Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

If there was one individual you most admire in military history...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • If there was one individual you most admire in military history...

    For all the military history folk, if you could name one historical military figure (can still be alive) that you most admire, respect, find yourself most interested in, who would it be? And if you could provide a brief explanation for your reasoning, that would be sublime.


    Personally, mine is Alexander Suvorov, arguably one of the best pre-Napoleonic generals of the early modern era. Fought in 64 battles and never lost one. Was a simple man who believed that discipline and extensive (and often excruciating) training would lead to the creation of a quality fighting force. Was a strong advocate of "attacking with the cold steel" (the bayonet) and famously uttered, "Achieve victory not by numbers, but by knowing how."



    Edit: Credit to Stratego's really cool recent Napoleon poll; that's where I got the idea.
    Last edited by Wellington95; 22 Dec 12, 17:43.
    "I am the Lorax, and I'll yell and I'll shout for the fine things on earth that are on their way out!"

    ~Dr. Seuss, The Lorax


    "The trouble with Scotland...is that it's full of Scots!"

  • #2
    Hannibal; anyone that could terrify Rome is good in my opinion.
    Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

    Comment


    • #3
      Excellent idea; these threads are the more thought provoking ones I think.

      Who do I
      Originally posted by Wellington
      most admire, respect, find yourself most interested in,
      - tough question. I could pick a historical figure or two but whilst they were involved in military history, they weren't generals. Selous tops my list of historical figures, but only served in the the Great War and the Bulawayo Field Force, he is not remembered so much as a military man, despite his death in combat. Despite that he is the one I most amidre and respect and am interested in. Tied with him would be Theodore Roosevelt - I think he's fascinating and had many great ideas. But again, a president as much if not more than a soldier.
      ------
      'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

      If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

      Comment


      • #4
        General George C. Marshall
        "Ask not what your country can do for you"

        Left wing, Right Wing same bird that they are killing.

        you’re entitled to your own opinion but not your own facts.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Tsar View Post
          Hannibal; anyone that could terrify Rome is good in my opinion.
          Was my second option.
          "I am the Lorax, and I'll yell and I'll shout for the fine things on earth that are on their way out!"

          ~Dr. Seuss, The Lorax


          "The trouble with Scotland...is that it's full of Scots!"

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Tsar View Post
            Hannibal; anyone that could terrify Rome is good in my opinion.
            Scipio Africanus. Anyone who terrifies the Carthaginians and beats up Hannibal Barca in command of a larger army on its homeground is great in my opinion.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
              Scipio Africanus. Anyone who terrifies the Carthaginians and beats up Hannibal Barca in command of a larger army on its homeground is great in my opinion.
              Scipio always seemed to me to be the Wellington of Napoleon. Yeah Wellington beat him and perhaps at Waterloo was the superior tactician, but in terms of overall strategic skill, I've always inclined towards Napoleon, largely due to his record and contributions to military strategic advancement. I tend to think similarly regarding Scipio and Hannibal.
              "I am the Lorax, and I'll yell and I'll shout for the fine things on earth that are on their way out!"

              ~Dr. Seuss, The Lorax


              "The trouble with Scotland...is that it's full of Scots!"

              Comment


              • #8


                Philip
                "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts."— Bertrand Russell

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Wellington95 View Post
                  Scipio always seemed to me to be the Wellington of Napoleon. Yeah Wellington beat him and perhaps at Waterloo was the superior tactician, but in terms of overall strategic skill, I've always inclined towards Napoleon, largely due to his record and contributions to military strategic advancement. I tend to think similarly regarding Scipio and Hannibal.
                  Check the Battle of Ilipa, which is probably a better classic battle study than Cannae and fought on Spanish (Iberian) soil, that basically wrestle Carthaginian rule from those lands into Roman hands. Scipio would later move to the African continent to finish off the Carthaginian threat.

                  He is the first Roman leader to expand Roman territory outside the Italian "boot."

                  BTW, noted Liddell Hart considered Scipio superior to Napoleon and wrote a whole book on why he thought so.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
                    Check the Battle of Ilipa, which is probably a better classic battle study than Cannae and fought on Spanish (Iberian) soil, that basically wrestle Carthaginian rule from those lands into Roman hands. Scipio would later move to the African continent to finish off the Carthaginian threat.

                    He is the first Roman leader to expand Roman territory outside the Italian "boot."

                    BTW, noted Liddell Hart considered Scipio superior to Napoleon and wrote a whole book on why he thought so.
                    Indeed the reverse Cannae maneuver and the changing of deployment during Hasdrubal's advance was a definite masterstroke. But was it truly better and more revolutionary than Hannibal's pincer at Cannae? (the first one to have been successfully used and recorded by Polybius.) And that's not even to mention the disparity of forces Hannibal had to endure at Cannae compared to the closer margin Scipio had to deal with it Ilipa.

                    Nevertheless, I'll have to read more B. H. Hart
                    "I am the Lorax, and I'll yell and I'll shout for the fine things on earth that are on their way out!"

                    ~Dr. Seuss, The Lorax


                    "The trouble with Scotland...is that it's full of Scots!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Captain Jean Danjou.

                      "In modern war... you will die like a dog for no good reason."
                      Ernest Hemingway.

                      "We're all going to die, all of us; what a circus! That alone should make us love each other, but it doesn't. We are terrorised and flattened by trivialities."
                      Bukowski

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Capt AFB View Post
                        Check the Battle of Ilipa, which is probably a better classic battle study than Cannae and fought on Spanish (Iberian) soil, that basically wrestle Carthaginian rule from those lands into Roman hands. Scipio would later move to the African continent to finish off the Carthaginian threat.

                        He is the first Roman leader to expand Roman territory outside the Italian "boot."

                        BTW, noted Liddell Hart considered Scipio superior to Napoleon and wrote a whole book on why he thought so.

                        So? It doesn’t change my beliefs. We were asked who we admire not who is the best.
                        Politics is the art of looking for trouble, finding it whether it exists or not, diagnosing it incorrectly and applying the wrong remedy. -- Ernest Benn

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Tsar View Post
                          So? It doesn’t change my beliefs. We were asked who we admire not who is the best.
                          Not asking for you to change your belief.

                          I'm just having an exchange of opinions with Wellington95 about Scipio vs Hannibal.

                          BTW, for myself, close second to Scipio as military I admire the most are LCol Michel de Salaberry (1812 War) and Gen Sir Arthur Currie (WW1).
                          Last edited by Capt AFB; 23 Dec 12, 07:58.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            George Washington for me - did what he had to do to keep "the army in being", didn't take the crown, turned power over, went home.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Wellington95 View Post
                              Personally, mine is Alexander Suvorov, arguably one of the best pre-Napoleonic generals of the early modern era. Fought in 64 battles and never lost one. Was a simple man who believed that discipline and extensive (and often excruciating) training would lead to the creation of a quality fighting force. Was a strong advocate of "attacking with the cold steel" (the bayonet) and famously uttered, "Achieve victory not by numbers, but by knowing how."

                              Seconded, of course.

                              www.histours.ru

                              Siege of Leningrad battlefield tour

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              • casanova
                                Berlin.1945
                                by casanova
                                The Sowjet T-34 tank against a German Tiger tank in Berlin in the II World War in 1945. ...
                                Today, 23:41
                              • casanova
                                AW 169M
                                by casanova
                                The Austrian minister of defence Klaudia Tanner declared the buy of 18 Italian military helicopters of the type AW 169M for the Austrian army, the Bundesheer....
                                Today, 23:26
                              • JBark
                                What changed?
                                by JBark
                                There was a time not too long ago when this forum was full of discussion, multiple posts, votes and involved discussions on the best of the war, etc.,...
                                Today, 18:54
                              Working...
                              X