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Baker's Dozen (North American History Edition)

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  • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

    1. "A Can of Corn" from baseball about a an easy fly ball to catch.
    A grocer would have to get cans of corn off the top shelf with a stick or hook and would catch it in their apron.

    2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".[/B] - They used to sell baby pigs in burlap sacks. Unscrupulous characters would occasionally slip a sack with a cat in it in the mix.

    3. Barking up the wrong tree - The allusion is to hunting dogs barking at the bottom of trees where they mistakenly think their quarry is hiding. The earliest known printed citation is in James Kirke Paulding's Westward Ho!, 1832: "Here he made a note in his book, and I begun to smoke him for one of those fellows that drive a sort of a trade of making books about old Kentuck and the western country: so I thought I'd set him barking up the wrong tree a little, and I told him some stories that were enough to set the Mississippi a-fire; but he put them all down in his book."

    The phrase must have caught on in the USA quickly after Hall's book. It appeared in several American newspapers throughout the 1830s; for example, this piece from the Gettysburg newspaper The Adams Sentinel, March 1834:

    "General you are barkin' up the wrong tree this time, for I jest see that racoon jump to the next tree, and afore this he is a mile off in the woods.

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    • 13 North American Habitual Losers

      1. Bobby Valentine
      2. Chicago Cubs
      3. Al Gore

      4. Ralph Nader

      "Artillery lends dignity to what might otherwise be a vulgar brawl." - Frederick the Great

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      • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

        1. "A Can of Corn"
        2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
        3. Barking up the wrong tree

        4. Not buying a pig in a poke - Again referring to the practice of selling piglets in sacks. Again referring to the practice of some sellers to put other animals in the sack.
        "The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made."
        — Groucho Marx

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        • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

          1. "A Can of Corn"
          2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
          3. Barking up the wrong tree

          4. Not buying a pig in a poke - Again referring to the practice of selling piglets in sacks. Again referring to the practice of some sellers to put other animals in the sack.

          5. "Fair to middling" is an answer given when someone asks how someone is doing.
          Fair and middling are terms used by farmers to describe quaility of their animals or goods.

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          • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

            1. "A Can of Corn"
            2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
            3. Barking up the wrong tree
            4. Not buying a pig in a poke
            5. "Fair to middling"

            6. Howdy - A contraction of "How do you do?"
            "The secret of life is honesty and fair dealing. If you can fake that, you've got it made."
            — Groucho Marx

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            • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

              1. "A Can of Corn"
              2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
              3. Barking up the wrong tree
              4. Not buying a pig in a poke
              5. "Fair to middling"

              6. Howdy - A contraction of "How do you do?"

              7. "The Whole Nine Yards" which means the whole thing and everything. I had heard quite a few years back that the saying came from WWII when pilots on missions would tell the tailgunner to use the whole nine yards of bullets when they encountered strong resistance, but it looks like there may be other explanations.

              http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_whole_nine_yards

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              • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

                1. "A Can of Corn"
                2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
                3. Barking up the wrong tree
                4. Not buying a pig in a poke
                5. "Fair to middling"
                6. Howdy
                7. "The Whole Nine Yards"

                8. Believe it or Not!

                Ripley first called his cartoon feature, originally involving sports feats, Champs and Chumps, and it premiered on December 19, 1918, in the New York Globe. Ripley began adding items unrelated to sports, and in October 1919, he changed the title to Believe It or Not. The phrase hence became know as a expression of shock or disbelief.

                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ripley'...eve_It_or_Not!
                ´
                “You need to help people. I know it's not very Republican to say but you need to help people.” DONALD TRUMP, 2016

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                • Originally posted by Jonathanrex1 View Post
                  A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

                  1. "A Can of Corn"
                  2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
                  3. Barking up the wrong tree
                  4. Not buying a pig in a poke
                  5. "Fair to middling"
                  6. Howdy
                  7. "The Whole Nine Yards"

                  8. Believe it or Not!

                  Ripley first called his cartoon feature, originally involving sports feats, Champs and Chumps, and it premiered on December 19, 1918, in the New York Globe. Ripley began adding items unrelated to sports, and in October 1919, he changed the title to Believe It or Not. The phrase hence became know as a expression of shock or disbelief.

                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ripley'...eve_It_or_Not!
                  9. I did not come in on the last turnip wagon

                  used in the south to indicate that the person saying it was not gullible and did not believe what was being said by the other person

                  “Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.” -- Albert Einstein

                  The US Constitution doesn't need to be rewritten it needs to be reread

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                  • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

                    1. "A Can of Corn"
                    2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
                    3. Barking up the wrong tree
                    4. Not buying a pig in a poke
                    5. "Fair to middling"
                    6. Howdy
                    7. "The Whole Nine Yards"
                    8. Believe it or Not!
                    9. I did not come in on the last turnip wagon

                    10. If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

                    This is widely reported as being coined by US President Harry S. Truman. That's almost correct, but in fact Truman was known to have used it at least as early as 1942 - before becoming president. Here's a citation from an Idaho newspaper The Soda Springs Sun, from July that year:

                    "Favorite rejoinder of Senator Harry S. Truman, when a member of his war contracts investigating committee objects to his strenuous pace: 'If you don't like the heat, get out of the kitchen'."

                    Comment


                    • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

                      1. "A Can of Corn"
                      2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
                      3. Barking up the wrong tree
                      4. Not buying a pig in a poke
                      5. "Fair to middling"
                      6. Howdy
                      7. "The Whole Nine Yards"
                      8. Believe it or Not!
                      9. I did not come in on the last turnip wagon
                      10. If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen

                      11. "You're such a Mark!"

                      During the Depression hobos would put a chalk mark on the curbs of those home owners who were generous in giving hand-outs. It's come to mean a person who is easy to take advantage of.
                      So long as men worship the Caesars and Napoleons, Caesars and Napoleons will duly rise and make them miserable.

                      Aldous Huxley: Ends and Means (1937)

                      Comment


                      • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

                        1. "A Can of Corn"
                        2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
                        3. Barking up the wrong tree
                        4. Not buying a pig in a poke
                        5. "Fair to middling"
                        6. Howdy
                        7. "The Whole Nine Yards"
                        8. Believe it or Not!
                        9. I did not come in on the last turnip wagon
                        10. If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen
                        11. "You're such a Mark!"

                        12. Fancy Pants

                        The first reference to the term in print is in an advert in the Maine newspaper The Bangor Daily Whig And Courier, in October 1843. In that, a company of auctioneers called Williams and Prince advertised the sale of "Fancy Pants - Cassimere". That clearly refers to pants that were fancy. Cassimere was a type of soft woollen twill cloth. Not especially fancy by later standards but quite exotic for Bangor in the 1840s.

                        Comment


                        • A Bakers Dozen of North American sayings and their origins.

                          1. "A Can of Corn"
                          2. "Someone let the cat out of the bag".
                          3. Barking up the wrong tree
                          4. Not buying a pig in a poke
                          5. "Fair to middling"
                          6. Howdy
                          7. "The Whole Nine Yards"
                          8. Believe it or Not!
                          9. I did not come in on the last turnip wagon
                          10. If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen
                          11. "You're such a Mark!"

                          12. Fancy Pants

                          13. "You're getting too big for your britches" which means someone is trying to use power they don't have or are acting too bossy. Looks like the phrase came from Davy Crockett.http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/t...-breeches.html

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                          • A Bakers Dozen of North American missing persons, places or things.

                            1. Judge Crater who went missing in August of 1930 and was known as the "The Missingest Man in New York".

                            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Force_Crater

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                            • A Bakers Dozen of North American missing persons, places or things.

                              1. Judge Crater Went missing in 1930.

                              2. Mariam Makhniashvili Went missing in 2009.




                              Originally posted by CBC News
                              Toronto police said Friday they believe Mariam Makhniashvili, the Toronto teen missing since September 2009, died following a fall from a "significant height."

                              Police also confirmed on Friday that skeletal remains found last week in a wooded area are Makhniashvili's. The Toronto teen disappeared outside her high school two and a half years ago.

                              Two men on a walk discovered human remains 10 days ago in a wooded area near Yonge Street and Highway 401. The remains had been there for two to three years.

                              Read More
                              ´
                              “You need to help people. I know it's not very Republican to say but you need to help people.” DONALD TRUMP, 2016

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                              • A Bakers Dozen of North American missing persons, places or things.

                                1. Judge Crater Went missing in 1930.
                                2. Mariam Makhniashvili Went missing in 2009.

                                3. Roanoke Colony, missing since 1590

                                "There is no justice among men."- Tsar Nicholas II

                                “People never lie so much as after a hunt, during a war or before an election.” - Otto Von Bismarck

                                "It is always easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

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