.mormon.org
                  http://www.sca.org
                  http://www.scv.org/
                  http://www.scouting.org/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thanks Janos. Just found the description on the net.
                    http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                    Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Re: Re: Any amateur of the Boer War?

                      Originally posted by Janos
                      The Boer War! Man, that's almost unheard of in the US. More people know about the War of Jenkin's Ear.
                      I hear a little about it here serving with the Brits, but only in very general terms. I don't know if it's still the case, but we used to study a hypothetical battle in the Boer War in the Combined Arms and Services Staff School (CAS3). There is a book called, I think,The "Battle of Rourke's Drift". In the first chapter,you walk through preparations to defend a village and screw everything up, as you read through chapter by chapter, you learn a little about small unit defense in a phased way. I have a copy but haven't read it in years.
                      I had no idea there were Canucks down there -- that's about as far from Canada as you can be and still be on earth!
                      The Battle of Rourke's Drift is fron the Zulu War not the Boer War. Watch the movie "Zulu", it was shot on the ground the actual battle occured on and is historically accurate.
                      Lance W.

                      Peace through superior firepower.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Re: Re: Re: Any amateur of the Boer War?

                        Originally posted by dannybou
                        You are right. How far can South Africa be from Canada. In any event, the british eventually won and occupied the Orange Free state and the Transvaal. Rorke's Drift occured about 20 years prior to the Boer war. Along with new words like commando, also came about "concentration camps". The british used them on the Boer population. (I hope I'm not going to stir a hornet's nest). There are a few war cemetaries in South Africa today about the war where canadian soldiers are burried.
                        The reason the British don't like to talk about The Boer War is because they were being soundly beaten in the field. They only gained control of the countryside by the use of "concentration" camps for civilians. If their had been a Geneva Convention in effect at the time the British likely would have been accused of war crimes.
                        Lance W.

                        Peace through superior firepower.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I think the Brits showed admirable restraint, given the nature
                          of the opposition. The Boer COULD have surrendered and let it go.
                          They chose not to do that. Ok great, but when your wife and
                          mom die of typhus in a concentration camp, remember that
                          it didnt need to be that way.

                          The Brits showed clearly the most efficient means to break
                          fanatic resistance. And kudos to them.

                          I wish we had the stomach to do the same in Iraq.

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                          • #14
                            You might be a fanatic too if an imperialistic aggressor systematically pushed you off your land. The only thing that makes it ironic is that the same group had been the imperialistic aggressor itself only generations before against the native population.

                            The British really had no interest in what became South Africa until gold and diamonds started showing up.

                            Give the Boers their due. They were collectively some of the best marksmen to ever fight in the field. Their fieldcraft was unparalleled, to the point that what they called themselves, commandos, has entered the lexicon with a much more specialized meaning. They were great horseman and their tactics as mounted infantry were revolutionary.

                            The best the British could do was to copy the tactics (usually with Commonwealth troops) of the Boers in the field. The Brits only tactical revolution was the use of civilian "concentration" camps. While little direct misconduct towards the civilians occurred from the British. The conditions were of questionable food supply and poor sanitation so disease quickly began to take the lives of the Boers' families.

                            Not that the Boers didn't have there own moral issues, but from a moral standpoint I think the 1899-1902 Boer War was an absolute low tide for the British Empire. Thankfully it recovered from this.
                            Lance W.

                            Peace through superior firepower.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Lance Williams
                              You might be a fanatic if an imperialistic aggressor systematically pushed you off your land. The only thing that makes it ironic is that the same group had been the imperialistic aggressor itself only generations before against the native population.

                              The British really had no interest in what became South Africa until gold and diamonds started showing up.

                              Give the Boers their due. They were collectively some of the best marksmen to ever fight in the field. Their fieldcraft was unparalleled, to the point that what they called themselves, commandos, has entered the lexicon with a much more specialized meaning. They were great horseman and their tactics as mounted infantry were revolutionary.

                              The best the British could do was to copy the tactics (usually with Commonwealth troops) of the Boers in the field. The Brits only tactical revolution was the use of civilian "concentration" camps. While little direct misconduct towards the civilians occurred from the British. The conditions were of questionable food supply and poor sanitation so disease quickly began to take the lives of the Boers' families.

                              Not that the Boers didn't have there own moral issues, but from a moral standpoint I think the 1899-1902 Boer War was an absolute low tide for the British Empire. Thankfully it recovered from this.
                              The purpose of war is to win. If you decide to use force, you should USE FORCE. End it. Temporizing simply gets more people
                              killed. The Boer were very very good. But they could NOT win.
                              OK so they fight on principle, I would as well. Until my family
                              started to suffer for my actions. Then, I would reconsider.

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