Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

The first ever World War?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • The first ever World War?

    What is a World War?

    How big does a war have to be to be a World War?

    What was the first ever World War?
    How to Talk to a Climate Skeptic: http://grist.org/series/skeptics/
    Global Warming & Climate Change Myths: https://www.skepticalscience.com/argument.php

  • #2
    Originally posted by Nick the Noodle View Post
    What is a World War?

    How big does a war have to be to be a World War?

    What was the first ever World War?
    I would go back to the eighteenth century when Britain's conflicts with France (and others) embraced not only Europe ,but the Americas, India and the High Seas.
    "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
    Samuel Johnson.

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, that'd be my bid too. But then I had a thought. The term 'the world' can be subjective, I suppose (I wouldn't normally say so but for the sake of this thread it may be worth baring in mind) therefore, that in some respects the Chinese and Greeks each believed their wars were deciding the fate of the world or encompassed the world as they knew it. But I suppose that could be said of any group, no matter how small, who have little or no knowledge of the world, or new worlds, outside their own full experience. SO the point's probably moot. Still, academic navel gazing, eh
      ------
      'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

      If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

      Comment


      • #4
        Haven't we had this discussion a couple of times before here at ACG?

        IIRC one of the answers that came up when defining a World War is a conflict fought on all continents.

        First one in that category was the Dutch-Portugese War of 1602, fought on European battlefields, Africa (Angola), the Americas (Brasil) and Asia (Spice islands and Macau).
        Last edited by Colonel Sennef; 25 Nov 12, 10:20.
        BoRG

        You may not be interested in War, but War is interested in You - Leon Trotski, June 1919.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
          I would go back to the eighteenth century when Britain's conflicts with France (and others) embraced not only Europe ,but the Americas, India and the High Seas.
          I agree. The Seven Years War is what I would call the first world war as there was fighting from Europe, Africa, India, North America and many more places. And most of the world powers at the time were involved. I guess that kinda counts as a world war

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by calger14 View Post
            I agree. The Seven Years War is what I would call the first world war as there was fighting from Europe, Africa, India, North America and many more places. And most of the world powers at the time were involved. I guess that kinda counts as a world war
            Agreed. Definitely the French and Indian War also known as The Seven Years War.
            "Profanity is but a linguistic crutch for illiterate motherbleepers"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by johnbryan View Post
              Agreed. Definitely the French and Indian War also known as The Seven Years War.
              Euh, it was just a part of the Seven Years War.
              There are no Nazis in Ukraine. Idiots

              Comment


              • #8
                Hm but what distinguish real WW1 from all previous wars is massive mobilization of enormous population on several continents and industrial nature of such war. It is called Great for that reason.

                Wars that precede it are like a small skirmishes in comparison.
                It is always more difficult to fight against faith than against knowledge.

                Косово је Србија!
                Never go to war with a country whose national holiday celebrates a defeat in 1389.

                Armored Brigade

                Armored Brigade Facebook page

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Major Sennef View Post
                  Haven't we had this discussion a couple of times before here at ACG?

                  IIRC one of the answers that came up when defining a World War is a conflict fought on all continents.

                  First one in that category was the Dutch-Portugese War of 1602, fought on European battlefields, Africa (Angola), the Americas (Brasil) and Asia (Spice islands and Macau).
                  Which war included Antarctica?
                  Flag: USA / Location: West Coast

                  Prayers.

                  BoRG

                  http://img204.imageshack.us/img204/8757/snap1ws8.jpg

                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5PtsX_Z3CMU

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Salinator View Post
                    Which war included Antarctica?
                    Or South America in the First World War?

                    Maybe. Just nobody told me.


                    Philip
                    "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by PhilipLaos View Post
                      Or South America in the First World War?

                      Maybe. Just nobody told me.


                      Philip
                      Coronel and the Falklands naval actions: geographically speaking ?
                      "I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight".
                      Samuel Johnson.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BELGRAVE View Post
                        Coronel and the Falklands naval actions: geographically speaking ?
                        You are right, sir.

                        The naval battle off the coast of central Chile, at Coronel, galvanised the British admiralty into action once news of the complete destruction of Admiral Sir Christopher Cradock's squadron by German Admiral Spee filtered through. The Royal Navy, with Japanese assistance, had spent months searching for the German East Asiatic commerce-raiding squadron known to be operating under Admiral Spee in the Pacific (Spee having moved from far eastern waters once Japan entered the war on Britain's side), without success.

                        News came through to the British - from an intercepted radio communication - in early October revealing details of a plan devised by Spee to prey upon shipping in the crucial trading routes along the west coast of South America. Patrolling South America at that time was Admiral Cradock's West Indies Squadron, which consisted of two armoured cruisers, Good Hope (Cradock's flagship) and Monmouth, the light cruiser Glasgow, and a converted ex-liner, Otranto. With the seas difficult (to the disadvantage of the British) Spee reacted by moving his faster vessels out of Cradock's firing range; at sunset - 7pm - with the moon clearly silhouetting Cradock's fleet, he began to shell the latter's force, with Scharnhorst's third salvo crippling the flagship Good Hope; both Good

                        Hope
                        and Monmouth were destroyed shortly afterwards, Monmouth under repeated battering. There were no survivors in either, Cradock himself going down with the Good Hope. Glasgow and Otranto both escaped (although the former suffered five strikes). Spee's own fleet had suffered little damage, and sailed thereafter to Valparaiso to a rapturous welcome from the local German population.

                        Once news of the scale of the British defeat, and its consequent humiliation, reached the British Admiralty in London a decision was quickly taken to assemble a huge naval force under Admiral Sir Frederick Sturdee. This was promptly dispatched to destroy Spee's force: which it subsequently did, at the Battle of the Falkland Islands.
                        Read more at: http://www.firstworldwar.com/battles/coronel.htm
                        "The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so certain of themselves, and wiser people so full of doubts." Bertrand Russell

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'd go with the 7YW. as discussed here: http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forum...d.php?t=123120
                          www.13thfoot.co.uk

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If you define world as "known world" I think you could shift it as far back as the punic wars
                            Lambert of Montaigu - Crusader.

                            Bolgios - Mercenary Game.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Snowygerry View Post
                              If you define world as "known world" I think you could shift it as far back as the punic wars
                              Yup
                              ------
                              'I would rather be exposed to the inconveniencies attending too much liberty than those attending too small a degree of it.' - Thomas Jefferson

                              If you have questions about the forum please check the FAQ/Rules

                              Comment

                              Latest Topics

                              Collapse

                              Working...
                              X