Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Roman Empire maps and places during their reign

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Roman Empire maps and places during their reign

    Right now I'm reading a serious book that's beyond my brain, but reading it anyways. It's called The decline and fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbons. I'm sure most of you know who he is, but understanding his writing is rough, at least for me.

    Anyways my question is the landscape during the Roman, Eastern and Western empire times. I'm basically looking for a specific book of maps (like huge maps) of the centuries over the roman empire spanning over the 1500+ years of them. So when it talks of a certain area, kind of like Gaul (which I see is somewhat in the France area) I know what he's talking about.

    It's neat to me where they expanded to but I would like to be able to locate these places he's talking about so I know what Gibbons is referring to. I also suck with geography as well, and Europe as it is now. I'm a very young person and trying to expand my mind.

    Oh and before someone says look at the interwebs and google it, I've tried that and I can't zoom the maps I've found to see the provinces. I would rather have like a book of fold out maps if I could buy some so I could have something to reference them too.

    Thanks a bunch in advance.

  • #2
    Just wondering why read this certain book? I wouldn't say reading Gibbons is the best thing to start off with.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by calger14 View Post
      Just wondering why read this certain book? I wouldn't say reading Gibbons is the best thing to start off with.
      I absolutely agree, but I'm new to that time of age and no one had any suggestions on another forum site I go to. I've read some good history books with good authors one of them being "The Crusades" By Thomas Asbridge which was an amazing read and so easy to read, but reading Gibbons is like reading calculus to me. I understand it somewhat but somethings are going over my head.

      Alot of good reviews on it is why I picked it up, and they said it really went over the entire time period really well.....so I picked it up. I get it, but I don't, if you know what I'm saying. I've just picked up some bad history books that where either biased or didn't cover enough topics, is the reason why I got it, because of the high reviews.

      Comment


      • #4
        You may find this map helpful.
        Paralus

        Ἐπὶ τοὺς πατέρας, ὦ κακαὶ κεφαλαί, τοὺς μετὰ Φιλίππου καὶ Ἀλεξάνδρου τὰ ὅλα κατειργασμένους;
        Wicked men, you sin against your fathers, who conquered the whole world under Philip and Alexander.

        Academia.edu

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Paralus View Post
          You may find this map helpful.

          Not bad, but it includes neither the Antonine Wall nor the Gask Ridge.
          Indyref2 - still, "Yes."

          Comment


          • #6
            Better map then I've ever seen! But I've never seen Corinium spelt 'Korinion'.

            Comment


            • #7
              The problem with the Gibbons book is that many of his conclusions have been largely set asset by more modern works. Gibbons was product of his times and there is a lot of religious/morality reasoning in his argument.

              A better choice would the Peter Heather's "The Fall of the Roamn Empire" or Adrian Goldworthy's "The Fall of the West". Gibbon could be read later once a better ground work in the period is established .
              The Purist

              Words ought to be a little wild, for they are the assault of thoughts on the unthinking - John Maynard Keynes.

              Comment


              • #8
                Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Penguin-Histor.../dp/0140513299 ? I don't know how accurate it is, but at least there are a lot of maps in it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by The Purist View Post
                  The problem with the Gibbons book is that many of his conclusions have been largely set asset by more modern works. Gibbons was product of his times and there is a lot of religious/morality reasoning in his argument.

                  A better choice would the Peter Heather's "The Fall of the Roamn Empire" or Adrian Goldworthy's "The Fall of the West". Gibbon could be read later once a better ground work in the period is established .
                  Thank you for your recommendations. I'm probably going to finish up Gibbons work, because I'm already 300 pages into it getting into the Constantine area, but I ALWAYS like to follow it up with another book or so to get another view point. As for the maps guys I highly appreciate it.

                  This time period intrigues me because anywhere you go in Europe for the most part you see places all over that have Roman artifacts. I believe the Romans set up a lot of things that we use even in today's society. I appreciate anything or anyone's advice about this once great time period in History.

                  Note: I think I am going to revisit my idea of sticking with Gibbons work and move on to something else. So those two books you have given me which one of those would you start with first?
                  Last edited by Jinxsters; 19 Nov 12, 11:12.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Peders View Post
                    Something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Penguin-Histor.../dp/0140513299 ? I don't know how accurate it is, but at least there are a lot of maps in it.
                    Oh Crap that is freaking awesome! Thanks a ton!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The history of the Republic has always interested me far more than what came after its fall. Without doubt, for me anyway, the most interesting and thought provoking work is Gruen's magisterial The Hellenistic World and the Coming of Rome.
                      Paralus

                      Ἐπὶ τοὺς πατέρας, ὦ κακαὶ κεφαλαί, τοὺς μετὰ Φιλίππου καὶ Ἀλεξάνδρου τὰ ὅλα κατειργασμένους;
                      Wicked men, you sin against your fathers, who conquered the whole world under Philip and Alexander.

                      Academia.edu

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I would suggest "The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire" by Edward Luttwak, especially if you are interested in a modern treatment of the military history of the empire. It's definitely a very readable and engaging presentation of the subject, covering the reign of Augustus through to the end of the western empire. It deals primarily with the organization of the armies and the frontiers, and the evolution of the strategy of defense of the empire against its enemies.
                        Gibbon is definitely a must-read for anyone seriously interested in the history of the empire, as his is the first really comprehensive treatment of the subject by a non-ancient source, but it is rather dated. Still a great work of historical literature, though.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Vik Beluso View Post
                          I would suggest "The Grand Strategy of the Roman Empire" by Edward Luttwak, especially if you are interested in a modern treatment of the military history of the empire. It's definitely a very readable and engaging presentation of the subject, covering the reign of Augustus through to the end of the western empire. It deals primarily with the organization of the armies and the frontiers, and the evolution of the strategy of defense of the empire against its enemies.
                          Gibbon is definitely a must-read for anyone seriously interested in the history of the empire, as his is the first really comprehensive treatment of the subject by a non-ancient source, but it is rather dated. Still a great work of historical literature, though.
                          I would not recommend the Luttwak book actually. It's been de-bunked pretty thoroughly. The problem with Luttwak is that he is not an ancient historian, he is a strategy analyst. His books on modern empires and military strategy are great, but he applies concepts to the Romans which are totally anachronistic. Historians of Rome have shown pretty convincingly that "Grand Strategy" is a concept that cannot really be applied to the Roman empire, at least not the way we think of it today and the way Luttwak means it. He assumes the Romans had the same world-view as we do now, which is entirely wrong.

                          I would recommend Susan Mattern's book, "Rome and the Enemy," if you want to get a better perspective on this stuff. It is much better than Luttwak's book!
                          Satis elouquentiae sapientiae parum

                          Diadochi Wars GAME:http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=140484

                          Comment

                          Latest Topics

                          Collapse

                          Working...
                          X