Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

MP-40's in Indochina?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Kelt, sorry for that. Here is the post:

    Also used rebarreled Mat-49s
    Altus, you could also find Mat-49s in Vietnam that had been re-barreled to a 7.65 (?) pistol cartridge. The key to these was to look for the serial number. It one serial number had been struck out, and another added, it was re-barreled to this smaller but more common cartridge, rather than its original 9mm parabellum. I picked up such a weapon from my local VC, and loaded up the magazines with 9mm. When firing, I noticed that it tended to spray particles out of the chamber/receiver. After a few magazines, I decided to fire a few rounds into a sandbag to see if my suspicion was right. Sure enough, the rounds recovered from the sandbag were elongated. The amazing part is that the Mat-50 fired those few magazines without malfunctioning. I am unsure if this conversion was done up North, or in some local factory.
    __________________
    dit: Lirelou
    dit: Lirelou

    Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by lirelou View Post
      Kelt, sorry for that. Here is the post:
      Thanks for the information, lucky for you the replacement barrel was strong enough to take the extra beating and the Engineers had foreseen the risk of case failure on firing and ported the entry chamber to allow pressure to escape sideways.

      The two lateral holes at 3 and 9 O'clock located below the barrel locking pin on the receiver are designed as overpressure vent holes:
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #33
        Originally posted by lirelou View Post
        Parachute battalions rotating into Indochina often had to scrounge up the weapons they were going to fight with. In the case of the 3rd BCCP (Colonial Para-Commando Battalion), they managed to find a cache of MP-40s that had been kept by France as part of war reparations. And that is what they deployed to Indochina with. (Paul Bondroit, "3e BCCP Indochine 1948-50) Check ou the photo on p. 115.
        So, what you're saying is that some soldiers could potentially deploy WITHOUT WEAPONS?
        "The Bangalore Torpedo was 50' long and packed with 85 pounds of TNT and you assembled it along the way. By hand. I'd love to meet the ******* who invented it."

        Comment


        • #34
          I don't know of any who deployed to Indochina without weapons. The 3rd BCCP drew theirs before deploying. Bondroit's book is the only one I've ever found that goes into such detail. (704 pages of material, much of it first hand from veterans.)
          dit: Lirelou

          Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

          Comment


          • #35
            It's a good chance they bought the weapon. They also bought the US Parachutse the M- 1 carbine , but I heard the had the stock changed from an wooden one to just the metal frame stock .

            Comment


            • #36
              It's a good chance they bought the weapon.


              Yankee, during WWII the French received their weapons from three sources. First, the British, who armed the Free French. Second, the Americans, under Lend Lease, to the Free French government, and later to the Provisional French Government. Third, from German stocks captured by the Free French , and those given to France by Germany as War Reparations. The MP-40s came from this last category.

              As far as what the U.S. gave the French Provisional government, it was strictly limited to Europe, as President Roosevelt opposed all European powers from using Lend Lease supplies in any operation to regain their colonies. However, in drawing up plans for the final push against Japan, which was expected to take until 1947 or later, the United States agreed to equip and train two French Divisions along USMC lines for amphibious operations against Japan. The two divisions selected were the 3rd and 9th Colonial Infantry Divisions. When the War against Japan ended as quickly as it did, one of those divisions (if memory serves) had been fully equipped and partially trained, and the second had been partially equipped.

              The first units into Indochina came our of Ceylon (Sri Lanka), China, and the POW compounds of Indochina, these were followed by the two Colonial Infantry divisions that had been part of the French Expeditionary Corps targeted to Japan, followed by general units from France and the colonies as the war ground on. Hence the scramble for uniforms and weapons that saw French units armed with British Enfields, American Enfields, Mauser K-98s, etc, and vehicles such as American jeeps and British Bren Carriers.

              Now, Lend-Lease weapons and military equipment were expected to be eventually paid for, and I assume British military material was likewise on a pay-later basis, so in that sense, every weapon that went into Indochina was "bought' by France until at least 1950.
              dit: Lirelou

              Phong trần mài một lưỡi gươm, Những loài giá áo túi cơm sá ǵ!

              Comment

              Latest Topics

              Collapse

              Working...
              X