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  • Assyrian Army

    Hello
    Besides the Roman army, the Assyrian one allways fascinated me.
    The Assyrian army was, perhaps, the first truly organised (in every aspect) army of History.
    As said, the Assyrian had infantry, both nationals
    http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/jp_v...cture35544.aspx
    and foreign auxiliary
    http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/jp_v...cture35546.aspx
    The use of the horse would that be in chariots or as cavalry
    http://community.imaginefx.com/fxpose/jp_v...cture30728.aspx
    Was also a weapon that helped the Assyrian to achieve their maximum glory.
    The Assyrian exceled also and notably at siege warfare.
    Besides all the major components of an army (until the advent of gunpowder), the Assyrian made great use of psychological warfare.
    Their method was simple but very effective: to inspire the terror on your foe is almost to win the war; after each action of intimidation the Assyrian made sure that everyone possible knew about it.
    So, even before Rome was anything else than a small city, Assyrian had a professional, highly trained, ruthless and efficiently army.
    Best regards
    My Paintings at

  • #2
    I don't know too much about the Assyrians, but I had read a little bit about them. I think I had read that when Marco Polo was in China, that Assyrian missionaries were already there and had traveled by foot. I thought I had read that they were the first to start universities, and develop things like the lock and key. There was some other interesting stuff too. I had also read that they have faced a long history of genocide as well.

    "Get three coffins ready" The Man With No Name

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    • #3
      Rock, are you sure you aren't thinking of Armenians?
      Every 10 years a great man.
      Who paid the bill?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Zemlekop View Post
        Rock, are you sure you aren't thinking of Armenians?
        Here's a few links about their history I found. It talks about the attacks on their people and their culture. Seems like they have a very long history.

        http://assyriafoundation.org/modern_history.html

        http://assyriafoundation.org/ancient_history.html

        "Get three coffins ready" The Man With No Name

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        • #5
          Thanks for the links...very interesting
          My Paintings at

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          • #6
            Some excerpts from a very good book - From Sumer to Rome: The Military Capabilities of Ancient Armies, by Karen S Metz, with Richard A Gabriel as a major contributor...
            • In the 8th century B.C., when the entire Assyrian army included 150,000-200,000 men, a combat field army of 50,000 men would be equal to 5 modern American heavy divisions, or 8 Soviet field divisions.
            • When arrayed for battle, a field army occupied an area of 2,500 yards (almost 1.5 miles) across and 100 yards deep. After the fall of Rome, it was not until Napoloen's re-institution of conscription that armies of such a size would be mustered.
            • The Assyrians were the first to invent large cavalry squadrons.
            • A special logistics branch, the Musarkisus, was created to keep the army supplied with horses. It was able to obtain 3,000 horses a month for military use. Once again, it was not until Napoleon that such large amounts of horses would be systematically procdured for the army.
            • The "strategic mobility" of the Assyrian army, or their ability to project their military force over a given area, was 375,000 square miles. After Rome fell, no army exceeded this area until the American Civil War, when the use of railroads made troop movements easier.
            • In terms of efficiency of organization, no military staff (i.e. administrators, logistic officers and engineers) would reach the proficiency of the Assyrian or Roman military staffs until the German general staff of the 1870's.
            • The prototype of a modern soldier's equipment (helmet, body armor, boots [a particular Assyrian innovation], and backpack) was invented by ancient armies and disappeared for almost 1,000 years after the fall of the Roman Empire.
            • The killing power of an ancient composite bow (i.e. the accuracy, force, distance, and speed of deployment) was not matched until the introduction of the Prussian needle gun in 1871.
            • According to modern tests, the body armor, helmet, and shield of the Assyrians would have provided excellent protection against firearms until Napoleon. If the dispersion of field formations, inaccuracy of early firearms, and rates of fire are considered, the Assyrian soldier would have been safer on a battlefield in the 18th century than on an Ancient Near Eastern one.
            An interesting read, indeed!

            On the Plains of Hesitation lie the blackened bones of countless millions who, at the dawn of victory, sat down to rest-and resting... died. Adlai E. Stevenson

            ACG History Today

            BoRG

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            • #7
              Yes, the Assyrian were, indeed, the ones that aplied a lot of inovations to warfare.
              The book mentioned sounds very interesteing: i will take a closer look at it: thanks
              My Paintings at

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