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  • #31
    Bump for upcoming reference ...
    Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
    TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
    Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

    Comment


    • #32
      Got distracted and forgot that "upcoming reference", meanwhile, rather than start another thread, depositing this here for now. It's a reverse ranking based on total expenditures (US $ equivalent) and not on a %GDP or per capita basis, so will be obvious whom is number one, but some on the list are rather interesting;
      The world's most expensive armed forces

      http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/money...Bnb7Kz#image=1
      Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
      Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

      Comment


      • #33
        Decline of the West: These countries will rule the world in 2050

        Wonder which major industrialized countries will be richer or poorer 33 years from now? Accountancy firm PwC has just released a report outlining growth forecasts to 2050 for 32 of the largest economies in the world. We count down where it says these countries will be in 2050 from 32 to 1 based on GDP at Purchasing Power Parity (PPP), which allows for a more accurate measure of what countries will be producing.
        Click ahead to see the world's future powerhouse economies.

        http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/marke...1a5?li=BBnb7Kz
        Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
        TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
        Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

        Comment


        • #34
          Rather than a new thread ...
          Top 5 global concerns that could keep you awake at night
          http://advertisementfeature.cnn.com/...adcontent_emea
          Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
          Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

          Comment


          • #35
            Bin Laden once said-
            "We--with Allah's help--call on every Muslim who believes in God and wishes to be rewarded to comply with Allah's order to kill the Americans and plunder their money wherever and whenever they find it.
            We also call on Muslim ulema, leaders, youths, and soldiers to launch the raid on Satan's U.S. troops and the devil's supporters allying with them, and to displace those who are behind them so that they may learn a lesson."
            -Bin Laden edict Feb 1998


            And we're seeing that now with mass muslim invasion of European countries like leeches who bleed our welfare systems dry.
            At least America has now got a President who's against it..

            Comment


            • #36
              Economists understand little about the causes of growth

              The first in a series of columns on the profession’s shortcomings
              ...
              OVER the past decade economists have been intensely scrutinised for their intellectual failings in the run-up to the 2007-08 financial crisis. Yet had the recession that followed been more severe—wiping a quarter off the GDP of every advanced economy, say—those countries would still have ended up four times as rich per person, in purchasing-power terms, as developing countries are now, and more than ten times as rich as sub-Saharan ones. Robert Lucas, a Nobel prizewinning economist, once wrote that after you have started to think about the gap between poor and rich countries it is hard to think about anything else. Economists understand even less about economic growth than about business cycles. But the profession has done too little to address this failure or to understand its implications.

              Economists have precious few hard facts about growth. They know that sustained growth in GDP per person only started in the 18th century. They know that countries can become rich only by growing steadily over long periods. They know that in some fundamental way growth is about using new technologies to become more productive and to uncover new ideas. Beyond that, almost everything is contested.
              ...
              At bottom, such issues must be the most important ones. An economist might explain China’s rapid growth in the 1980s by saying that it began to deploy more capital per worker and to adopt foreign technologies. Yet it was very clearly the result of a political decision to loosen state control over economic activity. It would similarly be accurate to say that China’s future growth will depend on how well it develops and deploys new technologies. But that depends on decisions about economic governance taken by its leaders, which will in turn be influenced by social and geopolitical forces that economists scarcely understand and generally ignore. Economists might imagine that if they were put in charge of a poor country, they could get it to grow. But a formula for growth that takes no account of social and political complexities is no formula at all.

              Ignore it and it will grow away

              A clearer understanding of how growth happens, and why growth-boosting institutions sometimes wither or fail to take root, could raise the living standards of billions of people. The economics of growth should therefore be central to the discipline, even though the questions it poses are objectively hard, and the answers rest more in history and politics than in elegant mathematics. Until they can give better answers in this area, economists should speak with greater humility about how this structural reform or that tax change might affect long-term growth. They have not earned the right to confidence.
              ...
              https://www.economist.com/news/finan...ngs-economists
              Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
              Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                Decline of the West: These countries will rule the world in 2050

                Wonder which major industrialized countries will be richer or poorer 33 years from now? Accountancy firm PwC has just released a report outlining growth forecasts to 2050 for 32 of the largest economies in the world. We count down where it says these countries will be in 2050 from 32 to 1 based on GDP at Purchasing Power Parity (PPP), which allows for a more accurate measure of what countries will be producing.
                Click ahead to see the world's future powerhouse economies.
                Didn't watch as the premise is already misleading. The West isn't declining; it is changing. While 2nd and 3rd world countries might be catching up with their industries they are nowhere near with the service industry; and that is where the future of economy lies, at least for now.

                The West is in fact transforming itself into a "middle-class" in global economy. This requires quite a high level of education, and from what I've seen these highly educated people from other countries are migrating to western economies(even if most people seem to think migrants are just uneducated criminals).

                Interesting to see what happens to those western people who wont be able to compete...well, we can already see some indication of what is happening with them.
                Wisdom is personal

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by Karri View Post
                  Didn't watch as the premise is already misleading. The West isn't declining; it is changing. While 2nd and 3rd world countries might be catching up with their industries they are nowhere near with the service industry; and that is where the future of economy lies, at least for now.

                  The West is in fact transforming itself into a "middle-class" in global economy. This requires quite a high level of education, and from what I've seen these highly educated people from other countries are migrating to western economies(even if most people seem to think migrants are just uneducated criminals).

                  Interesting to see what happens to those western people who wont be able to compete...well, we can already see some indication of what is happening with them.
                  Might check your dictionary ...
                  "Migrants" tend to refer to traveling workers whom go from harvest to harvest or similar temporary work situations, transients whom work, then move on or return where they came from.

                  "Immigrants" tend to refer to those seeking to stay in the country they have entered, often to become citizens. Come in two flavors, Legal and Illegal. It's illegal immigrants that most of us have issue with. Will gladly send them to your nation to keep if you like.
                  Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                  TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                  Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                    [B]...

                    Ignore it and it will grow away

                    A clearer understanding of how growth happens, and why growth-boosting institutions sometimes wither or fail to take root, could raise the living standards of billions of people. The economics of growth should therefore be central to the discipline, even though the questions it poses are objectively hard, and the answers rest more in history and politics than in elegant mathematics. Until they can give better answers in this area, economists should speak with greater humility about how this structural reform or that tax change might affect long-term growth. They have not earned the right to confidence.
                    ...
                    https://www.economist.com/news/finan...ngs-economists
                    One the complexities is our tendency to measure all things economic in financial terms, GDP being a well known example. This makes it difficult to estimate the value of accumulated knowledge as a form of capital that increases a nation's net wealth and overall productivity.
                    Any metaphor will tear if stretched over too much reality.

                    Questions about our site? See the FAQ.

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Seems a good place for this;
                      The Key to Everything
                      Freeman Dyson
                      May 10, 2018 Issue

                      Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies
                      by Geoffrey West

                      The article
                      http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2018...to-everything/
                      EXCERPT:
                      Geoffrey West spent most of his life as a research scientist and administrator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, running programs concerned not with nuclear weapons but with peaceful physics. After retiring from Los Alamos, he became director of the nearby Santa Fe Institute, where he switched from physics to a broader interdisciplinary program known as complexity science. The Santa Fe Institute is leading the world in complexity science, with a mixed group of physicists, biologists, economists, political scientists, computer experts, and mathematicians working together. Their aim is to reach a deep understanding of the complexities of the natural environment and of human society, using the methods of science.

                      Scale
                      is a progress report, summarizing the insights that West and his colleagues at Santa Fe have achieved. West does remarkably well as a writer, making a complicated world seem simple. He uses pictures and diagrams to explain the facts, with a leisurely text to put the facts into their proper setting, and no equations. There are many digressions, expressing personal opinions and telling stories that give a commonsense meaning to scientific conclusions. The text and the pictures could probably be understood and enjoyed by a bright ten-year-old or by a not-so-bright grandparent.

                      The title, Scale, needs some clarification. To explain what his book is about, West added the subtitle “The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies.” The title tells us that the universal laws the book lays down are scaling laws. The word “scale” is a verb meaning “vary together.” Each scaling law says that two measurable quantities vary together in a particular way.

                      We suppose that the variation of each quantity is expressed as a percentage rate of increase or decrease. The scaling law then says that the percentage rate for quantity A is a fixed number k times the percentage rate for quantity B. The number k is called the power of the scaling law. Since the percentage changes of A and B accumulate with compound interest, the scaling law says that A varies with the kth power of B, where now the word “power” has its usual mathematical meaning. For example, if a body is falling without air resistance, the scaling law between distance fallen and time has k=2. The distance varies with the square of time. You fall 16 feet in one second, 64 feet in two seconds, 144 feet in three seconds, and so on.

                      Another classic example of a scaling law is the third law of planetary motion, discovered by the astronomer Johannes Kepler in 1618. Kepler found by careful observation that the time it takes for a planet to orbit the sun scales with the three-halves power of the diameter of its orbit. That means that the square of the time is proportional to the cube of the distance. Kepler measured the periods and diameters of the orbits of the six planets known in his time, and found that they followed the scaling law precisely. Fifty-nine years later, Isaac Newton explained Kepler’s laws of planetary motion as consequences of a mathematical theory of universal gravitation. Kepler’s laws gave Newton the essential clues that led to the theoretical understanding of the physical universe.
                      ...
                      Last edited by G David Bock; 23 Apr 18, 13:56.
                      Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                      TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                      Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                        Might check your dictionary ...
                        "Migrants" tend to refer to traveling workers whom go from harvest to harvest or similar temporary work situations, transients whom work, then move on or return where they came from.

                        "Immigrants" tend to refer to those seeking to stay in the country they have entered, often to become citizens. Come in two flavors, Legal and Illegal. It's illegal immigrants that most of us have issue with. Will gladly send them to your nation to keep if you like.
                        Migrant is simply someone who has migrated.
                        Wisdom is personal

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by Karri View Post
                          Migrant is simply someone who has migrated.
                          English/American usage:
                          Definition of migrant

                          : one that migrates: such as
                          a : a person who moves regularly in order to find work especially in harvesting crops
                          b : an animal that shifts from one habitat to another

                          https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/migrant
                          migrant

                          adjective
                          Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                          TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                          Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by G David Bock View Post
                            one that migrates
                            So what was your point regarding my post?
                            Wisdom is personal

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by Karri View Post

                              So what was your point regarding my post?
                              "Migrant" tends to be temporary and transient ...
                              "Immigrant" tends to seek permanent status/relocation.

                              Perhaps something lost in translation and culture perspective differences.
                              Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                              TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                              Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                being closest and latest related thread (?) ....
                                The secretive Bilderberg elite are worried about the 'post-truth' world
                                • Some of the planet's most powerful people will take part in the infamously secretive Bilderberg meeting that begins Thursday to discuss their most pressing concerns
                                • Russia, free trade and the "post-truth" world are on the agenda.
                                • Political leaders and experts from industry, finance, academia and the media will take part in the annual conference.
                                Holly Ellyatt | @HollyEllyatt
                                Published 8:19 AM ET Wed, 6 June 2018 Updated 21 Hours Ago CNBC.com
                                https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/06/bild...-politics.html

                                VATICAN AT BILDERBERG: Top cardinal to join elite meeting...
                                Whiskey for my men, and beer for my horses.
                                TANSTAAFL = There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
                                Bock's First Law of History: The Past shapes the Present, which forms the Future. *

                                Comment

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