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  • Alexander's campaigns

    Any experts on this topic of one of the greatest military generals?
    http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

    Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

  • #2
    No expert, but Alexander did have an official historian (not sure if anything survives) and contemporary and later historians did write about his campaigns - not sure how accurately and extensively.
    Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
    (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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    • #3
      Accurate they are altogether not, (alexanders historians, even later ones, too) as many dissagree on some points and in some cases none of the historians agree. (some historians were really putting out more of propaganda and what Alexander wanted the people to know) These accounts are useful, although it might be difficult for the average reader to understand what was probably likely. The best book on Alexander is Peter Green's biography. He analyzes all of the ancient sources and presents good interpretations of some of the more controversial numbers, etc.

      Alexander is one of greatest generals of all time, and his campain are certainly worth taking a look at. The book I mentioned, Alexander of Macedon, by Peter Green, is the best book to start with.

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      • #4
        If you want to read up on him there is plenty out there. A must though is Arian's '' The Campaigns of Alexander''.

        Arian was an ex military man and Governor of Greek background in the Roman Empire of circa 150 AD, IIRC.

        He had access to sources now lost, like Ptomley's History.

        He is a good place to start anyway.
        http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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        • #5
          Arian would be the best classical source, as he is generally the most accurate, and it becomes obvious that Peter Green used him quite a bit. Probably the best classical source to start at.

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          • #6
            Phil Barker's Book

            Hello all,

            I got Phil Barker's Alexander The Great's Campaigns off a roommate about 20 years ago.

            It's a good history and also reference for settting up a miniatures
            campaign of Alexander and his allies and enemies. My roommate had an Alexandrian army and I had a feudal Japanese army.

            Unfortunately, I gave up miniatures gaming shortly after getting married.

            Dark_Hercule
            You can never have too much reconnaissance--Gen. G.S. Patton, Jr.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Peachy Carnehan
              Arian would be the best classical source, as he is generally the most accurate, and it becomes obvious that Peter Green used him quite a bit. Probably the best classical source to start at.
              Yes Peter Green's book is very good. Liked that one a lot.
              http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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              • #8
                Two rather negative things I read about Alexander, he was jealous of anyone else's popularity or fame (like most absolute rulers), petty and vindictive (see above) and quite arbitrary. Several times he had officers executed in a fit of rage or passion. Also, and in contrast to many other leaders, he never expressed any remorse when his rage or passion subsided.
                Mens Est Clavis Victoriae
                (The Mind Is The Key To Victory)

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by hogdriver
                  Two rather negative things I read about Alexander, he was jealous of anyone else's popularity or fame (like most absolute rulers), petty and vindictive (see above) and quite arbitrary. Several times he had officers executed in a fit of rage or passion. Also, and in contrast to many other leaders, he never expressed any remorse when his rage or passion subsided.
                  Alexander murdered his friend Clitus in a fit of drunken rage. When the king was sober again, he understood that he had made one of the greatest mistakes of his life. For three days, he considered suicide but then he decided to accept life again.
                  http://canadiangenealogyandresearch.ca

                  Soviet and Canadian medal collector!

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by hogdriver
                    Two rather negative things I read about Alexander, he was jealous of anyone else's popularity or fame (like most absolute rulers), petty and vindictive (see above) and quite arbitrary. Several times he had officers executed in a fit of rage or passion. Also, and in contrast to many other leaders, he never expressed any remorse when his rage or passion subsided.
                    That kind of thing was not unusual in less sophisticated times. The great Roman general, Flavius Aetius (my favorite), was killed because he became too popular so Caesar had him whacked.

                    I wonder also if a prodigy like Alexander had a hard time accepting the limited (by his standards) skills of others ("What do you mean you can't take the city? I did that when I was 22!")

                    JS
                    Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                    Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                    "Never pet a burning dog."

                    RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
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                    • #11
                      Aetius wasn't too popular after Chalons, sicne most of his men and officers wanted him to finish off the Huns.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Storm
                        Aetius wasn't too popular after Chalons, sicne most of his men and officers wanted him to finish off the Huns.
                        Ah! But officers and men don't have you killed. The emperor treated him well, but he was too popular and was soon put to death. I'll dig up more info on him.

                        JS
                        Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
                        Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


                        "Never pet a burning dog."

                        RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
                        http://www.mormon.org
                        http://www.sca.org
                        http://www.scv.org/
                        http://www.scouting.org/

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