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Most challenging Roman provinces to govern

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  • Most challenging Roman provinces to govern

    I am doing research on the Roman provinces in the later Empire (200AD) and I was wondering which provinces were the most difficult to govern due to their geographical features (landscape/climate).
    Can I assume the Germania provinces were more difficult to manage because of the marshes, thick woods and hills? Syria and Africa due to the hot climate and deserts?

    Thanks for your thoughts on this

    Kind regards,
    Stratego

    Death is nothing, but to live defeated and inglorious is to die daily.- Napoleon

    It is better to fail in originality than to succeed in imitation.- Herman Melville

    Aut viam inveniam aut faciam

    BORG

  • #2
    Since you ask for around AD 200, that limits me. Dacia was a problem. Germania, are we talking the lower Rhine or inland? The main problem about Germania was paying for the campaign. Germania had no precious metals and trade worth the Roman's time. North Africa, Syria and Britain was mainly keeping Bandits cowed. You need to keep the lines of supply going to enter any of these places. Britain had enough Silver and Gold to pay for a Campaign, but there was none in Caledonia where most action would happen.

    Pruitt
    Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

    Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

    by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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    • #3
      Between AD 209 and 212 the Emperor Septimus Severus had to wage a long drawn out war in Northern Britain. He died in Eboracum (York) with Britain still in turmoil
      AD 259 Britain recognises the usurper Postumus and becomes part of the breakaway Gallic empire which survives until 274
      AD 287 Admiral Carausius seizes Britain and sets up a separate administration. Britain remains independent of Rome until 296 when Constantus defeats the usurper Allectus near Silchester
      All in all I'd say that Britain was a challenging province to even keep in the empire
      Human history becomes more and more a race between education and catastrophe (H G Wells)
      Mit der Dummheit kaempfen Goetter selbst vergebens (Friedrich von Schiller)

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      • #4
        They built 2 walls to keep us out.
        Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

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        • #5
          Germania superior and inferior would have been pretty 'exiting' postings for legionaries. However 200AD puts it between wars. The Macromannic wars finished in 180 and Alemanni weren't the problem they would be a decade later.
          Probably a lot of low level raiding going on though.
          "To be free is better than to be unfree - always."

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          • #6
            Originally posted by the ace View Post
            They built 2 walls to keep us out.
            One reason was the Scot's desire to sell Rome Strontium, which Rome had no need of until they developed \Electronics

            One often overlooked mineral desired by romans in Britain was salt , boiled in large lead flat pans. \\\\\\\We forget how precious salt was to the pre industrial world..
            https://www.saltassociation.co.uk/ed...y/roman-times/
            Last edited by marktwain; 01 Sep 19, 10:18.
            The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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            • #7
              Thrace and Moesia were a couple of handfuls.

              Regarding salt, the Romans got a lot from Hispania. Roman salt production at Vigo was massive and one of the salt mines is now a museum for salt. One display among many things is a massive block of salt.
              Last edited by Salinator; 01 Sep 19, 19:54. Reason: Spelling
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              • #8
                The Romans in Britain produced a lot of silver and lead, plus some gold. They also had salt flats in the rivers near what is now Liverpool. There were some Iron producing areas. These resources made it worth Rome's while to keep a fairly large garrison in Britain. The Scots and Irish did try to raid across the borders and Irish Sea. Thrace and Moesia were access ports for Barbarians across the Border.

                Pruitt
                Pruitt, you are truly an expert! Kelt06

                Have you been struck by the jawbone of an ASS lately?

                by Khepesh "This is the logic of Pruitt"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Pruitt View Post
                  The Romans in Britain produced a lot of silver and lead, plus some gold. They also had salt flats in the rivers near what is now Liverpool. There were some Iron producing areas. These resources made it worth Rome's while to keep a fairly large garrison in Britain. The Scots and Irish did try to raid across the borders and Irish Sea. Thrace and Moesia were access ports for Barbarians across the Border.

                  Pruitt
                  fortunately, ( for the Scots) they didn't discover the "god's jewel box" in the hills around Dumfries
                  then I suppose it is difficult to prospect when someone is a kilt keeps swinging a claymore at your rump whenever you bend over to examine the ground....

                  after the Teutonberger Wald wipe out, the Romans were leery about expanding too far into 'rough country'. Or putting anyone named Varrus in Command...
                  I surmise that any place in the empire without direct line of site on the cursus publicus was a \trouble spot\.
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cursus_publicus

                  The roman empire was not very popular among its subjects. Banditry was rife, and roving bandits, esp escaped slaves, hard to track down. Tax revenue couriers would have been a select target.

                  Last edited by marktwain; 06 Sep 19, 14:55.
                  The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by marktwain View Post

                    fortunately, ( for the Scots) they didn't discover the "god's jewel box" in the hills around Dumfries
                    then I suppose it is difficult to prospect when someone is a kilt keeps swinging a claymore at your rump whenever you bend over to examine the ground....

                    after the Teutonberger Wald wipe out, the Romans were leery about expanding too far into 'rough country'. Or putting anyone named Varrus in Command...
                    The Romans had bad luck with commanding Consuls with names starting with "V".
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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Salinator View Post

                      The Romans had bad luck with commanding Consuls with names starting with "V".
                      "well. that's one courier route we might just abandon....
                      Nearly half of all Roman legions in existence were sent to the Balkans to end the revolt, which was itself triggered by constant neglect, endemic food shortages, high taxes, and harsh behaviour on the part of the Roman tax collectors. This campaign, led by Tiberius and Quaestor Legatus Germanicus under
                      EmperorAugustus
                      , was one of the most difficult, and most crucial, in the history of the Roman Empire. Due to this massive redeployment of available legions, when Varus was named
                      Legatus Augusti pro praetore
                      in Germania, only three legions were available to him.




                      Wikipedia
                      The trout who swims against the current gets the most oxygen..

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                      • #12
                        I would suggest that examining the locations of the various legions would give an indication which were the problem areas.

                        Eg AD14
                        https://f.hypotheses.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/1447/files/2014/05/Roman-legions-14-AD-Centrici-site-Keilo-Jack-1024x660.jpg

                        Roman-legions-14-AD-Centrici-site-Keilo-Jack-1024x660.jpg
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