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  • Charles I, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland

    Charles I, 1600–1649, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625–49), second son of James I and Anne of Denmark. Charles I was really the great loser of the English Civil War...as well as his head.

    There were no decisive victories in the civil war until Charles was defeated at Marston Moor (1644) and Naseby (1645). In 1646 he gave himself up to the Scottish army, which delivered him to Parliament. He was ultimately taken over by the English army leaders, who were now highly suspicious of Parliament. He escaped (Nov., 1647) to Carisbrooke, on the Isle of Wight, where he concluded an alliance with the discontented Scots, which led to the second civil war (1648) and another royalist defeat. Parliament, now reduced in number by Pride's Purge and controlled by Charles's most powerful enemies, established a special high court of justice, which tried Charles and convicted him of treason for levying war against Parliament. He was beheaded on Jan. 30, 1649. To the royalists he became the martyred king and author of the Eikon Basilike. By his opponents he was considered a double-dealing tyrant.

    After Cromwell's "protectorate" ended, Charles's son Charles II became King.

    References:
    http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0920730.html
    Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
    Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


    "Never pet a burning dog."

    RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
    http://www.mormon.org
    http://www.sca.org
    http://www.scv.org/
    http://www.scouting.org/

  • #2
    Re: Charles I, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland

    Originally posted by Janos
    Charles I, 1600–1649, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland (1625–49), second son of James I and Anne of Denmark. Charles I was really the great loser of the English Civil War...as well as his head.

    There were no decisive victories in the civil war until Charles was defeated at Marston Moor (1644) and Naseby (1645). In 1646 he gave himself up to the Scottish army, which delivered him to Parliament. He was ultimately taken over by the English army leaders, who were now highly suspicious of Parliament. He escaped (Nov., 1647) to Carisbrooke, on the Isle of Wight, where he concluded an alliance with the discontented Scots, which led to the second civil war (1648) and another royalist defeat. Parliament, now reduced in number by Pride's Purge and controlled by Charles's most powerful enemies, established a special high court of justice, which tried Charles and convicted him of treason for levying war against Parliament. He was beheaded on Jan. 30, 1649. To the royalists he became the martyred king and author of the Eikon Basilike. By his opponents he was considered a double-dealing tyrant.

    After Cromwell's "protectorate" ended, Charles's son Charles II became King.

    References:
    http://www.infoplease.com/ce6/people/A0920730.html

    Charles I was a vain, conceited stubborn man. That been said he was perfectly within his constitutional rights as King of England anyway to rule as he wanted.

    He should have displayed more political savvy when dealing with his political opponents over the years though.

    They were ambitious men who had both political and religious goals different to the Monarch's.

    Basically they wanted the English Parliament to have more powers and also the Puritans wanted the Established Church to be reformed.
    Things were building for a head over many years and after the disastrous ''Wars'' against the Scots in 1639/40 it was apparent to all that the Royal Army was a useless force.

    What triggered off the English Civil war though was the outbreak of the Rising of 1641 here in Ireland. The Irish of Ulster drove out the Protestant English and Scots who had taken their lands in previous decades, massacring thousands in the process. As the months went by more of Ireland cast of the English yoke as the Catholics gained confidence in their ability to form an alternative political structure to direct rule by either English King or Parliament.

    When the news of the Irish revolt reached London the merchants there were outraged at the loss of their lands in which they had invested and also the news of the massacres (greatly exaggerated in the process) meant that on Charles return from Scotland (he had been playing a game of golf when he heard the news) they demanded action. It was decided to raise an Army to send to Ireland to suppress the ‘rebels’ and Parliament demanded control of the military forces dispatched. ‘By God, not for an hour’, was the answer from the King.

    Anyway for all his mistakes he died well anyway. He went to his death with his head held high and displayed a certain level of panache in his last public performance!
    http://www.irelandinhistory.blogspot.ie/

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    • #3
      Re: Re: Charles I, king of England, Scotland, and Ireland

      Originally posted by Wolfe Tone
      Charles I was a vain, conceited stubborn man. That been said he was perfectly within his constitutional rights as King of England anyway to rule as he wanted.

      He should have displayed more political savvy when dealing with his political opponents over the years though.
      Excellent points, Wolfe Tone.

      Chuckie is well known for his arrogance, but had he acted differently -- been more accomodating -- do you think he could have avoided a civil war and a beheading, given what was going on in Europe at the time?

      JS
      Barcsi János ispán vezérőrnagy
      Time Magazine's Person of the Year for 2003 & 2006


      "Never pet a burning dog."

      RECOMMENDED WEBSITES:
      http://www.mormon.org
      http://www.sca.org
      http://www.scv.org/
      http://www.scouting.org/

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