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Sling bullet inscriptions

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  • Sling bullet inscriptions

    You know how we write messages today for our enemies on bombs, missiles, mortar rounds, and artillery shells? It seems this practice was common back then to inscribe sling bullets at least as far back as the 4th century BC.

    Greek sling-shot with the inscription ΔΕΞΑΙ (DEXAI) which means "Catch!". 4thC BC
    https://www.britishmuseum.org/collec...G_1851-0507-11
    rNSh4NpU_8hAVgqQrcFr1PEuh9POL4C_sXB_8ikNLM8.jpg?auto=webp&s=cf355c33aa757288db2410d1530ec10108278d1b.jpg
    The Europa Barbarorum II team [M2TW] needs YOUR HELP NOW HERE!

  • #2
    BOHICA!

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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    • #3
      Sure.
      Many lead projectiles carried the name of the launchers, such as "LEG XIII" (Legio XIII), or "ITAL" (an Italian legion or detachment), or "OPTERGI" (of Opitergium, a town that provided a slinger unit for a siege at Ascoli).
      Others carried the name of the army commander, such as "CAES IMP" (Caesar Imperator), or "POMP" (Pompeus).
      Others were more in line with the usage you refer to. A common Roman inscription on sling shots was "FERI" (Wound!), as an order to the round itself. Or "PETE CVLVM" (Hit the... backside). When Fulvia, the wife of Mark Antony, became involved as a leader in an insurrection against Octavianus, the troops besieging Perugia used rounds whose inscription wished the projectile to hit Fulvia in a body part soldiers lack. And so on.
      Michele

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